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Full text of "Seamen's Journal (Sept.7-Apr.5, 1921-1922)"

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INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-FIVE 

SEPTEMBER 7, 1921— APRIL 5, 1922 



All editorial matter is designated by an 
asterisk (*). 

Title No. Page 

A 

Able Seamen's Certificates 13-11; 14-7 

Abstruse Reasoning * 7 6 

Aircraft vs. Steamboat (by Charles Mc- 

Henry Pond) 30 2 

Airplanes Settle Strike * 30 7 

Alaska Fishermen's Death List 29 11 

Alaska Once Subtropical 15 9 

Alaska, Statistics of....' 17 13 

Alaska Time Does Not Count * 6 6 

Alaska, Volcanic Fires in 19 9 

Along the Wicked Path * 30 6 

American Federation of Labor — 

A. F. of L. On Guard 11 3 

Another "liill" Proposed 23 6 

Assuring Help to Miners 30 9 

Back to Human Slavery 24 11 

Daugherty Would Chain Labor (by 

Samuel Gompers) 2 3 

Democracy in Industry 11 1 

Destroying Unions 16 2 

Different Methods and Results * 10 6 

Disarmament Is Possible 5 5 

Helping the Radicals 17 8 

In Again and Out Again * 20 6 

Judge Gary the Autocrat 26 7 

O. B. U. Fades Away 16 9 

One Big Union Plan Rejected 16 8 

Onward Spirit, The * 16 6 

Raps "Third House".' 10 6 

Scheme to Shackle Labor, A 21 6 

Reciting a Bit of History 25 <S 

Shipowners, Greedy 4 5 

Strike Echo, Seamen's 14 3 

Union Shop and Freedom 14 9 

Workers' Side, Sustaining 23 7 

Would Establish Slavery 17 8 

"American Plan," Coercion by 24 7 

American Republics, Central 13 8 

Americanizing the Foreigner (by A. I. 

Pearlman) 27 2 

Americans Need Apply Only * 22 6 

America's Evil Genius 14 9 

Amnesty Campaign. New 13 2 

Amnesty Urged 9 6 

Appeal for Humanity, An (by Senator 

Borah) 19 1 

Arbitration, Attti-Strike Laws, Etc. — 

\nti-Labor Law Attacked 7 3 

Arbitration in Labor Disputes, No 

Compulsory (by Victor A. Olander) 18 1 
Attempt to Re-establish 54-hour Week 

in Textile Industry 31 4 

Stevedores Sign New Wage Scale.... 9 5 

On Compulsory Arbitration 21 7 

Master Cure. The (the New York- 
State "Can't-Strike" Bill) 19 6 

Inviting Trouble 20 9 

Garment Manufacturers' Association 
and the International Ladies' Gar- 
ment Workers' Union 19 4 

Comments on the "Can't-Strike" Sug- 
gestions 20 4 



Title No. Page 

"Can't Be Done in New York" 21 3 

Army and Navy (Whitewashing the 

Facts) 12 9 

Armour's Frame-up Exposed 20 8 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

Chinese Labor Organizing 10 7 

Chinese Leak Through 1 S 

Chinese Tie-up, The * 21 7 

Expensive Privilege (Narcotics 

Smuggled by Chinese Crews on 

"State" Ships) 30 6 

Increase of Japanese Families in 

Hawaii 17 15 

Japanese Expansion 11 5 

Labor Unions Gaining in Japan 16 9 

Labor Unions in Japan 27 15 

'Inly Americans Need Apply * 22 6 

Oppose Coolie Plan 1 7 

Atlantic and Gulf Coasts — 

Another "Company" Pinion * 19 6 

Cause for Complaint (by Peter Sepp l 3 S 

Galveston Deports Cnemployed Sea- 
men 4 8 

Lockout Event Reviewed, A ( Drief 
Account of the I. W. W. Attempt 
to "Capture" the Eastern and Gulf 

Sailors' Association) 30 1 

Master Cure, The ( Xew York State 

"Can't-Strike" Bill) 19 6 

Seamen Organize (by Fred Holtzbergi 13 9 

Shell Game, The Old Time 19 7 

Unemployment in Galveston 4 8 

Warning Heeded. A (by George 

Foley) 12 9 

Australian Seamen, Etc. — 

Australia Has 44-hour Week 7 11 

Provisions of the Australian Workers' 

Compensation Act 22 12 

Ships, Coffin 3 11 

Unsound Document, An * (Australian 
Seamen Vote on "One Transport 

Union") 13 6 

Aviators, Insurance for 14 m* 

B 

liabes, Colorado Exploit 10 2 

Battle Cruisers as Liners 23 8 

"Bear" Returns, U. S. Cutter 8 5 

Beware of the Rocks ("Vigilants" Bor- 
ing from Within in the National 
Sailors' and Firemen's L T nion of 

Great Britain) 12 7 

Birds Stowaway on Ships 27 8 

Black Death, The 10 7 

Blanton Is Slipping l ]i 

"Bootlegging" in Baltic 17 2 

Bootstrap Lifters, The 10 9 

Britain, Labor Progress in (Report of 
the Fifty-third Annual Convention 
of the British Trades Union Con- 

gress H) l 

British Influence in Shipping Board 

Revealed by Senator La Follettc.... 3 1 

British Justice in Canada 1 9 

British Seamen Idle 6 6 

British Shipping, Current 2 3 

British Unemployed Problem (by Wil- 
liam Walling) 29 9 



Title x,,, i' ige 

C 

California State Federation of Labor 

Performs * 7 7 

California Workmen's Compensation 

Commission, Report of the 19 2 

Campaign, The Approaching * 31 7 

Canadian Merchant Marine 27 X 

Canadian Seamen, Degrading 4 1 

"Carnegie." The Xon-Magnetic 24 8 

Chicago Convention, On the * 18 6 

Chief Explodes, The * 17 6 

Child Workers, Safeguarding 4 9 

Chili, Abolition of Capital Punishment 

and Flogging in 19 15 

China's Shipping Grows 11 5 

China's Trade, Struggling for 11 9 

Chinese Tie-up, The * 21 7 

Coal Miners' Case. The * 31 7 

Coal Miners' Strike 29 10 

Coal Owners' Tactics 12 7 

Coal vs. The Millennium * 11 6 

Colleges?, Why Labor 15 2 

Commerce Knows No Barrier * 8 7 

Compensation Pays. Workmen's 6 1 

Congratulations Premature * 1 6 

Congress appropriates $20,000,000 to 

Russia's Famine Relief 19 2 

Convict Prospector, A 5 7 

Co-operative Movement, The — 

Babson on Co-operation 28 2 

British Co-operative Wholesale Soci- 
ety. Statistics of the in 15 

Co-operative Fishing Flotilla 25 12 

Co-operatives' Future (by John If. 

Walker) 311 g 

European Co-operative Societies 25 2 

Fallacy of Wage Reductions 19 9 

Court Decisions, Maritime Labor, Etc. 

An Important Decision * (Shipping 
Articles Declared Illegal in the Case 
of Walter Ilelin vs. S. S. "John 

Wortington") 16 6 

Compensation Case of Manual Carcia 

vs. The Western Fuel Company.... 1? 5 
Coronado Coal Company vs. The 

United Mine Workers of America.. 21 8 

Court Is Not a Police Station. A 23 3 

Dissolving a Coal Company Injunc- 
tion 25 12 

Dividends for Workers 2 6 

Induction Method, The 28 9 

Jones Merchant Marine Act (Section 

27) Held Constitutional 28 15 

Leanings of Our Courts 17 7 

Liability Not Limited 7 11 

Profiteers Sentenced 15 ]{) 

Recovers $28,000 Damages ('Nick Hjelt 

vs. S. S. "Bakersfield") 2s 11 

Suit for $100,000 Against the United 

Mine Workers of America Denied.. 11 12 

U. S. Court Decision Aids Profiteers. 1 5 
Well Earned Verdict (Casey and Werf 

vs. Tli.' S. S. "Lake Fondulac") 15 11 

ey's fngenious Scheme, Gen. * 29 7 

Cultivate Its Growth * 8 6 

Curious Incident. A * 2 r ' 7 

Current Events 2 6 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL [N DEX— VOLUME THIRTY-FiVE 



Title No. Page 

D 

Danish Merchant Marine 28 8 

Defending Our Liberties 9 1 

Democracy. "Safe" for 18 9 

Denmark. Industrial Situation in 9 7 

Departmental Orders 7 

Disarmament Conference 17 9 

Disarmament, Labor for 6 3 

Disarmament. Labor for (by Daniel J. 

Tobin ) 11 2 

Disarmament, Labor's Need for 12 11 

E 

Economic Information 13 9 

Economic Situation Improving, Scandi- 
navian 8 9 

Editor. Troubles of An 13 7 

Education". Why v 29 8 

light-hour Law in Spain 17 9 

Lngineers Are O. K. * 1 7 

.^quality .Before trie Law (by, Victor A. 

/: : OkjnjlerJ /V .*.!; 16 7 

' E(*ualiz'ifg"'S4am"ei1's Wages (by Paul 

.... S, Taylor) 27 1 

>^4»nj>le ot .JSeft-lJeij;" An * 20 7 

'Ex'if the ■Saifor'vby £• Harms I 7 9 

Expensive Privilege * (Narcotics Smug- 
gled by Chinese Crews of the "State" 

Ships) 30 6 

Explorer Pays Novel Fare 8 3 

Evading Real Issues (An Address on 
Limitation of Armaments by Sen- 
ator Borah) 16 9 

F 

hair Dealing Leads to Success 19 8 

Farmers Are Aroused 9 2 

Federal Reserve Act vs. Labor 13 2 

Fields for Exploitation 9 9 

Films, Shun Unfair 17 2 

Finnish Unemployed Problem 30 9 

Fireman," The "Marine 26 7 

Fishermen's Death List. Alaska 29 11 

Foreign Intrigue Exposed (British In- 
fluence in the U. S. Shipping Board 

Revealed by Senator La Follette).. 3 1 

Foreign Loans 13 9 

Forests, Heavy Ancient 14 8 

French Labor Awakens 6 11 

French Mercantile Marine 26 8 

Fuel for Ships. New 17 2 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles by, Etc. — 

Analysis of the Pacific Coast Ship- 
owners' Pamphlet 24 1 

Comment on Marine Transport Work- 
s' Industrial Union of Argentine. 28 7 
Preamble of the Industrial Workers of 

the World Analyzed 25 1 

Seamen Labor to Organize 12 1 

Shipowner-' Queer Policies 15 1 

Sixth of March Message 27 7 

Sound Warning. A (State of Califor- 
nia Criminal Syndicalism Act De- 
fined) 13 1 

"Square Deal" Analyzed, The 25 6 

Thought and Comment 1 1 7 

G 

Gandhi's India. Mahatma 19 8 

German Seamen, Pay of 14 2 

German Shipping Grows 1 9 

Germain. Peace With 10 11 

Germany, Unemployment in IS 9 

Getting Busy * 1 7 

Good Old Days, The * 22 7 

Government by Gunmen Rule 22 10 

Government by the People * (Senator 

Newberry's Election) 23 6 

rnments, Dr. Nansen Scores Pitiless 10 8 
Great Britain, View of Industrial Con- 
ditions in (by Seebohm Rowntree) . . 16 1 

svenor," Mystery of 18 8 

H 

'Hands Across the Sea" * 11 7 

Health Hints * 3 6 

History Repeats Itself! (100 Moplah 
Prisoners Suffocated in a British 

Railway Wagon) ....- 16 8 

History Repeats Itself?. Will 30 7 

Howat Stands Pat 6 3 

Howat's, Alexander, Address in Court.. 5 8 
Hygienic Improvements (by Soviet Rus- 
sian Medical Relief Committee 8 1 

I 

Illiteracy in Western States 20 9 

Immense Problem, An (Does the White 
Man's Civilization Contain Germs 
for Its Destruction?) 18 7 



Title No. Page 

In Again and Out Again * 20 6 

In the Role of Judas 3 9 

Independence Required * 9 6 

India, Mahatma Gandhi's 19 8 

India Welcomes the Prince 18 9 

Industrial Accident Commission. Report 

of the State of California 26 8 

Industrial Conditions (by H. J. Con- 
way) 17 9 

Industrial Conditions in Great Britain.. 16 1 
"Industrial Councils'' (by Victor A. 

Olander) '. 14 7 

Industrial Court Law. Kansas (bv Mat- 
thew W'oll) 18 1 

Industrial Readjustment (by Er. Harms) 1 8 

Injunctions — 

Brotherhood of Paper Makers vs. In- 
ternational Paper Company 26 4 

Court Is Not a Police Station. A 23 3 

Dismissal of the Injunction Applica- 
tion of the Kansas City Motion 
Picture Machine Operators' Union.. 23 4 
Equality Before the Law (by Victor 

A. Olander) 16 7 

Injunction Against Employers 16 8 

Injunction Denied (Pacific Coast Coal 

Company Application for Injunction) 6 2 

Injunction Judge Rules, An (the 
Truax Case Handed Down by Chief 

Justice Taft) 17 7 

Injunction Weapon. The 18 9 

Injunction Wheels Turned ( Interna- 
tional Ladies' Garment Workers' 
Union vs. The New York Cloak. 
Suit and Skirt Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation 22 7 

Jefferson and Injunctions 20 11 

Picketing Stopped by Federal Judge.. 28 3 

Recalling Feudal Days 25 9 

Taft Wants Direct Action?, Does Mr. 20 9 

Torture Instrument. A 23 8 

Insurance for Aviators 14 8 

Intellectuals in the Ranks (by Victor S. 

Varros) 14 1 

International Mercantile Marine Com- 
pany Contract, To Probe 2 7 

International Seamen's Code 1 2 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

"Chief Explodes." The * 17 6 

Convention Call 6 7 

Equalization of Seamen's Wages 
Under the La Eollettc Act (by 

Paul S. Taylor) 27 1 

Grave Indictment. A * 31 6 

On the Chicago Convention * 18 6 

Seamen in Convention, The (A Sy- 
nopsis of the Twenty-fifth Annual 

Convention Proceedings) 21-1: 22-1: 23-1 

Section 13, Clarification of 15 7 

Shipowners' Patriotism * 24 6 

Shipowners' Queer Policies (by An- 
drew Furuseth) 15 1 

Why Enact Laws? * (L T nited States 
Shipping Board's Revised Manning 

Scale) ..., 18 6 

' Wobbly" Confession. A * 30 7 

"The Seaman" (Organ of the I. S. I". 

of America) 11 7 

Three Groups of Men. The (by M. A. 

Beauchamp) 27 7 

Unbiased Comparison (by M, A. Beau- 
champ ) 31 9 

Intolerance Retards Progress * 8 6 

I. W. W., Organizing 15 2 

J-K 

Japan, Labor Unions Gaining in 16 9 

Japanese Families in Hawaii, Increase of 17 15 

Japan's Shipping?", Who Aids 19 6 

Joe's Job 9 8 

lones Merchant Marine Act (Section 

27 1 Held Constitutional 28 5 

Judicial Usurpation Proven 1 3 

Justice Denied to Workers (Case of 
Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Van- 

zetti) 1 8 

Kansas Industrial Court Law (by Mat- 
thew Woll) ' IS 2 

King of the Tubai Islands 30 2 

L 

Labor and Psvchologv (bv Prince 

Hopkins) ' 28 1 

Labor and Ship Subsidy (by Paul 

Scharrenberg) 21 7 

Labor, Appeal to Organized 15 11 

Labor Banks, Growth of 11 8 

Labor Bureau. Inc.. Report of 29 8 



Title No. Page 

Labor Collcge>?\ Why (by James H. 

Maurer) 15 2 

Labor Conditions, World's 7 1 

Labor Dailies. A Reason for 6 7 

Labor Day. Child 22 7 

Labor. Federal Reserve Act vs 13 2 

Labor Legislation. Report of the Amer- 
ican Association for 20 7 

Labor Minority in Unemployment Con- 
ference 10 3 

Labor Movement, Aims of the (Vari- 
ous Expression* Found in the Labor 

Press) 17 1 

Labor Movement, American 6 10 

Labor Progress in Britain (Report of 
the Fifty-third Annual Convention 
of the British Trade L'nion Con- 
gress 10 1 

Labor Recede*. The Tide Against 14 11 

Labor Secretary Would Establish Spy 

System 5 11 

Labor, The Fighting Forces of 24 8 

Labor University in Belgium 5 3 

Labor's Weapon 23 7 

La Follette's Address on British In- 
fluence in Shipping Board 3 1 

Language Clause of the La Eollette 

amen's Act of 1915 15 7 

Leprosy in America 28 9 

Liability Not Limited 7 11 

Liberty \*. Action 27 9 

Lloyd's Shipping Statistics 5-3; 20-5; 23-15 

Lockout Facts — • 

Aberdeen Is Interested (by B. L. Bar- 
tells) ' 3 8 

In Review * 1 6 

Lockout Event Reviewed. A 30 1 

Lockout in Denmark 31 12 

Thriving Industry. A * (the Private 

1 )ctective.) 4 6 

Longshoremen Earnest. San Pedro 3 8 

^shoremen's Compensation Bill, 

The * 22 6 

M 

Machinists' Protest. The (by William 

II. Johnstone) 1 2 

Make the Wealthy Pay 8 8 

Manning Scale, The L'. S. Shipping 

Board's New * 18 6 

Marseille, The Port of 9 9 

Mellon's Resignation. Secretary 9 7 

Mercantile Marine. French 26 8 

Merchant Marine. Canadian 27 8 

Merchant Marines, The Three (Norwe- 
gian, Swedish and Danish) 28 8 

Mexico. Workmen's Insurance in (by 

President Alvarado Obregon) 12 8 

Mexico's Twenty-four-hour System of 

Marking Time 25 15 

Militarists Eight for Salaries (bv Don- 
ald Ramsay) ." 18 10 

Miners. Attempt to Break the 31 8 

Miners' Case, The * 31 7 

Moral. Why Be a Pet ? * 1 6 

"Mother" Jones 10 10 

"Where Do They Get It? * (Mexican 

Government's Novel Scheme) 9 6 

N 

Nansen, Dr., Scores Pitiless Govern- 
ments 10 8 

Naval Armament and Piracy 9 7 

Naval Holiday, A 14 9 

Need for Unity, A (by F. Harms) 5 6 

Normalcy by Force * 2 6 

North Dakota, Doings in 13 8 

Norway's Shipping Revives (by Silas 

B. Axtell) 3 9 

Norwegian Merchant Marine 28 8 



Officers Answer Operators (Pamphlet 
issued by Masters, Mates and Pilots 

of the Pacific) 2 8 

Officials Aided by Coolies 9 5 

Oil Workers' Strike 7 8 

Old Salt. The * 18 7 

One Big Union Plan Rejected 16 8 

P-Q 

Packers' Strike. The 19 10 

Palestine Ports and Shipping 12 9 

Panama Canal Statistics 

1-9; 7-11; 18-13; 25-4; 30-14 

Passing the Buck * 6 6 

Peculiar Collision, A (S. S. "Golden 

State" vs. "Nagano Maru") 9 5 



55GG9 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-FIVE 






"Pie-Card" Artist, The * 
Pioneers, The 



No. Page 

14 7 
19 7 



Poetry — 

A Coward's Part (by Ella Wheeler 

Wilcox) 4 6 

Maud By! (by Aii American Girl)... 2 7 

Use Your Head 2 10 

Postage Meter, Automatic 12 13 

Post Office Gag, Repeal 2 2 

President Hardings Message * IS 6 

President Harding's Salary 20 8 

Pre-- Falsity Revealed 6 8 

Profiteers' Tactics, The * 21 6 

Profits of Packers, Huge 6 3 

Profit? of Standard Oil 19 11 

Progress Abroad, Reaction at Home *.. 9 6 

Progress, Intolerance Retards * 8 6 

Pulling Down the Flag 4 9 

Qui er Questionnaire, A 27 10 



Radicals," "Helping the 

Radio. Doctor Prescribes by 7 

Radio Set, Individual Pocket 

Radio Telephone, The 

Railroads and Workers (by Charles M. 

Kelly) 

Railroads' Methods Exposed 

Railroads. Private Operation of (by 

Charles M. Kelly) 

Read and Digest * 

Real Men Needed * 

Reflections of An Old Timer (by J. 

Chaffey) 

" Ri \ olution." Some 

Rivers, The Greatest 

Roumania, Trade Unionism in 

A Sad Loss to Starving 

Russian Xavy, The 

Russians Barter Values 

Russians, Relief for 

Russia's Famine Relief, Congressional 

Appropriation of $20,000,000 19-2; 20-7 



Sailor. Exit the (by F. Harms) 7 9 

Sailors. Preying on Hindu 2?i 7 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 



17 


8 


•9; 


18-7 


29 


5 


28 


9 


1 


1 


17 


2 


27 


2 


31 


7 


4 


6 


4 


9 


20 


8 


14 


2 


23 


9 


20 


7 


14 


2 


2 


7 


10 


3 



Adoption of the Resolution Enforcing 
Article 111, Section 3 of the Con- 
stitution 10 

Along the Waterfront * 26 

Cards on the Table * (Defeat of the 
Proposed Steam-Schooner Agree- 
ment ) 3 

Clarifying the Atmosphere * 12 

Comrade's Question, A (by E. Lohnc) 8 

Curious Incident, A * 29 

Engineers Are O. K. * 1 

Expulsion of John Vance Thompson.. 11 6 

Expulsions 12-7; 13-7; 14-7; 15 

Important Pamphlet, An * 28 

In Again and Out Again * 20 

I n Review * 1 

Journal Changes Hands, The 31 



Onward Spirit, The * 



16 



•Pie-Card" Artist, The * 15 



Profiteers' Tactics, The * 

Read and Digest! * 

Sailors Should Attend Meetings 



21 
31 

5 



Shipowners' Patriotism * 24 

Silver, S. A., Elected Editor pro tern. 
Sixth of March, The 



11 
26 

Sixth of March Celebration * 27 

Square Deal." "A 24 

Test of a Man, The (by J. McKenzie) 1 

Traitors in the Ranks * 13 

Triumph of Sanity * 11 

When Are You Licked? * 15 

Yale the Seamen's Journal * 31 

DECEASED MEMBERS 

Arnold, John 24 

Benton, George W 13 

Brandt, Martin 25 

Breien, 1 tans 24 

Brown, George 18 

John 30 

Campbell, Martin 21 

( arlstrand, Gust 29 

irane, Robert 20 

Dahlin, Gustaf 17 

las, Walter 4 



Title No. Page 

Drake, Albert 11 7 

Eagil, Hans 22 7 

Ericksen, Johan Edwin A 7 7 

Fenly, Thomas F 9 7 

Fostwold, Kaspar 19 7 

Frank, Bernard 7 7 

Fraser, William 6 7 

Gardner, W. H 5 7 

Goldstein, Arend 6 7 

Grant, Otto 31 7 

Grigoleit, Erdmann 14 7 

Hamilton, Walter John 23 7 

Hansen, Anton M 21 7 

Heinrich, Richard 13 7 

Jacobsen, Johan 26 7 

Jacobson, Andrew 19 7 

Johansen, Carsten 3 7 

McCarthy, Dennis 22 7 

Morken, Anton 9 7 

Xickols, George 26 7 

Olsen, John Arnt 7 7 

Petersen, Aage W. E 4 7 

Peterson, Olaf 4 7 

Pottinger, John G 30 7 

Riley, James ' 22 7 

Rosdahl, John 9 7 

Samuelson, Edwin 29 7 

Skubber, I fans 16 7 

Snow. Earl Harold (Erroneously Re- 
ported ) 14 7 

Snow, William 15 7 

Strelneck, Jul 5 7 

Timmerholm, John 12 7 

Walter, Joseph 10 7 

Weaver, John H 15 7 

Wielke, Fred 6 7 

Wirk, Jacob II 16 7 

Salvaging Plan. A Novel 12 8 

San Francisco — 

Along the Waterfront * 26 6 

Approaching Campaign, The * ^1 7 

(ietting Busy * 1 7 

Laudable Efforts * (The Association 
of Surviving Passengers and Crew 

of the S. S. "Alaska") 7 6 

Profiteers' Tactics, The * 21 6 

Ships and Sailors, Movie * 5 6 

Survey of the San Francisco Ray 30 5 

"The Industrial Association" 27 4 

Three Libel Suits Growing Out of -the 

Wreck of the S. S. "Alaska" 12-5; 13-5 

Seamen's Act — See International Sea- 
men's Union of America; also Court 
Decisions. 

Scheme Fraught with Danger, A * 25 6 

Sea, A Romance of the 30 X 

Sea. Disturbancs of the 9 X 

Seamen, Degrading Canadian 4 1 

Seamen Are Handy Men (by. F. Harms) 8 8 

Seamen. Fabricating 8 5 

Seamen Will Look Ahead * 9 6 

Seamen's Code, International 1 ' 2 

Seas Were Named, How the Color 3 9 

Shackleton, Sir Ernest, Antarctic Ex- 
ploration 16 11 

Shameful Event, A * 4 7 

Sharp Edge Tools * 10 6 

"Ship-Mindedness" 13 7 

Ship, The World's Largest (S. S. "Bis- 

mark") 30 15 

Shipowners' Queer Policies (Andrew 
Furuseth's Letter to Pacific Coast 

Shipowners) 15 1 

Shipping in U. S. Ports 2 3 

Shipping Losses, War-time 13 X 

Shipping, World's Mercantile 5 3 

Ships at a Dollar a Month 10 9 

Ship Subsidy, Etc.— 

A "Ship Subsidy" Debate 20 1 

Conspiring with Japanese 25 7 

Dollar, Capt. Robert, on Ship Subsidy 

(Along the Wicked Path *) 30 6 

Do We Need a Subsidy? * 14 6 

Fraud, The Ship Subsidy * 20 6 

Gen. Coxey's Ingenious Scheme * ... 29 7 
Labor and Ship' Subsidy (by Paul 

Scharrenberg ) 21 7 

Labor Opposes Subsidy Hill 3(1 3 

Labor's Support Not for Sale * 31 6 

Scheme Fraught with Danger, A * ... 25 6 

Ship Subsidy Hill Analyzed 29 1 

Ship Subsidy Bill 28-10; 29-10 

Ship Subsidy Rill, The * 29 6 

Ship Subsidy Grab, The 31 6 

Ship Subsidy Hearings 31 10 

Ship Subsidy Oracle, The * 31 7 



Title No. Page 

Ship Subsidy vs. The Profits * 28 6 

The Ship Subsidy Message * (Presi- 
dent Harding's Subsidy Address)... 27 6 

Slight Consolation * 9 6 

Snow Men, The 15 9 

Sound Reasoning 18 7 

Square Deal," "A 24 6 

Steamer's Interesting Career * 19 7 

Steering Requires Practice * 2 6 

Strike. Airplanes Settle * (South African 

Miners) 30 7 

Suez Canal, Statistics of 4 7 

Swedish Freeport Completed 8 2 

Swedish Merchant Marine 28 8 



Taxation — 

Burdening the Poor 24 9 

Peculiarities 6 10 

Taxpayers' Leagues vs. The Kansas 

Industrial Court Expenses'. 20 13 

Tax System, Big Business Urges Im- 
perialistic 8 3 

Tenancv Menace, Exit the (by D. Mac- 

Kenzie) 31 10 

Towing Feat, Remarkable (Towing the 

Bottomless S. S. "F. I. Asche").... 23 9 
Three Groups of Men (by M. A. Reau- 

champ) 27 7 

Trade Unionism vs. Paternalism 5 7 

Treaty Pen, Union-made 31 9 

Triumph of Sanity * 11 6 

U-V 

Unbiased Comparison (by M. A. Beau- 
champ) 31 9 

Unemployed Problem, British (by Win. 

Walling) 29 9 

Unemployed Problem, Finnish 30 9 

Unemployment Conference, Labor Mi- 
nority in 10 3 

Unemployment Grows Serious 2 1 

Unemployment in California 10 6 

Unemployment in Germany 15-9; 20-12 

Unemployment, Preventing 11 9 

Unemployment, Silk Hosiery and 5 9 

Union, Another "Company" * 19 6 

Union Method, The Trade 23 8 

Union Shop and Freedom 14 9 

Union Slacker, The Trade 25 2 

Union, Stand by Your 25 9 

Unionism in Roumania 23 9 

Unions, Destroying • 16 2 

United States Shipping Board — 

British Influence in Shipping Board 
(An Address by Senator Robt. M. 

La Follette) 3 1 

Injurious Competition 10 5 

Italy's Claims Against the Shipping- 
Board 24 14 

Sale of the Wooden Hulls on the 

Pacific Coast 26 5 

Shipping Roard Freighters to be 

Painted in Uniform Colors 18 5 

Shipping R.oard's New Plans 11 5 

Shipping Board to Probe Alien Con 

tracts 10 7 

Shipping Board to Sell Supplies 8 2 

Shipping Roard Vessels One-third 

Junk 6 9 

Why Enact Laws? * (Revised Man- 
ning Scale) 18 6 

Unsound Document, An * 13 6 

Vale the Seamen's Journal * 31 6 

W 

Wage Laws, Minimum 4 7 

Wage Reduction Notions 27 8 

Wage ' Reductions, Fallacy of (by N. 

Rappaport ) 19 9 

Wages, Equalizing Seamen's (by Paul 

S. Taylor) 17 1 

Wall Street Bomb Plot 17 10 

Wall Street Grab 8 X 

War Against War 8 2 

Wars and "Propaganda" 11 9 

Washington Letter, Our — See issues 1 

to 31. 

Whale, Grounding of a 16 9 

\\ hat Dues It Mean? * 5 6 

What Is Life? 5 9 

Who Pays the Rill? * 15 

"Wobbly" Confession, A * 30 7 

Workmen's Compensation Pays 6 1 

Workmen's Insurance in Mexico 12 S 

Workers' future at Stake 31 

World'- Mercantile Shipping 5 3 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-FIVE 



Title 
Wrecks — 


No. Page 
10 5 


Title 
1 larvard 


No. 

16 


l'age 

5 
5 

15 
5 

15 
14 


Title 
Milkmaid 


X 




Honevmoon 


13 


Northern Pacific 


24 3 


Carrier Dove 


ward Parks 

Kaun Marti 

Majestic 


27 

14 

3 


Ottawa 




Clinton 


20 5 

8-5; 19-5 

31 12 


2 : 5 


Planter 


14 




Santa Rita (Posted Missing)... 


14-5 




18 8 


Memphis 


23 


->; ; 










FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXV, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1921. 



Whole No. 1769. 



AlILROADS AMD WO: 



Attftiitodl© off C@img|ire©s Places Pir©p©iptty Befoir© Irtoinnisiim JRIstflhils 



In furnishing information to the public re- 
garding legislative activities of "big business," 
the Plum Plan League reveals some very in- 
teresting side-lights on the inclinations of our 
representatives in Congress. 

While appropriations, equivalent to raids on 
the National Treasury, are rushed through when 
they benefit a few special privileged interests, 
expenditures are jealously guarded when the wel- 
fare of the people as a whole is at stake. 

The following elucidates the prevailing situa- 
tion at Washington, D. C: 



(By Charles M. Kelley) 

The bill giving $500,000,000 to the railroads, 
for no better reason than that the railway 
managers asked for it, has been approved by 
the House of Representatives. When it came 
from committee, House leaders sidetracked 
a mass of important legislation and gave their 
exclusive attention to a subject that at best 
will benefit but a small group of citizens. 

No opporunity was presented for a free dis- 
cussion of the merits of this colossal raid upon 
the Treasury, consideration being confined to 
four hours. The opposition was gagged while 
the proponents of the measure drove it through 
under whip and spur. 

There was time, however, for a few clear- 
thinking members of Congress to tear away the 
cloak of hypocrisy and misrepresentation that 
has obscured the real object of this grant. All 
pretense that it was intended to help the un- 
employment situation was abondoned by its 
supporters when they were given a chance to 
prove their good faith with the public. 

The suggestion was made that it be made a 
condition of this subsidy that it shall be 
expended, in part at least, in repairing the 
railroad's motive power and for maintenance, 
that the carriers may be in shape to meet the 
Nation's transportation needs when called upon 
to do so. This proposal did not reach first 
base, however, for the gentlemen who engi- 
neered the deal knew that the managers do not 
intend to make use of the Government's gen- 
erosity for any such purpose. The money is to 
aid speculation, to give the bankers and other 
insiders a new lease on riotous contracts and 
grafts. 

Further, the Senate has postponed action on 
the bill until after recess, which will put it 
off until tire middle of October, at the very 
earliest. The prospects are that it will not have 
final action until after the first of the year. 
That, of course, precludes the possibility that 
the money that is to be made available can be 
devoted to any constructive program. What 
is done to improve transportation conditions 
and also the condition of millions of workers 
must be done at once. January will be too late 
to rescue either the railroads or their employes. 
The managers are aware of this fact and so arc 
Congressmen, but they follow through with their 
game of make-believe and expect the public to 
fall for it, without protest. 

Thomas DeWitt Cuyler, president of the 
Association of Railway Executives, let the "cat 
out of the bag" the other day when he stated 
that the railroads were not making the return 



guaranteed by the Cummjns-Esch bill. When 
the year is ended the carriers will be just 
about $500,000,000 short of the sum needed to 
pay an average 6 per cent dividend. With re- 
markable foresight, the speculator-bankers who 
dominate the railroad situation have made pro- 
vision for dividend requirements long before 
the real need for them arrives. The easy grace 
with which they consented to a postponement 
of final action until after Congress reconvenes 
is abundant evidence that the plea that funds 
were required to get the railroads in shape 
was put out for public consumption, to make 
it easier for subservient Congress to justify 
their betrayal with their constituents. 

Look? Like Boodle 

Let this deal be understood for what it is. 
It is a flagrant and deliberate misappropriation 
of the public money, at a time when the 
Nation is straining every financial resource to 
make ends meet. It takes from the Treasury 
a half billion dollars when Treasury notes in 
reams are being passed over to bankers. It 
puts the Government behind a small interest at 
the sacrifice of all the rest of the people. 

Congressmen will have right-sounding fairy 
tales for the people back home, but it will be 
proven again, as it was shown when the full 
iniquity of the Cummins-Esch Act was re- 
vealed, that Congress, as now constituted, is 
simply an adjunct to Wall street, registering 
its will with such painful regularity that there 
is a danger of irreparable injury being done be- 
fore the public has its innings. 

Congress has sacrificed the national interest, 
turned its back upon the farmers and millions 
of unemployed workers, has neglected every- 
thing that it might consolidate its attention 
upon the railroad problem, which is a problem 
only in the sense that certain interests are 
sicking to gain everything they covet without 
being compelled to go to the length of psysi- 
cally breaking into the Nation's treasury. 
Relief of the Unemployed 

The good faith of Congress will be put to 
test when it disposes of a resolution now 
before it appropriating $500,000,000 for the 
relief of unemployed men and women. In a 
statement submitted by Secretary of Labor 
Davis, in response to a request from Congress, 
that official declares that practically 6,000,000 
workers are now idle. In addition, millions are 
engaged but part time. Widespread distress 
prevails. With winter approaching, this situa- 
tion will be more acute. Those who profess to 
be able to forecast the future have no hope 
of an early revival of trade and industry. By 
g ineral consent it is admitted that the outlook 
is anything but reassuring. 

If anything is to be done to help matters, it 
must be done on a large scale. The piecemeal 
relief work undertaken by individual communi- 
docs not meet the situation. The national 
Government alone can step into the breach and 
avert catastrophic developments that arc appre- 
hended. 

A pretense of helping the farmers has been 
made, but it is merely a gesture. When the 
legislation that has been enacted is applied it 



will likely be discovered that the promised 
help of agriculturists is really an extension of 
opportunity for the middlemen. Nevertheless, 
Congress has felt impelled to give heed to the 
clamors of farmers and has for the moment 
silenced the bitter criticism that was coming to 
it from all sections of the country. 

The tax bill and the tariff are designed to 
relieve business from some of its burdens. The 
latter are to be transferred to the backs of 
the masses. 

The railroads arc coming in for most gen- 
erous attention. They are getting everything 
they demand. The half-billion subsidy is to 
be followed by other grants, when and as they 
are needed. 

But the worker has been overlooked, or was 
forgotten until Representative London, of New 
\ ork. offered a resolution appropiating in their 
behalf the identical sum of money that Congress 
was handing oyer to the railroads. It will be 
well worth noting the experience of this resolu- 
tion as it negotiates the devious pitfalls of 
Congress. 

If any person imagines that Congress will 
approve the resolution, or any similar sug- 
gestion, he is a candidate for an insane asylum. 
It hasn't a chance. It never had a chance. 
Congress isn't built that way. Six million men 
and women may continue to walk the streets, 
may starve, may fall down and be lost forever, 
without stirring in the hearts of Congressmen 
a sympathetic emotion. 

That may sound harsh, but it is the simple, 
unadulterated truth. Those who have listened 
to the defamation and villification of workers 
that feature every debate know how the legis- 
lative and executive departments of our Gov- 
ernment react to the cry of distress — when it 
comes from those who toil. 

In Washington, in official quarters, there is a 
sincere conviction that workers arc suffering 
for excesses committed in the past. The aver- 
. age legislator sincerely believes that he is be- 
ing compelled to starve because of something 
he did, or failed to do, during the past three 
or four years. To interfere with matters, there- 
fore, argues your lawmaker, would be a trans- 
gression upon the divine prerogative. He just 
simply cannot think about doing anything to 
help men and women whose only crime is that 
they produced abundantly and created great 
blessings and then asked that they might share 
some of them. 

Wall street gets its billions — the workers get 
a swift kick for even asking for anything. That 
is the cold, brutal fact of the matter. 

Congress wouldn't appropriate 5 cents to help 
the workers unless the money first passed 
through the hands of the powerful interests 
that maintain large lobbies here to direct li 
lation. 

"Let the worker starve — he's used to it,'' is 
what a majority of Congressmen tell each other 
wdien the unpleasant subject of unemployment 
obtrudes, as it will in spite of anything that is 
done to sidetrack it. 

Billions for privilege, but not a penny to re- 
lieve privation — that is the moral perspective 
of the back-to-normalcy philosophy. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE MACHINISTS' PROTEST 
(By William II. Johnston) 



The President of the International Associa- 
tion of Machinists cites objections to Senate 
Bill 2337; providing for sale of railroad securi- 
ties by the Government in order to pay railroad 
claims. 

The objection of the International Associa- 
tion of Machinists to Senate Bill 2337, provid- 
ing for the sale of Government securities in 
order to provide funds with which to pay rail- 
road claims, is not based upon any narrow and 
technical criticism of the specific provisions of 
this legislation, but vests rather upon broad 
grounds of equity and justice as between the 
railroads and the Government and people of the 
United States. 

We are unable to understand, in the first 
place, why when, as is admitted, the railroads 
owe the Government amounts reaching to hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars, this indebdtedness 
should not be offset against the claims of the 
railroads and the balance settled by whatever 
method seems most expeditious. As we under- 
stand the proposed transaction, the Government 
is to accept from the railroads their notes and 
other securities as representing their indebted- 
ness to the Government for expenditures which 
were made on their behalf during the period 
of Federal control. The Government is then to 
sell these securities and pay the proceeds to the 
railroads in settlement of their claims. We do 
not pretend to have explored all the depths of 
high finance, where alone justification for this 
remarkable transaction can be found, but we can 
say, with great earnestness, that if Congress 
should decide to pass this bill as it stands, it 
will awaken bitter resentment on the part of 
the people of the United States who earn their 
daily bread by toil. You can never make the 
people of the United States believe that it is 
right for the Government to be forced to pay 
the claims of the raliroads in cash while it 
allows payment of the Government claims 
-t the railroads to be postponed for ten 
years. 

We wish also to protest against the railroads 
receiving special favors from the Government 
and bavins special legislation enacted for their 
benefit, when they are engaged in violating Acts 
of Congress and defying the tribunal created by 
Congress for the adjustment of their relations 
with their employes. This can be verified by a 
reference to the attitude of the Pennsylvania, 
the A. B. & A. and other roads in defying the 
Railroad Labor Board. 

We also protest against the proposal to place 
enormous sums of money at the disposal of the 
railroads, when it has been proved by the 
sworn testimony of the railway executives them- 
selves that during the period of Government 
guarantee, when the Government was pouring 
out millions for the alleged benefit of the rail- 
roads, this money was being used not to im- 
prove the condition of the roads, but was 
squandered and grossly wasted in swelling the 
coffers of equipment and repairs companies, in 
which the financial masters of the railroads were 
interested, by contracts made at exorbitant 
juices for the repair of locomotives and other 
rolling stock. The investigation made by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission has shown 
that a number of roads, such as the Pennsyl- 
vania and the New York Central, which have 
been most persistent in their attempts to secure 
gratuities and favors from Congress, deliberately 
wasted many millions of dollars in excessive 
contracts with outside repair companies in which 
"insiders" were interested, while they were dis- 
charging their own employes by the thousand 
and driving them upon the streets in order to 
create a situation of unemployment and indus- 
trial distress in which they could hope easily 
to force a drastic reduction of wages. It can 
be shown also from this investigation that, 
while these roads were discharging their 
employes by the thousands and were making 
a pica of dire poverty and distress to Con- 
gress, they raised the salaries of their ex- 
ecutive officers by amounts ranging as high 
as $25,000 a year for individual officers. This 
investigation of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission was undertaken largely at the instance 
of the International Association of Machinists, 
which presented to the Interstate Commerce 
Commission and brought to the attention of 
certain members of Congress evidence proving 
that the railroads were deliberately defrauding 
the Government and robbing the Treasury of 
the United States through these excessive and 
fraudulent contracts. In urging this investiga- 
tion the Railway Employes were not actuated by 
i interests, but were moved by what they 
i'l to be the broadest public interest. 
We hold that before the railroads which have 
participated in this outrageous conspiracy to 
defraud the Government have any further legis- 
lation enacted for their benefit, they should be 
"lied to pay into tin- Treasury of the 
United States the amounts by which these con- 
tracts have been proved by the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission to be excessive. In the case 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad alone this amounts 
proximately $3,21)11.111 hi, representing an ad- 
mittedly excessive cost of $16,000 on each of 
two hundred locomotives. 

We understand that the proceeds of the sale 



of securities authorized by this Act are to be 
used for payment of the railroad claims against 
the Government. Among these claims arc 
enormous sums based upon alleged inefficiency 
of labor. We denounce all claims based upon 
alleged inefficiency of labor as false and fradu- 
lent, and are prepared to show from the sworn 
records of the railroads themselves as tiled with 
the Interstate Commerce Commission, that 
there was no inefficiency of labor during the 
period of Federal control, but that upon the con- 
trary the railway employes, spurred on by the 
high spirit of patriotism, actually performed 
greater service per man per hour than during 
the pre-war period. They did this in spite of 
the fact that hundreds of thousands of railway 
employes volunteered or were drafted for ser- 
vice abroad, and that the ranks of railroad labor 
during the war were therefore diluted with a 
large number of inexperienced men and un- 
trained women, who could not be expected to 
perform the service formerly rendered by those 
who had entered the military service of their 
country. We bitterly resent this attempt to 
besmirch the reputation and character of the 
railway employes of the United States. We 
charge that these claims based upon alleged in- 
efficiency of labor were not filed in good faith 
by the railroad companies, but were deliberately 
manufactured with the idea of prejudicing the 
public against the railway employe. 

We are now told that the railroad companies 
have generously agreed to withhold for the 
present these fraudulent claims based upon al- 
leged inefficiency of labor as a condition to the 
passage of the present resolution. This in itself 
is a most remarkable attempt to blackmail Con- 
gress, and we cannot but believe that Senators 
and Representatives will bitterly resent it. 
Furthermore, we do not understand that under 
any conditions the railroads will agree to drop 
these claims finally. We have read the passage 
in the President's message to Congress of July 
26, 1921, in which he says: "In order to ex- 
pedite settlement and funding, an informal 
understanding which is all that is possible or 
practical, has been reached, under which the 
railway claims based on the 'inefficiency of 
labor' are to be waived to hasten complete and 
final settlements, without surrender of any 
rights in Court in case there is failure to settle. 
This merely means that the railroads have 
agreed to take as much cast as they can get 
from the executive branches of the Government 
and then go into Court to sue in interminable 
litigation for the full amount of all these claims 
based upon "blue sky" and manufactured 
theories. 

We have had experience with the violation by 
certain of the railroads of formal understand- 
ings and even of written agreements. We can 
not, therefore, accept with any degree of assur- 
ance their "informal understanding - ' that these 
claims are to be waived. 

We urge, therefore, that this legislation should 
not pass until Congress has satisfied itself fully 
and beyond any possibility of mistake that these 
claims based on alleged inefficiency of labor and 
other unsubstantial theories and false premises 
have been completely wiped out, never to be 
renewed. 

Finally, we wish to protest against this pro- 
posed Act as class legislation. We railway 
employes have heard much of class legislation 
all our lives. Whenever we have asked that the 
railroad be forced to operate with due regard to 
the safety of the public and their employes, we 
have been met with the shout that this was 
class legislation. When we asked for some 
means of protecting our fellow workers from 
being required to toil for twenty-four or forty- 
eight hours consecutively we were blocked for 
many long years by the plea that this was class 
legislation, although the chief benefit to be de- 
rived from it accrued to the safety of the travel- 
ing public, whose lives were being endangered 
by the employment of men exhausted by ex- 
cessive hours of toil. So when every piece of 
legislation, even that for the inspection of 
boilers, has been before Congress, we have had 
to face a blatant propaganda financed by the 
railroads that we were seeking class legislation, 
when we were merely attempting to save our 
lives and those of the traveling public from 
disasters which were inevitable under the condi- 
tions maintained by the railroads when they 
were permitted to operate their roads as they 
saw fit and without regard to the safety of life 
or limb. 

We denounce the proposed bill as class legis- 
lation, which will inure to the benefit of only 
that small group of stockholders and bond- 
holders, who, after all, constitute only a minute 
fraction of the people of the United States, and 
are insignificant in comparison with the millions 
whose lives are given to the actual operation of 
the railroads. 

When the ordinary citizen or private business 
corporation has a claim against the Government, 
he is obliged by law to go through the Court 
of Claims and secure a judicial finding as to 
the amount due him. Even then, Congress does 
not automatically appropriate funds to pay the 
amount determined, but acting under its con- 
stitutional authority, makes or withholds the 
appropriation as it sees fit. In this case, Con- 
gress is being placed in the position of making 
hundreds of millions of dollars available for the 
settlement of railroad claims upon the sole dis- 



cretion of tin Director General of Railroads, in 
advance of the actual settlement of such claims, 
and without any power to review such settle- 
ments after they are made. 

This is class legislation with a vengeance. 
The Government made no such gratuitous pro- 
visions for the benefit of any other class of its 
citizens, and we do not believe that it should 
arry out this extraordinary transaction for 
the benefit of railroad stockholders and bond- 
holders. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S CODE 



The agenda for the Second Session of 
the General Conference of the Interna- 
tional Labor Organization of the League 
of Nations, held at Genoa from June 
15 to July 10. 1920. included, inter 
alia: "consideration of the possibility 
of drawing up an International Seamen's 
Code." The Conference adopted a recom- 
mendation to the effect that each member 
01 the International Labor Organization 
should "undertake the embodiment in a 
Seamen's Code of all its laws and regula- 
tions relating to stamen in their activities 
as such." The International Labour Office 
was also requested to undertake the neces- 
sary investigations for establishing an In- 
ternational Seamen's Code. 

In order to facilitate the accomplish- 
ment of these two tasks, the International 
Labor Office has published a volume of 
174 pages, containing all the documents 
bearing on this question. These include 
the questionnaire, which contains the fol- 
lowing questions: (1) What measures 
have already been taken or are contem- 
plated by your Government for the estab- 
lishment of the national codes called for 
by tin- recommendation of the Genoa Con- 
ference? i2 » What is the opinion of 
your Government with regard to the pro- 
gramme of work approved by the Joint 
Maritime Commission in connection with 
the elaboration of the International Sea- 
men's Code? (3) What preliminary sug- 
gestions has your Government to make in 
connection with the International Sea- 
men's Code bearing upon seamen's articles 
of agreement? The questionnaire is ad- 
dressed to the various Governments before 
the Genoa Conference: the opinions ex- 
pressed by the Government as to the 
sibility of drawing up an International 
Seamen's Code, and the principles upon 
which it should be constructed; the re- 
port of the Commission set up by the Con- 
erence to study this question ; a precis 
of the record of the discussion which took 
place at the plenary meeting of the Con- 
erence and the definite texts of the resolu- 
tion and recommendation adopted; the 
record of the first session of the Joint 
Maritime Commission, at which the pro- 
cedure to be followed by the International 
Labor Office in the preparation of the 
draft code was discussed : the report and 
draft code prepared by a French Commis- 
sion of representatives of shipowners and 
seamen and of jurists and officials which 
sat in 1913 and 1914; and lastly, an his- 
torical note on former maritime codes. 

The concluding chapter of the volume 
contains the text of a questionnaire drawn 
up by the International Labor Office- and 
i-sued to the Governments concerned. It 
is expected that the replies received will 
enable the Office to present a report on 
the question id' an International Seamen's 
Code to the third si ssioti of the Confer- 
ence to be held at Geneva in October 
next. 



Demand the Union Label. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



CHINESE LEAK THROUGH 



There are strong evidences of a plot to 
smuggle Asiatics into this country 
through San Francisco. 

During the first six months of this year 
364 coolies are known to have escaped 
from passenger liners lying in this port. 

The exact number of Chinese gaining 
illegal entrance into this country from 
vessels at this port is unknown. The im- 
migration authorities, however, have the 
names and identification data on nearly 
four hundred who landed since last Jan- 
uary, and, so far, are at liberty. 

From $500 to $1000 is being paid for 
each Celestial who is safely landed. So 
successful have been the operations that 
immigration officials are of the opinion 
that there is an international ring, with 
their Occidental headquarters located in 
San Francisco. 

Many Chinese who have gained illegal 
entrance through this port were seamen 
on trans-Pacific liners calling here from 
Oriental ports. They were permitted to 
go ashore on the strength of seamen's 
certificates, which permitted them to leave 
the vessel while the craft was in port. 
This certificate, however, gave them no 
permanent privilege to remain. 

Before a vessel leaves port an immigra- 
tion official boards the craft and checks 
up the personnel of aliens employed by the 
steamer. This process of tabulation dur- 
ing the last six months has shown the 
wholesale desertions from vessels in this 
port and the ability of the Chinese to 
remain here undetected. The success of 
these coolies to remain here, suggests 
confederates or an existing ring to aid in 
concealing their presence after landing. 

Formerly the companies or the captain 
of a vessel was required to put up a 
bond with the immigration authorities for 
$500 to cover the seamen on board. This 
was later rescinded, and the master of a 
vessel or the company is no longer held 
responsible for the desertions. 

Immigration officials are unable to de- 
termine the number of Chinese who have 
gained entrance into this port from ves- 
sels by other means, but it is believed 
that the operations of trafficking in coolies 
is now being carried out on a scale larger 
than ever before attempted 



JUDICIAL USURPATION PROVEN 



New Jersey citizens have discovered that 
"judicial usurpation" is a reality, and not 
a supposed figure of speech used by agi- 
tators. 

Federal District Judge Rellstab is re- 
sponsible for the awakening. He has 
raised car fares to 8 cents with a 2-cent 
transfer privilege. 

The State Public Utility Commission re- 
fused to increase rates after an exhaustive 
examination and hearings on the subject. 
The company appealed to Judge Rellstab 
that their property was being confiscated. 
The Court held that this was a violation 
of the United States Constitution, and 
without hearings, granted the company's 
request. 

Judge Rellstab's decision has excited 
everyone but trade unionists, who ask: 
"What do you expect, when you fail to 
protest when these courts annul guaran- 
tees against workers?" 



L. J. Russell, editor of the Newark 
Morning Ledger, in a signed statement, 
declares that Judge Rellstab "should be 
impeached and removed from office in 
order that the public at large may not 
come to feel that too many of our courts 
are filled with servile puppets only too 
ready to serve special interests." 

No trade unionist ever uttered a more 
bitter attack on courts which are de- 
clared to "have ceased to be institutions 
that are impersonal and sacred in their 
nature. 

"It is the height of ridiculous absurdity 
to expect people who know the source and 
the pedigree and the caliber of so many 
of our judges to have the slightest respect 
for them or confidence in them or their 
rulings and decisions when the issue in- 
volved is that of a utility corporation or a 
special privilege group that knows exactly 
what it wants and how to get it. 

"Such danger as confronts our institu- 
tions today in this republic begins and 
ends with the arbitrary abuse of judicial 
power nullifying all laws in a flagrant 
disregard of public right in order to serve 
private rights and special privileges. 

"Our institutions are in a thousand fold 
greater danger from a P>ergen and a 
Rellstab than they are from a thousand 
I '.ill Haywoods and Emma Goldmans. 

"The good sense and patriotism of the 
people constitute an adequate antidote for 
the poison of the bolshevik, but there is no 
antidote for public respect and esteem and 
patriotism that is destroyed through ig- 
norant or corrupt courts that arc beyond 
the reach of the people. 

"Let us repeat that as a choice between 
being in contempt of a court and a court 
in contempt of the public, all the danger 
lies in the latter alternative. 

"Let us repeat that the courts constitute 
the greatest menace that confronts this 
republic and the only remedy lies in elec- 
tive courts by the people as against ap- 
pointive courts by politicians for corpora- 
tions. 

"Let us repeat that we have no law 
today except court-made law; that we have 
no liberties or rights except those resting 
on the whims of the prejudices and the 
ignorance and corruption of too many of 
our courts under politically appointive 
tenure in office." 



WHAT DO THEY MEAN? 

What exactly do the fat people mean 
when they urge the workers to thrift? A 
man earning wages can, by pinching him- 
self and his family, and with specially 
good luck, save in a lifetime as much 
money as a perfectly idle capitalist may 
add to his bank account in one day. The 
point about the advice is that once a man 
has been "thrifty" for a few years, he 
gives up the effort to get rich that way, 
and starts out to exploit his neighbors. 
Under a decent, humane system there 
should be no need for thrift. — Job Harri- 
man. 

A situation which is giving a measure 
of comfort to the wage slave these days 
is the manner in which the aristocrats of 
a few European countries are compelled 
to "hit the grit." The latest report from 
London states that "the head of the heredi- 
tary reigning house of Poland is working- 
his passage across the Atlantic on a White 
Star liner. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia— 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adeliade, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 14-16 Central Building, 41 
North John Street, Liverpool. 
BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 

Transportarbeiter Verband, Reichsabteilung 
Seeleute. Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, 
Germany. 

FRANCE 
General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan 7, 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 
Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Langgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbogade, 15 Copen- 
hagen. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Copenhagen. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, L. Strand- 
strade 20, Copenhagen. 

HOLLAND 

Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

ITALY 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Corso Principe Odone 2, Genoa, Italy. 
SPAIN 
Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocincros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle 
Inglaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Rcmadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Fognistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedistinos 18, Rio de Janeiro 
SOUTH AFRICA 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



T 1 1 K S E AMF.X'S JOURNAL 



l^timiitimtiHimHiummji^iiui 

Pacific Coast Marine 

^miiiimiiiimiiiiniimimnnimmiiniimiiiiiinmtiniiiiiiiii' 

• 

Completing the trip from Yoko- 
hama to Victoria, B. C, in nine days 
and eighteen hours, the Shipping 
Board's steamer Silver Si 
cently made what is considered a 
record run for an American ship on 
that route. 

Reports that the Standard I >il 
Company was planning to replace 
its present deck sailors and firemen 
with Chinese were denied recently 
by officials of the company. N"<> 
Chinese will be employed on vi 
operated l>y the Standard Oil I 
pany i alifornta, the of 

stated. 

San Diego reports that the Com- 
pania Naviera Mexicans, S. A., a 
British corporation operating under 
the laws of Mexico, has secured the 
principal transportation concc- 
along the Lower California and 
Mexican coast. Tt is asserted that 
the British company is making ef- 
forts to freeze ..tit American craft 
from operating along the 1 
coast. 

Suspension of the master's lie 
of Captain John Alwen for two 
• by Supervising Inspector Wil- 
liam Fisher of Seattle is susl 
by Inspector General i : hler 

of the United States Steamboat In- 
spection Service at Washing 
Captain Alwen was master of the 
freighter "West llartland" when it 
rammed and sank the passenger 
steamer "Governor" April 1 at the 
entrance to Puget Sound. 

The Green Star Steamship Cor- 
poration 1 in the United 
States District Court a libel for 
$10,000 against the Matson Naviga- 
tion Company, claiming that the 
amount is due as the result of ser- 
vice rendered the liner Buckeye State 
during a lire on that vessel on June 
12. The Eastern corporation has 
libeled 633 tons of structural steel 
discharged here when the Buckeye 
State arrived recently while on her 
way to Honolulu. 

The American barkentine Kath- 
erine Mackall, owned 1>>- W. I.. 
Comyn & Co., Inc.. has been placed 
on the berth September 1, loading 
for Cape Town and Durban, South 
Africa. She will then proceed to 
Seattle and Vancouver for Novem- 
ber 1 loading. Another barkentine of 
the Comyn interests will go on berth 
within the next three months. Co- 
myn said that this action ■ 
in order t< > place the vessels in 
operation. Placing of the "Katherine 
Mackall" on berth, he said, was due 
to the fact that merchants abroad 
are not financially able to buy whole 
cargoes. 

The three-masted schooner "Plant- 
er" foundered off Key West during 
ale August IS, 1921. The craft 
was en route from Philadelphia to 
Mobile when she went down. 
captain and members of the crew 
reached Key West safely in small 
boats. Twenty-five years ago the 
"Planter." then a barkentine and 
owned by P.. E. Kentfield, plied out 
of San Francisco to Hawaii in the 
ir-carrying trade. Prior to the 
war she rested on the Oakland 
mud flats. Then during tl* hey-dey 
of high charters, Walter Scat 
purchased the "Planter" for $15,000. 
He spent $35,000 fixing her up. 
charter rates paid for the vessel 
many times over. Later I.. A. S 
of Mobile purchased her and since 
that time she has been plying be- 
tween east coast ports and Mobile 
in the coal trade until doomed by 
the gale on August 15. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 

SUITS AND 4JIm . . 

OVERCOATS Established A " WOrk d ° ne m 

to Order at Popular for 20 years our own sanitary 

Prices workshop 

Represented by £ p£GUILLAN 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE! — S. Q. Swanson is not connected 
With any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP° r OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka. Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 




Brother of Carl Wohmar Holm, 
a native of Isle of Nargem, Es- 
thonia, born 1888, last heard of at 
Newport, Monmouthshire, England, 
on an American ship in 1916. Kindly 
communicate with Erik Kristian 
Holm, care National Sailors' and 
Firemen's Union, 9 Dubois street. 
Antwerp, Belgium. 7-27-21 



MARINE ENGINEERING — NAVIGATION 

We prepare you tor examination in four to six weeks, 

dollars pays for individual instruction until you get your license. 

THE TECHNICAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

Phone Fillmore 9 70 — 2707 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Ahlstrom, Ellis 
Ahlstrom, Kilian F. 
Apinaitis. Antony 
Anderson, J. A. 
Amundsen. Ben 
Allen, I. J. 
Allen, William 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Bill 
Anderson, A. B. 
Allen. E. 
Bassin, George 
Back. Christ 
Bacbman, Peter 

w. 
Baker, Eddie 
Beats, Chas. M. 
BJ«»rseth, K. M. 
Bennett. Chas. C. 
Boria, Mike 
Breen, Thomas 
Baeh, S. C. 
Bakke, Eilif J. 
Corrigan, Reul B. 
Cooper, Oswald 
Durett, Joseph E. 
Doehring, Otto M. 
I >e Mon, Earl 
Danielson, Alben 
I (lets, A. 

Eriekson, Emanuel 
Erickson, Hans E. 
Ellis, I. W. S. 
Emmerz, Josef 
Engler, Samuel 
Elze, Carl 
Fielding, P. 
Eorsberg, Swen L. 
Framnes, A. 
Fugman, Arthur 
Foster, Clarence 

, William S. 
Golden, Roy L. 
Gilklson, A. F. 
Gray, John 

Gluek, Karl 
Gorman, Peter A. 
Gallery, Russell B. 
Glaser, Jean 
Green, Joe 
Harris. Thomas 
I lull, Robert E. 
Halvorsen, Hans 
Hopperman, II. 
Holman, Martin 
Hanson, William 
Harris, John T. 
Huber, Charles L. 

n, O. 
Howell, E. W. 
Hanson, Carl 
Holman, Martin 
Hofstad, Lester 
Henriksen, George 
Hines, Leo 
Hill. Charles 
Holmes, M. 
ll'ino, Gust. 



Inguealsen, Arthur 
Jensen, Emanuel 
Johansen. Stefan 
Jensen, Chris 

-2278 
Johnson, E. 
Johnsen, Ben 
Jensen, E. Churs 

Dan 
Koster, Walter 
Klaver, R. 
Karlsson, August 
Kopperman, H. 
Kluck. Karl 
Kaaveland, Thos. 
Kennedy, Bart 
Kelly. TX J. 
Kiepper, T. 
KotIUS, Jack 
Kraus, Jack 
Larson, Chris 
Lundgren, Gust 
Law, H. C. 
Lackey, Chas. H. 

M. 
Lambers, G. B. 
Lesklnen, John 
Lewis, H. S. 
Lent, Frank 
Langerud, Henry 
McDonald, James 
Miller, Winford 
Mack, George W 
Martin, Charles 
Mallkoff, Peter 
Meyer, Robert 
Morey, Art J. 
Mikkelsen, Harry 
Muldrose, W. I .. 
Markim, Bernard 
Mackway. George 
McGregor 
Neuman, Alex 
Neuman, John C. 
Norberg, John E. 
Norgaard, Henry 
Norman, A. 
Nelson, Peter 
Nilsen, Christ 
Olson, John 
Olsen, Michael 
Olson, Tom 
Osterlund. A. J. 
Peppert, Fred C. 
Peterson. Carl A. 
Petersen, William 
Pettersen, John 
Taterson, George 
Petersen, Knut 
Pursl, Ernest 
Paysti, Anskelm 
Preston, E. 
Pope, Bert 
Pehle, Frank L. 
Rhodes, Russel C. 
Redondo, Manuel 
Rever, John T. 
Rofenau, J. 
Robertson, E. J. 



Rengsdorf, W. 
Sibley, Milton 
Sadling, Axell 
Spatig, Harvey S. 
Sauer, O. K. 
Samuelsen, Slgvart 
Sanderson 
Skaar, Jakol 
Skubber, Hans 
Skaar, O. W. 
Swansson, N. O. 
Smith, Carl J. 
Sltts. Bud 
Sinclair, P. 
Sterner, Charles 
Slade, I. S. 
Sanders, George 
Svansson, Ernest 
Toomey, Paul 
Thompson, Guy 
Thornquist, Adolf 
Tuhkanen, John J. 
Tolman, W. E. 
Torwlck, H. 
Taylor. Bert 
Tingstrom, A. R. 
Taylor, J. G. 
\ "'its, Clayton L. 



. Fred C. 
Westley, W. E. 
Waltei, B. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Witravamen, Geo. 
Warniek, A. D. 
Walters. Fred L. 
Wohn, Otje 
Wolff, Herbert 
Wood, E. E. 
White, William 
Wi-rtanen, Frans 
Willey, Edward 
York, Chas. E. 
REGISTERED 
LETTERS 
Peterson, Carl 
Belimar, Joe 
Delgado, Nazarlo 
Worgaard, H. 
PACKAGES 
Adams, H. C. 
Heaps, James 
La Born, Roy 
Okasskl, Welling- 
ton 
Scarthland, Gunnar 
Williams. Edward 



Mrs. Margareth Watson is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
husband, John Watson, who left 
Seattle on board the S. S. "Jadden," 
and was then heard from in June, 
1920, on board the S. S. "Quaker 
City," at Philadelphia. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts, kindly 
communicate with his wife at 3420 
Thirty-ninth avenue S. W., Seattle, 
Wash. 6-22-21 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Fred Klein, who left New Orleans 
on the S. S. "Lake Ferona" in 
March, 1920, is inquired for by his 
father, L. Klein. Address, care the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion, 543 Bienville Street, New 
Orleans, La. Charles Thorescn. 
Agent. 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
in the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It Is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA x^OLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Toilette is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
I luni where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other man in public life. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year — Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine. Madison. Wis. 



SINGLE ROOMS 

$1.50, $1.7."., $2.00, $2.60 a Week 

BROOKLYN HOTEL 

369 First Street Phone Douglas 604 

SINGLE HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 

$2.75 to $3.00 Per Week 

I'lMl'.I.K HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 
$5.50 Per Week 



Anyone knowing how Eugene Mc- 
Nulty, coalpasser, met his death re- 
cently at Boat Harbor, Newport 
News, Va., while employed on S. S. 
'"Co'ciuit," will confer a favor on his 
mother, Mrs. Frances McNulty, 511 
Hemlock street, Scranton, Pa., or 
Silas B. Axtell, 9 State street, New 
York City, by communicating with 
either one. 



THE 

JAMES H. BARRY CO. 

'Uhe Star 'Press 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

\\'e print "Tin' Seamen's Journal" 



ALBERT MICHELSON, Attor- 
ney-at-law; attorney for Marine 
Firemen & Watertenders' Union; 
Admiralty law a specialty. 676 Mills 
Bldg., Telephone Douglas 1058. Resi- 
dence Phone Prospect 2908. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of William Peterson, horn in Nor- 
way, last heard of in tiayonne, N. J., 
when he quit the S. S. "Gulfland" on 
November 11, 1918; is requested to 
communicate with Joseph A. Moran, 
43 Ship street, or John Ward, 489 
Eddy street, Providence, R. I. 

4-27-21 



To Scandinavian Sailors: 

Inheritances collected. Money 
forwarded to all places in Sweden, 
Norway, and Denmark to banks 
or private persons at lowest rates. 
Full guarantee. 

LEONARD GEORGES, 

General Passenger Agent Swedish- 
American Line, 268 Market St. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



pllllllllllll!llil!l!llll!lllllil!llll!l!lll!llllllll!llllllll!l!lin 

| WeeMy Mews Letter | 

■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui 

drink and laugh and smoke together as 
they divide profits out of the ammunition 
they sold to all nations to destroy each 
other. 

"The world is in the hands of 'hard- 
faced men' who tell us they must have 
unemployment, as it is the only way to 
break down not only wages, but to break 
down the spirit of the workers. 

"We shall abolish unemployment more 
easily in peace than it was abolished in 
war, and to a much more useful purpose. 
We shall all have work and rejoice in our 
work when we calmly and legitimatel) 
take our places as equals with all men 
in the ordering of our daily tasks." 



, West Virginia Mine Issues Evaded by 
Governor 

With the skill of a corporation lawyer 
Governor Morgan dodges the attempt to 
force him to assist in ending civil war 
in West Virginia. 

At a mass meeting in Charlestown, W. 
\"a., of citizens of five counties the Gover- 
nor was asked to use his good offices to 
get the mine workers and coal owners 
together. The Governor twists this re- 
quest to make it appear that the mass 
meeting called upon him to use coercive 
methods. After he erected this straw 
man, he waxes virtuous on his limitations 
as chief executive and his absence of 
power to force a conference. He uses 
the same tactics when he would create 
the impression that the miners are at- 
tempting to force recognition of their 
union. 

In dealing with the claim of citizens 
| that the Slate mining laws are being 
violated in Mingo county, he refers them 
to the Mingo county courts, although that 
county is under martial law, proclaimed 
by the Governor, after the miners were 
forced on strike in an attempt to enforce 
these laws. 

The citizens also called on the Governor 
to insist that the State bill of rights, 
guaranteeing protection against unlawful 
search and seizure in their homes, be 
assured in Mingo county r . This is an awk- 
ward presentation for the Governor, and 
he meets it by ignoring it. 

Trade unionists declare the letter is an 
insult to the citizens of West Virginia, 
although it again shows that no aid can 
be expected from the chief executive in 
re-establishing constitutional government 
in this State. 



Warships Breed Suspicion 

London, England, Sept. 3. — "The build- 
ing of battleships will never help our 
unemployed," declared John Hill, general 
secretary of the United Society of Boiler 
Makers and Iron Shi]) Builders. 

"Every warship we build will increase 
international suspicion, reduce trade and 
cancel a score of merchant ships. 

"Today the German fleet is at the bot- 
tom and they cannot build a fleet for the 
next forty years. America is our comrade 
of the great war. Japan is our 
special ally. Yet, we are told by 
our government that we must keep our 
eye on them and start the same competi- 
tion in armaments with them as we did 
with Germany — a competition which can 
only end in one way — war. 

"This Government is controlled by big 
business. Big business is not national b\ 
any means. It is international. 

"The British shareholders will sing 'God 
Rave the King,' and hoist the Union Jack. 
The American shareholders will sing 
'Yankee Doodle' and hoist the Stars and 
Stripes. 

"Each will be the most bigoted patriot 
in his own country and curse the blasted 
foreigner. 

"At the annual dividend meeting of 
their international company they will 



U. S. Court Decision Aids Profiteers 

A statement prepared by the United 
States Treasury Department for Congress- 
man ( Hdficld shows that more than $1,- 
500,000,000 war profits have been protected 
from taxation since March last year, by 
issuing stock dividends in this amount. 

Last year the United States Supreme 
Court declared the tax on stock dividends 
is invalid, and Congressman Oldfield in- 
sisted that new legislation be prepared 
that would reach these tax dodgers. The 
1 louse ignored the request when it passed 
the new tax bill. 

He said a 20 per cent tax would net 
the Government $300,000,000 a year, and 
would reach those most able to bear it. 

"Take the Crane Company," he said, 
"which issued 200 per cent stock divi- 
dends; take the North Texas Oil Com- 
pany, which issued a 500 per cent stock- 
dividend; take the Franklin Yarn Com- 
pany, which issued a 2,000 per cent stock 
dividend. The Standard Oil Company of 
Nebraska, just a few days ago, issued a 
200 per cent dividend. 

"You do not tax them because the tax- 
would fall upon those who are most able 
to bear the burden of taxation to run the 
Government and pay the war debt. 

"The claim is made that the excess 
profits tax retards business and should 
therefore be repealed. Then, on the other 
hand, they argue that not only the excess 
profits tax is added and passed on to the 
consumer, but in many cases more than 
the tax is passed on to the consumer, 
thereby contributing to the high cost of 
living. 

"These two statements are not con- 
sistent and show how ridiculous some 
witnesses become when they are making 
any sort of argument that they think may 
be necessary to shift the burden of taxa- 
tion to the shoulders of the other fellow. 

"The price level of commodities in this 
country increased 01 per cent before any 
excess profits was even discussed in this 
country, and a further rise of 25 per cent 
additional before the law was placed on 
the statute hooks; hence it seems to me 
that these facts alone dispose of the 
argument that these taxes have been 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Soaraon's Union | 
of Amorkn 



Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 



THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

iy 2 Lewis Street 
i ..„„ Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 67 -6 9 Front Street 

BALTIMORE, Md C . RASMUSSEN, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

13 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS. Va JULIUS NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN Agent 

G0y 2 Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La CHARLES THORSEN, Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex SAM HALL, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex L . LA RSEN. Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHARLES MARTELL, Agent 

369 South Main Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga H . COOK, Agent 

27 Houston Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. j. LEWIS Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEON W. MENDEL, Agent 

707 Palafox Street 

TAMPA, Fla C. F. BIGELOW, Agent 

205 Polk Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C ERNEST H. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 



S. T. Hogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer, Seamen's 
specialty. Sixth floor, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1880.— Adv. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NW YORK CITY, N Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 
W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 
Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 
, Branches: 

NEW YORK, NY D . E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A . MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T . KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGBRS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BROOKLYN, NY s. V . ROREN, Agent 

260 President Street 

BALTIMORE, Md H . MEYERS, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK NOLAN, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

MOBILE, Ala J. W . ENGLAND, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

413% Twenty-first Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex R. M . WILSON, Agent 

332 Proctor Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga A . BOGE A t 

21 West Bay Street S 

CHARLESTON, S. C FRANK D. WHITE Agent 

123 West Bay Street ' 

PROVIDENCE, R. I r. bell> Agent 

693 Eddy Street B 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEAV YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK. N. V JAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY Agent 

138 South Second Street 

I'.ALTIMORE. Md PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

812 South Broadway 

NICWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332y 2 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON. Tex J. KOMISKIE, Agent 

2306 Post Office Street. Ave. E. 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, V;. PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAN LYONS, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. McCABE, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I HARRY RIDLEY, Agent 

296 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me McDONALD, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga GEO. McMURDO, Agent 

523 East Bay Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C R. MCLAUGHLIN, Agent 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Muss, 202 Atlantic Avenue 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary 
Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y IAMES J. FAGAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. I H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 
(Continued on Page 11) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 









Tlrae SeamaeBa's Jotariaal | 

Published Weekly at San Francisco 
by THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 
i 

J. VANCE THOMPSON Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.50 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office. Martitne Hall Bldg., 

5S Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San FrancTsco Postoffice as second- 
class matter, Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
■if postage provided for in Section 1103. Act of 
October 3. 1917. authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
iiiriicatlons from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1921. 



IX REVIEW' 



Now thai the turmoil of hostilities lias 
temporarily subsided, and the recent lockout 
of marine unions is fast becoming only an 
unpleasant memory, a brief review of cause 
and effect should be in order. 

To obtain a complete idea of the many 
forces and influences which led up to the 
climax of May 1, 1921, when the lockout 
of Vmerican seamen became effective, all 
ramifications of the maritime situation would 
require consideration. Hue to the fact thai 
the salient features have keen published in 
previous issues of the Journal, a brief 
summary is all that can be attempted at 
this time. It is necessary to note the condi 
tions which prevailed during the summer and 
fall of last year, when coming events began 
to cast their shadows before. 

All nations of the earth were feeling the 
effect of post- war conditions and were more 
or less in the throes of reconstruction. The 
United States, most favored nation, was the 
onlj industrial country maintaining its 
monetary standard, the rate of exchange 
balancing in our favor to a degree which 
mitigated against every other nation with 
more or less severity. The nations affected 
in most adverse manner were accordingly 
less able to buy from us. This resulted in 
checking even the ordinary flow of our 
foreign commerce. 

American goods were piled up in the sea- 
ports of Australia. China, Central and South 
America, Japan and various parts of Eu- 
rope. That which we had ready for ship- 
ments remained in warehouse here. There 
was no market for these goods then, and 
there is still little prospect of immediate 
relief whik- the rate of exchange maintains 
its present ratio. The apostles of greed 
knew of these conditions then, and they 
know it now. hut insatiable desire to ad- 
vantage b) unusual external circumstances 
impossible of control. It is this de- 
termination to capitalize the situation which 
has keen one of the factors in bringing 
about world-wide industrial depression. 

Equipped with advance knowledge of 
Coming depression, the commercial inter- 
carefully laid their plans to take full 



advantage of whatever opportunities might 
offer to further entrench themselves, ar- 
rogate more power, and break down any 
resistance. 

It was much more by design than nat- 
ural coincidence that attacks were insti- 
tuted against the maritime organizations 
oi the highest developed commercial na- 
tions almost simultaneously, the .Wo 
ciation of the International Shipping Fed- 
eration il.t'd) undoubtedly exerting the 
most powerful influence. 

The attack upon seamen was coincident 
to like aggressions upon the rights and 
living standards of the world's producers; 
but the seamen's organizations were as 
sailed with more bitterness ami determina- 
tion. 

There is a possibility that it was due to 
the fact that they had keen achieving 
most in the way of advancement, and 
were at a point where the last vestige 
of legalized slavery was to he swept 
away. 

Under tin' maritime laws of every na- 
tion outside of the United States, seamen 
are still bondsmen. Their legal status 
throughout the world -excepting within 
United States jurisdiction — is still that of 
the Dark Ayes. Seamen have not yet at- 
tained the status of free men, therefore 
they constitute the only element of society 
still subject to involuntary servitude, and 
the last nucleus upon which the tyrant 
could hope to rcinstitute the system. 

Even this small nucleus was falling he- 
lore the onward march of civilization. The 
enactment of the Ea Toilette Act made 
freemen of American seamen everywhere 
and seamen of other nations become free 
when within United States jurisdiction. 

This new idea was on the point of being 
followed to a conclusion throughout the 
world, and the threatened obliteration of 
involutary servitude undoubtedly acted as 
a spur to the antagonism of commercial 
interests. Therefore it could he deemed 
not only necessary to check the progress 
towards greater liberty; but "big business" 
decided to turn hack the hands of time. 

In order to accomplish this purpose, it 
was necessary to bring the seamen to a 
state of helplessness, which would he im 
possible so long as the marine unions 
could function: therefore annihilation of 
seamen's organizations above all others is 
the one thing necessary to fulfil the com- 
bined employers' scheme of things. 

We have withstood the attack in all it^ 
force and face the future confident and 
unafraid. 

It would he the height of folly to at- 
tempt to deceive ourselves. Considerable 
fur has keen torn from our hides hut 
there is consolation in looking at the 
other fellow too. Our regular order has 
keen somewhat disjointed. All our weak- 
points have keen exposed — which can be 
diverted to our henefit instead of injury. 
We are subject to conditions and in- 
dignities which must he remedial at first 
Opportunity, and we are confronted with 
a task which requires all the courage, 
fortitude and determination which is tie- 
mental with all seamen worthy of the 
name. 

Our solidarity has been enhanced by 
the ordeal, hut we must set our teeth to 
the task as the boatman lavs to his oars 
in a storm. We have weathered the brunt 



of the storm, now to the goal where 
ruthless greed will never again dare at- 
tempt aggression. 

\\ e have learned many lessons, and can- 
not permit them to go unheeded. One 
of the most important requirements is the 
individual interest and effort of ever. 
member in the organization. If mem- 
bers attend the meetings regularly; hring 
forward constructive plans; tend strictly 
to the work in hand and keep up live 
interest, we shall speedily remove the 
scars of the recent struggle and advance 
he ond even our most optimistic vision. 



I ONGRATULATIONS PREMATURE 



If open-shoppers are gleaning any com- 
fort from the apparent unrest within the 
ranks of organized labor, they are prema- 
ture in their glee, and due to receive an 
unpleasant jolt in the near future. 

The keen interest now being displayed 
in the workings of unions, by the rank 
and file, is more a sign of vigorous health 
than otherwise. 

Under the old system of agreements — 
usually negotiated by standpat officials- - 
the employers had a copper riveted cinch, 
and they spoiled a pretty little working 
plan for themselves when they sought to 
decimate the A. F. of E. 

'fhe good old days, when unions could 
he inveigled into agreements which com- 
mitted them to break strikes of fellow 
unionists by remaining at work, and giv- 
ing aid and comfort to strikebreakers, art- 
fast receding into history. 

The open-shop campaign has keen an 
education for the workers which will re- 
sult in more pork chops for them and less 
profits for the boss. Where rank and file 
activities have resulted in temporary detri- 
ment to the unions it has keen caused by 
the determination of Stand-pat officials to 
perpetuate their own ideas, no matter how 
obsolete, and a like determination on their 
part to rule or ruin. 

Once the membership takes control from 
such reactionary grasp, these unions too 
will show a rapid and healthy recently, 
and the opportunity to rule or ruin will 
be lost to the leaders forever. The new- 
idea among the workers is for greater 
solidarity, the accomplishment of which 
will lead to the workers taking consider- 
able part in the control of, as well as fur- 
nishing motive power for industry. 



MORAL: WHY HE A PET? 



There is a generally accepted theory 
that certain attributes of animals are fre- 
quently found reflected in man. 

In the primary schools of England the 
young mind is often regaled with allegory 
as a means of conveying a moral or an 
idea. < hie of the most impressive of these 
analogies is that which concerns the char- 
acteristics of the wolf and the dog. 

An illustration is given to the effect 
that, once upon a time, a mangy and starv- 
ing wolf was driven by the pangs of 
hunger to forsake his usual haunts, and 
found himself upon the vast estate of a 
Russian nobleman, when he met a splendid 
specimen of the mastiff breed, well fed and 
well groomed, In dog language, the wolf 
was roundly scored for his intrusion and 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



unkempt appearance; but being somewhat 
kinder of heart than the average "plute," 
the dog offered the starving wolf a few 
scraps of food, which was gratefully ac- 
cepted and they trotted off towards the 
kennel. 

As they went along exchanging con- 
fidences, the wolf could hardly conceal 
his envy for the well fed sleekness of his 
brother (the do«), who, with conscious 
pride, kept up continual praise of his mas- 
ter. The mastiff told of how he kept con- 
stant watch over his master's interests and 
jealously guarded his property, devoting 
all his life to such service, so that he had 
not time of his own to spare with the 
companionship of other dogs. The wolf 
was urged to seek the same service and 
enjoy such rewards as the master would 
bestow. 

As they neared the buildings, the wolf 
became more and more shy and uneasy, 
and chancing to observe the fur chafed 
around the dog's neck incpiired as to the 
cause; whereupon the mastiff exclaimed: 
"That is where my collar chafes when my 
master ties me up." That seems to be 
about all the wolf cared to know, for the 
story tells of how he scampered off to 
frozen hills and forests, preferring their 
freedom and hunger to slavish servitude 
with is promise of a full stomach. 

The moral is obvious, even to the young 
idea, and frequently the child carries its 
influence through life. Those who are 
satisfied to submit their talents to the 
whim of the capitalist class for the bone 
that will be thrown their way choose the 
career of the mastiff. If they lean towards 
writing, their effusions must coincide with 
such ideas as are acceptable in the sight of 
the master class. Tf judicial, their rulings 
conform to capitalist desires. When they 
enter other activities, their preachments 
often tend to instil meekness, patience and 
long suffering in the breasts of the toilers, 
even under the most ruthless oppression of 
insatiable exploiters. In order to enjoy 
the well-groomed coat and sleek body they 
must wear the master's collar. 

Those who see virtue in the wolf must 
of necessity forego all hope of success in 
life as Ave know it. If they are determined 
to maintain independence of thought and 
action, or seek to walk only along the path 
of life as they themselves see it; or decide 
never to sacrifice ideals for a mess of pot- 
tage. Those who insist on preaching the 
Gospel of Truth must suffer the conse- 
quence of failure and privation. Many be- 
come seamen, migratory workers, drifters, i 
adventurers and nomads. 

But they are free from the chafing col- 
lar, master of their own destinies, control- 
ling their own thoughts, not compelled to 
work injury to their fellows. They must 
live and die rebels, free and untamable. 
Like the noble race of Redmen — who ac- 
cepted extermination rather than slavery — 
these men are unafraid. They who refuse 
to worship at the shrine of Mammon can 
face their God without fear and glory in 
the spirit that breathes of freedom. 

The number of pampered menials in the 
ranks of seamen is nominal, for which 
we can be duly thankful. Seamen, gen- 
erally, are not imbued with the faithful 
dog attributes, therefore not subject to 
licking the hand that works their injury. 
Our motto stands: "Tomorrow is also a 
day.'' 



ENGINEERS ARE O. K. 



There are a great number of sailors 
who will never forget the splendid fight 
put up by the Marine Engineers' Bene- 
ficial Association of San Francisco. Before 
their qualities had been put to the test, 
those who did not know them were in- 
clined to be pessimistic. 

There is no doubting Thomas now. 
Considering the nature of their position, 
and what they had at stake, also the ex- 
ternal circumstances attending the con- 
troversy and the manner in which they 
met the issue, the Marine Engineers' 
Beneficial Association have acquitted 
themselves with honor. It is this knowl- 
edge which fills us with confidence that 
machinations of the shipowners to disrupt 
by dual organization or any other method 
is doomed to result in failure. 

Comrades in the movement for a higher 
civilization, we wish the Marine Engineers' 
Beneficial Association the speedy success 
their manly qualities deserve. 



(JETTING BUSY 



The following press item is interesting 
in light of recent events, growing out of 
the wreck of the "Alaska." 

Although furnished a few days ago with 
the entire force of eight men from the Coast 
< iuard cutter "Golden Gate" to assist him. 
Captain August Anderson is busier than 
ever at his task of examining seamen for 
their fitness to handle lifeboats. 

The rush began about two weeks ago, 
when the Federal authorities notified ship 
owners that they must comply with the regu- 
lations requiring their seamen to have life- 
boat certificates. It was found that most 
of the seamen had either lost their certifi- 
cates, or had taken the examinations. 

Long lines of men wait every day at the 
office at Meiggs Wharf to take the exami- 
nation. Within the last week alone over 
five hundred men have been examined, it 
was stated yesterday by Commander James 
H. Brown, head of the Coast Guard service. 

Those desiring certificates are quizzed by 
Captain Anderson, and then taken out to 
the lagoon behind the barge office to demon- 
strate their ability to handle a pair of oars. 
They are not actually required to lower a 
lifeboat. 

It is worthy of note that the foregoing 
case, of locking the door after the horse 
has been stolen, applies in double manner. 
The lockout has ended, therefore, continued 
laxity in enforcing marine laws would be 
an unnecessary evil. 



OPPOSE COOLIE PLAN 



Porto Rican organized wage earners 
have forwarded to the house immigration 
committee at Washington their protest 
against the admission of Chinese coolies 
to Hawaii. The unionists show that 
coolies in Hawaii will be detrimental to 
the life and well-being of hundreds of 
families of Porto Rican workers who have 
been taken from this island under govern- 
mental agreement to work on Hawaiian 
sugar plantations. 

The unionists point out that Porto Rican 
sugar cannot compete with Hawaiian 
suLrar, produced under the peonage svstem 
and that the Hawaiian sugar dumped into 
the United States will make Porto Rican 
competition impossible, thereby •'menacing 



FFICIAL 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 6, 1921 
A synopsis of the minutes of the ahove date 
will he published in the next issue. 

R. INGWARDSEN, 
Secretary pro tem. 
Maritime Hall Bldg.. 59 Clav Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, August 29, 1921. 

Shipping and prospects dull. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, August 29, 1921. 
Shipping fair. 

A. KLEMMSEN, Agent. 
2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, August 29, 1921. 
Shipping fair. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, August 29, 1921. 
Shipping in steam schooners fair. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agenv. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, August 29, 1921. 
Shipping dull. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
S8'/ 2 Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, August 29, 1921. 
Shipping good. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P.O.Box 67. 
Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, August 22, 1921. 
Shipping picking up. 

WILLIAM HARDY, Agent. 
P O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 

the great bulk of agricultural workers of 
Porto Rico and driving them to suffer 
more hardships and misery. 

"The sugar industry of Porto Rico can- 
not be successfully operated in the face 
of such destructive competition and wdl 
be ruined and those dependent thereon will 
be unable to enjoy a living wage unless 
the fundamental policy of Chinese coolie 
exclusion from the possessions and terri- 
tories of the United States is strictly 
observed. 



In seeking to destroy our organizations 
many of the shipowners make their great- 
est miscalculation in the belief that the 
unionism of seamen is mainly represented 
by the possession of a union book or card. 
If such were true our hopes and aspirations 
would be vain indeed. 

There never was a body of workers any- 
where in whom the desire for solidarity 
was more ingrained or who hold to their 
ideals with more fervor than the seamen 
of the Pacific Coast. They have made 
unionism a special pride and are jealous 
of their record. Looking further ahead, 
they are now determined to harmonize 
more thoroughly with their co-workers in 
the transport industry. 

Men of such spirit and principle are un- 
beatable. The employers would save them- 
selves anxiety and cash if they could be 
brought to an understanding of this fact; 
the sooner the better for all concerned. 



The attention of seamen and fishermen 
is respectfully directed to our advertisers. 
It has always paid to advertise in the 
Journal, and in spite of the fact that the 
purchasing power of seamen was recently 
somewhat restricted we are at all times in 
a position to patronize those wdio seek our 
trade and good will. While looking for 
the union label, remember our advertisers. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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ws fra>mm ttlhi© AttlsMMSc Coasft 



JUSTICE DENIED TO WORKERS 



By EUGENE LYONS 
Boycott of American ships and Ameri- 
can goods in Italian harbors is one of the 
projects under serious consideration 
throughout Italy as a protest against the 
conviction of Nicola Sacco and I'artolomeo 
Vanzetti, the labor organizers recently 
tried on a murder charge in Dedham. 
Mass., according to a special radio mess- 
age to the New York Call. The idea is said 
to emanate from leading members of the 
Federation of Marine Workers, one of the 
leading labor bodies in Italy. It is re- 
ported thai some sailors, infuriated by the 
verdict against their compatriots on insuf- 
ficient evidence, have taken steps, inde- 
pendently of their organization, to inter- 
fere with American shipping. 

Detailed account- of the trial and its 
outcome, printed in the greatest daily 
newspaper in the country, "Avanti," roused 
all the labor elements and in a measure 
also the rest of the country. The labor 
press, which is so powerful in that coun- 
try, calls the cast' an outrage and talks 
continually of reprisals. Tt evokes the 
memorj of the case of Ettor and Giovan- 
nitti, almost sent to the chair by the 
money interests in punishment for their 
activity in the Lawrence strike, in the 
same State, which now may electrocute 
Sacco and Vanzetti. 

Among those who are taking the lead 
in Italv in demanding fair play for Sacco 
and Vanzetti is the Socialist grOUp in the 
Chamber of Deputies, comprising 130 
deputies. The Department of Foreign Af- 
fairs is holding off action until it will re- 
ceive a complete report on the trial, as 
prepared by Marquis Ferranti, Italian Con- 
sul in Boston. 

Tn America, too, the protest against the 
verdict is gathering strength. The De- 
Committee is in receipt of numer- 
ous letters and resolutions from labor 
unions all over the country, expressing 
their unqualified belief in the innocence 
of the two Italians and pledging their sup- 
port of the fight in behalf of a new trial 
or a reversal of the verdict. A resolution 
hv Local .US, International Association of 
Machinists, in Salem. Mass.. L especially 
significant, because tin- local is so near 
the scene of the trial and therefore thor- 
oughly conversant with the facts. After 
asserting faith in the innocence of the two 
men. the resolution demands "that broth- 
ers Sacco and Vanzetti he granted a new- 
trial in another county, where personal 
prejudices will he swept aside and the 
scales of justice permitted at least to bal- 
ance evenly." 

Indicative of the way the conscientious 
men and women in the community here, 
even among the conservatives, an 1 affected 
by the verdict is the fact that John Law- 
rence Hurley, professor in the Suffolk Law 
Scho.,1 and a prominent Republican leader, 
came out publicly for a new trial. After 
going through tin- record of the proceed- 
ings which resulted in the conviction, he 
was convinced, he says, that a terrible 
miscarriage of justice had been made, and 
volunteered to speak. in behalf of the Ital- 



^ : io;::.;,!;:,.!!;!;!!.', !:!:iM[:!!!::i!:ij.,,:,.,.!if]ti!:i!i[iiiifriiNiir!irififM!it!iMfiiinis!M;![iiLiFn:[iifJ:;i!!MN[iin;!i!::!i 
ians at a meeting arranged for the pur- 
pose in Union Hall. 

A conservative paper, the Boston Amer- 
ican, also condemned the verdict. The 
editorial says in part : "The evidence, as 
it appears from the stenographers' notes, 
is most unconvincing to us. and we are in- 
formed that nearly all the newspaper re- 
porters from the Boston papers, who cov- 
ered this trial, agree that the verdict of 
guilty was not justified." 

Condemnation of the process >>i sending 
men to tin- electric chair on circumstantial 
evidence was voiced by J. A. Hopkins, 
national chairman of the Committee of 
Forty-eight, who points out in a public 
letter that the injustice of circumstantial 
evidence has been demonstrated t im ■ 
again. He uses the Sacco- Vanzetti case 
as an example of conviction on such evi- 
dence. "The evidence against them," he 
says, "is entirely of a circumstantial na- 
ture and in man}- respects of the flimsiest 
character." 

Meanwhile tin- enemies of labor in 
Massachusetts are doing their best to dis- 
credit the defense of the two men. Friends 
of Sacco and Vanzetti were blamed in the 
newspapers here "by a high State official" 
for starting a run on the Boston hive 
Gents Savings Hank, the theory being that 
tin' rush was inspired for revenge. This 
has. of course, been shown to he false and 
preposterous. 



THE TEST OF A MAN 

The test of a man is the fight he makes, 

The grit that he daily shows; 
The way he stands on his feet and takes 

Fate's numerous humps and blows. 
A coward can smile when there's naught 
to fear, 

When nothing his progress bars, 
But it takes a man to stand up and cheer 

While some other fellow stars. 
It isn't the victory after all. 

But the fight that a brother makes: 
The man who, driven against the wall. 

Still stands up erect and takes 
The blows of fate with his head held high. 

Bleeding and bruised and pale, 
Is the man who'll win in the by and by, 

For lie isn't afraid to fail. 
It's the bumps you get, and the jolts 
you get, 

Ami the shocks that your courage stands, 
The hours of sorrow and vain regrel 

The prize that escapes your hands. 
That test your mettle and prove your 
worth ; 

It isn't the blows you deal. 
But the Mows you take, on tin- good old 
earth. 

That shows if your stuff is real. 

— J. McKenzie, in Granite Cutters Journal. 



INDUSTRIAL READJUSTMENT? 

A recent issue of a San Francisco daily 
informs us that Congress has adjourned 
after successfully leading industries hack- 
to normalcy: hut we know different! 
There was also another statement from 
Washington to the effect that there are 
approximately 6.000.000 unemployed in the 
country with every prospect of twice that 



number during the coming winter, which 
we know to he closer to the truth. 
Whether Congress adjourned or not makes 
little difference as far as it affects indus- 
try, because it has little influence on the 
questii >n. 

Capitalism has spoken, and its ruling is 
that production in the United States shall 
he under the "American Plan" only. In 
their arrogance the plutes attempt to deny 
workers their constitutional right to col- 
lective bargaining. Considering the fact, 
however, that industrial enterprise, em- 
ploying skilled labor under lair conditions, 
always shows a higher efficiency than 
those working under the open shop, one 
begins to ask what causes the antagonism 
towards the unions. Would capital furnish 
sufficient employment if labor was willing 
to work under the American Plan? We 
believe not; we also realize that the eco- 
nomic power of labor, when organized, 
permit- insistence on fights which auto- 
cracy naturally resents. 

During prosperous periods it pays to 
give ear to labor's requests, hut when de- 
pression arrives the employers rise in their 
lull power and endeavor to break down 
living standards of the workers. The em- 
ployers believe that their time is here 
now. It does not pay to produce com- 
modities at present time in competition 
with Japan, Germany and Great Britain; 
in fact, profits are not big enough, and the 
industrial captains do not wish to he an- 
noyed with the problem from a standpoint 
of national welfare. We are suffering 
seriously from the artificial stimulus to 
production during the war period when 
goods were produced cm big scale at war- 
time prices impossible of payment by 
foreign importers. Tn addition these foreign 
consumers recovered from the war quicker 
than expected. They are at present not 
only producing their own necessities, hut 
are overproducing, and placing the surplus 
on the world's market. We have large 
supplies of commodities on hand which 
cost so much to produce that heavy losses 
must he accepted if sold. 

The employers believe that future pro- 
duction must he cheap enough to compete 
with foreign prices, which explains in part 
the reason for their aggressions upon the 
unions. 

They desire to crush the workers be- 
yond any power of resistance. They want 
production of the future accomplished by 
longer working hours, and lower wages; 
under 100 per cent efficiency, hased upon 
standards set hy the highest skilled 
workers at the limit of human endurance. 
With these conditions operating, un- 
scrupulous employers believe they will 
garner enough profits to make production 
worth while. They may have the wrong 
. and know it, hut being profit mad 
will exercise every effort to destroy or- 
ganized labor. 

Capitalism has determined on further 
submersion of the working masses. Any- 
thing checking that desire they will ruth- 
lessl) assail. Therefore they set out to 
destroy organized labor. Fr. Harms. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



BRITISH JUSTICE IN CANADA 



The following item, from the Vancouver 
agent of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
gives some slight idea as to the quality 
of justice received by British seamen who 
have the temerity to quit their vessels L'l 
any Canadian port. 

It is easy to note that little considera- 
tion is given to the seamen's side of the 
question when these matters reach the 
courts. 

John Mayes, a deck boy on the S. S. 
"Canadian Observer," of the C. G. M. M., 
was sentenced by Justices of the Peace 
A. J. B. Mellish and J. W. Prescott to 
six weeks in the penitentiary with hard 
labor for desertion of the ship at Van- 
couver on August 8. Seven other mem- 
bers of the crew of the same ship are held 
under similar charges and are to receive 
separate trials. 

The "Observer" sailed for Halifax where 
the crew was signed on, and came to 
Vancouver via the Panama Canal. After 
going on to Ocean Falls she went south 
to San Pedro on the California coast, 
subsequently returning to Vancouver. On 
arrival eight members of the crew refused 
to stay with the ship any longer. They 
were accordingly logged, and ordered to 
be put under .arrest by Captain Cooper, 
master of the vessel. In the case of John 
Hayes the log showed that he demanded 
"coastal wage," and being refused this 
wage, which would have been an increase 
on the scale he was being paid under his 
agreement, he declined "to take the ship 
out." 

Said Food Was Dirty 

All (he witnesses gave evidence to the 
effect that the food was bad, and the fore- 
castle, where the men ate their meals and 
slept, was dirty and verminous. 

Hayes, on the stand, said that the meat 
was unfit for human consumption. The 
meat and vegetables were all put together 
into one dish like "pig's slop." The cook 
was not clean in the way he handled the 
food with his hands. They didn't get milk 
in their coffee, and for ten davs before 
coming to Vancouver they had only 
brown sugar instead of white. The}- were 
given a kind of powder in place of milk. 
They complained to the steward about 
the quality of the food and the service, 
but he took no notice of it. A deputation 
from the men also made complaint to the 
chief officer. 

The forecastle was filthy and the bed- 
ding full of vermin. Witness said he 
chucked his bed overboard and slept on 
some straw that had been used in packing 
eggs. He was given one clean blanket 
during the thirty- live days he was aboard. 
The forecastle was messy, and had from an 
inch to half an inch of water on the floor 
while the lavatory near the door was 
broken, the men having to carry water 
from midship to Hush it out. They com- 
plained to the chief mate about this condi- 
tion of the lavatory. Witness said he went 
to the skipper on August 7 and refused 
to take the ship out because of the condi- 
tion and quality of the food and the filth 
and condition of the ship. 

Corroborative Evidence 
Detective James Ellice of the Vancouver 
police force, who took custody of the 



eight men on board the ship, said he in- 
spected the forecastle of the ship and 
found it in a filthy condition and badly 
ventilated. The condition of the toilet 
was bad and the cots were dirty. He was 
shown some meat and rice all mixed up in 
a dish or black pot, and it was anything 
but appetizing. 

Captain Hann of the police patrol boat 
testified that he had five years' experience 
as a sailor, and the forecastle of the 
"Observer" was the dirtiest of any ship 
he had ever been in. 

John McClay, an A. B., Fireman Collins 
and Fireman Fitsimmons, three of the men 
charged with desertion, were also heard 
as witnesses for the accused Hayes, and 
all testified to the putrid condition of the 
food. Fireman Collins declaring that the 
meat was "disguised so we could not 
smell it." They were also agreed on the 
filthy condition of the forecastle. 

Moved Men to Laughter 

Captain Cooper said that on one occa- 
sion the firemen came to him and com- 
plained about not having milk in their tea. 
The captain spoke to the steward about 
it and was told that the men got milk- 
three times a day, and he could not afford 
to give milk oftener. On another occasion 
two of the firemen brought him a hash 
which, he said, he tasted and thought 
"extremely good hash." 

At this remark there was an outburst 
of laughter from a crowd of seafaring 
men and the members of the accused who 
were sitting in court. 

Asked by counsel for defense where the 
water came from that was on the fore- 
castle floor, the captain said it was from 
the ballast tanks below, and when a foot 
of water had been pumped from the tanks 
the water ceased to get in. 

Counsel for defense argued that in terms 
of the articles the voyage ended at Van- 
couver and that the men were entitled to 
be paid off, and that the poor quality of 
the food and dirty condition of the ship 
was justification for the men refusing to 
proceed to sea again. 

Counsel for the prosecution argued that 
in the terms of their agreement the men 
were signed on for a period not exceeding 
twelve months, that the different stages 
of the voyage constituted only one voyage, 
that the men had made no complaint about 
the food when they refused to take the 
ship out, accused having simply asked for 
coastal wages, and that accordingly they 
had deserted the ship. 

Accused Found Guilty 

The Court held that all accused had 
asked for of the captain was higher wages, 
and that he had made no complaint about 
the food or the accommodation and ac- 
cordingly found him guilty. At the same 
time expressing the opinion that certain 
interlineations in the articles, such as were 
objected to by counsel for defense, were 
not altogether desirable. 

Mr. Price, attorney for the accused, ex- 
plained that there was a fight on between 
the coast seamen and the shipping com 
panv on the interpretation of the articles, 
and that the whole matter was to be 
[ought out before the Admiralty Court at 
the end of the present month. In view 
oi that fact he asked the Court to defi I 
sentence till the whole question had been 



settled by the Admiralty Court, and to 
allow the men out on their own recog- 
nizances. There was nothing criminal, 
he claimed, in the intention of the accused, 
and it was a shame to put him in Oakalla. 

The Court declined and imposed a sen- 
tence of six weeks to date from the day 
when accused was arrested, August 8. 

Judicial prejudice has been revealed to 
a marked degree in all such cases which 
have recently come before the bar of 
justice in British Columbia, and notwith- 
standing the fact that the issue was to 
be decided in Admiralty Court in a 
similar ease, even temporary leniency was 
refused. Instead of interesting themselves 
in maintaining British supremacy on the 
seas, it would be well for British seamen 
to exert every effort to obtain their rights 
as free men, in order to receive an even 
break under the law. 



GERMAN SHIPPING GROWS 



Latest data obtainable shows that Ger- 
many does not intend to relinquish her 
merchant shipping position without a 
struggle. Vigorous efforts by German 
shipping concerns to regain, at least in 
part, their former dominant position on 
the world's seas are shown by a table, 
giving the number of vessels launched this 
year in German shipyards. 

From January 1 until the beginning of 
August, fifty-four boats, totaling approxi- 
mately 290,000 tons, were built in Ger- 
many. This indicates there was one 
launched every fourth day, but the actual 
number may be even higher, as the yards 
give out figures most unwillingly. 

The average size of these boats is 
around six thousand tons, but four of the 
largest, which are owned by the Hugo 
Stinnes Company reach 12,000 tons. The 
Hamburg-American, alone, according to 
the table, ordered one-fifth of the total 
number. Three vessels were built for 
foreign countries — Denmark, Holland and 
the free State of Danzig. 

German ship building circles, since the 
war, lay more stress on economic boats 
than on impressive ones, whereas former- 
ly they put pride in turning out huge 
vessels equipped with all luxuries. Now 
it is bent upon acquiring a fleet of small 
but highly modern economic boats that 
are less expensive in construction and 
operation. Hand in hand with the building 
of new boats goes the hiring and pur- 
chasing of vessels from other countries, 
mainly Denmark. 

Germany is doing everything in her 
power to regain the number of boats she 
was compelled to surrender to the allies 
on account of the peace treat}-. 



PANAMA CANAL TRAFFIC 



During the seven years of commercial 
operation of the Panama Canal, ending 
August 14, 13,416 commercial vessels made 
the transit through the Isthmus, accord- 
ing to the Panama Canal record. The 
traffic was made up of 6388 vessels, carry- 
ing 22,215,402 tons of cargo, from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, and 7028 vessels, 
of 23,936,617 net tons, carrying 29,363,528 
tons of cargo, from the Pacific to the At- 
lantic. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WASHINGTON LETTER 

i By Laurence Todd ' 



Alarmed by protests over the Adminis- 
tration's failure to take steps to cope with 
the growing unemployment, I 'resilient 
Harding has announced his intention to 
call an industrial conference late in Sep- 
tember to consider the problem. Secre- 
tary Hoover, the millionaire head of the 
Commerce department, seems to have full 
charge of arrangements, and announces 
that the conference will lie limited to 
twelve or fifteen delegates "made up so 
as to represent the country geographically, 
and. so far a- possible embrace representa- 
tives of the greater employment indus- 
tries." 

Well informed liberals here are inclined 
to view the industrial conference with 
considerable suspicion. They point on' 
that Secretary of Labor Davis reported 
tu Congress more than three weeks ago 
that 5,735,000 workers were unemployed. 
Several Congressmen emphasized the se- 
siousness of the situation, but the Ad- 
ministration did not lift its hand to bring 
about tin ge of constructive relic; 

measures, and instead did everything in 
its power to hurry Congress into its 
ce>s. The time to act was when Congress 
was in session. 

Since then, however, Congressmen have 
gone hack home and found unemployment 
is growing. They also have found opposi- 
tion to the S5<"),000,000 loan to the rail- 
roads and to the proposal to repeal the 
excess profits tax and higher income sur- 
taxes. The White House has been in- 
Formed of these facts and the hasty 
a nnounc ements of the industrial confer- 
ence is the result. 

It is believed here by liberals who are 
elose to the inside that the conference 
will be carefully handpicked and probably 
trst step will he to recommend prompt 
passage of the half billion dollar.-, loan to 
the railroads and restoration of Harding's 
scheme to make the repeal of the excess 
profits tax retroactive to January 1. 1921. 
The conference will go through the mo- 
tions of studying the situation and then 
recommend these measures on the ground 
they are "necessary to start the wheels 
of industry going and to bring hack pros- 
perity." This will give Congress an ex- 
cuse for passing these measures on the 
plea of emergency. Naturally, the Hard- 
ing administration would like to see as 
many men possible hack on payrolls, for 
the depression is causing political dis- 
content, hut at the same time its chief 
concern is over the vested interests and 
it will not recommend any of the funda- 
mental measures required really to remedy 
the situation. It is fairly safe to predict 
that the conference will he used to camou- 
flage some policy which the special in- 
terest- want put over and right now they 
have their hearts set on the half billion 
dollar railroad loan. 

Bethlehem Award Held Up 
The Administration has just given an- 
other evidence of its keen solicitude for 
the workers by turning down on extremely 
technical grounds payment of $1,5< 
(]\n- t.i 38-.OO0 employes of the Bethlehem 
Steel Company since June, 1918, which 
was awarded to them by the War Labor 
rd. Assistant Secretary of War Wain- 



right took advantage of a legal subterfuge 
to reverse the ruling of former Secretary 
of War Baker, although he admitted the 
a "moral right" to the money. 
The claim an.se out of an award bv the 
War Labor Board when Chief Justice 
Taft was its chairman. The award was 
ordered paid by Secretary Baker. Some- 
one on the legal division of the War 
Department sabotaged payment on one 
pretext after another until the Republican 
administration came in. Then came the 
bold reversal of the order. 

\.S a. restdt of the original award, the 
Bethlehem Steel Company put in claims 

3t the Government for incr< 
charges on contracts due to the extra 
wages— which were never paid. The 
claims by the Bethlehem Steel Company 
have been paid by the War Department, 
but the claims of the workers are denied 

Thousands of the claimants are out of 
work and many of them have contracted 
butcher and grocery hills on the strength 
of this award which the Government had 
promised to pay them. Representatives 
of the International Association of Ma- 
chinists have appealed to Secretary Weeks 
for a rehearing of the case. and. if this is 
denied, they intend to ask the President to 
Congress to validate the claims by 
special legislation. 

Coolie Lobby Opens Here 

Sugar and coffee barons of Hawaii, who 
want to import Chinese coolies to replace 
Japanese workers who are forming unions 
and demanding living wages, have estab- 
lished a permanent lobby in Washington 
under direction of C. J. McCarthy, who 
Governor of the Islands under Wil- 
son. 

McCarthy's first statement to the press 
pointed out that Hawaiians had paid $20,- 
000,000 to the Government last year in 
excess profits taxes and they could not 
continue this unless they were allowed, 
to import cheap Chinese labor. Mr. .Mc- 
Carthy conveniently overlooked the fact 
that the Harding administration has just 
repealed the excess profits tax, so that the 
profiteers of Hawaii will not have to share 
their swag with the Government. 

McCarthy admits being the official rep- 
resentative of the Honolulu Chamber o) 
Commerce. This organization is affiliated 
with the United States Chamber of Com- 
merce. Samuel Gompers declares that the 
entrance of Chinese coolies into Hawaii 
is sought by the big interests as the 
opening wedge for their importation into 
the United States proper. The American 

Federation of Labor is opposed to the 
"Hawaiian plan" for dealing with labor 
unions and the matter probably will come 
tu a showdown when Congress reassem- 
bles in ( htobcr. 

Strike Ballots Sent Out 

As a result of recent wage reductions 
ordered by the War Labor Board, execu- 
tives of the "Big four" Brotherhoods an 1 
the Switchmen's Union of America have 
sent out strike referendums to the 409,000 
mend 

The wording of three of these strike 
ballots haves the final decision to the 
discretion of the brotherhood officials. bu1 
the Trainmen's ballot puts the matter 
irely up to the men and hinds their 
executives to abide by the "majority ver- 
dict. 



Several brotherh ii ials have given 

out statements urging the men to prepare 
for a protracted strike, and the vote of 
'.he Railroad Employes Department of the 
American Federation, taken some time ago, 
is in favor of rejecting the wage awards. 
Despite these fact-. W. lett l.auett. con- 
sulting economist of the Railway Brother- 
hoods, and others closelj in touch with 
the situation, do not believe a strike will 
he called. 
A. F. of L. Orders Membership Drive 
The executive council of the American 

Federation of Labor, which has been in 
>'i more than a week at Atlantic 
City, ha- issued a call to all unions to 
join in an aggressive campaign for new 
members. The call follows an admission 
by President Gompers that the A. I 

I., has lost 75,000 dues-paying members 

since the business depression and the 
of the open shop campaign. 

There wa.s some criticism of President 
Gompers among the executive council for 
his frank admission of the facts, hut the 
majority held candor as the best policy 
and pointed out that similar losses in 
membership resulted from the depressions 
of 1893, 1907 and 1914. After each of 
depressions, the federation came 
back and more than made up its losses. 
Members of the executive council feel it 
can do so again and their call for a vigor- 
ous membership drive is their answer to 
the open shoppers. 

The executive council also issued an 
appeal to the "citizen- of America" for 
the defeat of the Nelson hill, just passed 
by the Senate. It described this hill as 
"the most subtle and pernicious attack yet 
made in the history of our land upon the 
constitutional safeguards of the rights and 
liberties of the people." 

The Nelson bill gives any Federal judge 
the right to issue a warrant for the arrest 
of a person who may live in a distant 
State and to transport him to the place 
of indictment where he may he tried 
without the opportunity of having a hear- 
ing before being removed from his home 
district. 

The appeal of the executive council 
brands this a- "a substitute for legalized 
kidnaping" and declares it "endangers the 
-al'etv of the people." 



THE NEW WORLD 



'fhe world that we must seek is a world 
in which the creative spirit is alive, in 
which life is an adventure full of joy and 
hope, based rather upon the impulse to 
construct than upon the desire to retain 
what we possess or to seize what is pos- 
1 by others. It must be a world in 
which affection has free play, in which 
love is purged of the instinct of domina- 
tion, in which cruelty and envy have been 
dispelled by happiness and the unfetered 
development of all the instincts that build 
up life and fill it with mental delights. 
Such a world is possible; it waits only 
for men to wish to create it. 

Meantime, the world in which we exist 
has other aims. Bui it will pass away. 
burned up in the fire of its own hot 
passions: and from the ashes will spring 
a new and younger world, full of fresh 
hopes, with tlie light of morning in its 
B< rtrand Rus 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 5) 



passed on to the consumer and have been 
responsible for the high cost of living 
in this country. 

"If these corporations could pass these 
taxes on to the consumer at this time, 
they would not be here asking for the 
repeal of this law. 

"The profits of all the corporations of 
this country had never exceeded $4,000,000,- 
000 before 1913. For the year 1917 these 
profits reached the astounding figure of 
$10,500,000,000. For the four years 1916- 
1919, inclusive, profits averaged $9,000,- 
000,000 before taxes were paid and $7,000,- 
000,000 after all Federal taxes had been 
paid. In other words, these corporations 
made over $30,000,000,000 during the four 
years 1916-1919, and they also made 
around $7,000,000,000 in 1920. Yet they 
come before the Congress of the United 
States and ask the Congress to relieve 
them of taxation and, of course, they ad- 
vocate the sales or consumption taxes." 



LABOR ALSO DEMANDS 
CENTIVE" 



TN- 



The House has repealed the excess 
profits tax, and war profiteers escape with 
their loot if the Senate accepts the plan. 

One of the arguments used — that the 
excess profits tax "destroys incentive" — is 
a favorite cry of labor exploiters, who 
freely advise labor on the thrill that 
should come to men who work for work's 
sake. 

Rut these labor advisers never apply this 
banquet chatter to themselves. The joy 
of labor, minus profits, is unknown to 
them. 

"We must have an incentive," they say, 
while insisting that labor should acquire 
such a mental attitude that the conscious- 
ness of work well done will be the reward 
for work. 

"You will destroy ambition," they say, 
when labor urges a tax on excess profits. 
And then wage earners are lectured be- 
cause they fail to appreciate the joy of 
laboring under unwholesome conditions for 
labor's sake and are ambitious to improve 
their position. 

This inconsistency is typical of the labor 
exploiter. He demands that labor be "con- 
tented," while applauding every effort by 
other groups of citizens who would discard 
old methods and practices. 

Contentment is the crowning virtue of 
wage earners, in the eyes of labor ex- 
ploiters who scorn this term when applied 
to other individuals. 

The reason for this is clear — if wage 
earners are ambitious this means inter- 
ference with the exploiter's mastery over 
them. 

A contented wage earner is blind to 
social injustice — that's why the anti-union 
employer favors him. 

The contented wage earner never pre- 
sents a wage scale to his employer ; never 
protests against long hours, or insanitary 
work conditions, or aids in creating a pub- 
lic opinion that forces the anti-unionist's 
political agents to favor remedial laws. 

The trade union movement is the ex- 
pression of normal discontent. It blazes 
the workers' path to a better and fuller 
life, and therein is its greatest offense. 

It rejects the "hand-outs" of those who 



can only conceive of wage earners being 
serfs and dependents. 

To maintain this serf status anti-union- 
ists ignore ethics and get twisted in their 
logic — or lack of logic. 

To defend this position they make 
vulgar protests of patriotism and dazzle 
the unthinking with the ponderous efforts 
of hired sophists and scribes. 

They would have one set of ethics for 
themselves and another for wage earners. 
They talk of "the necessity for initiative" 
in one case and "the need for content- 
ment" in the other. 

Labor insists on one standard and re- 
jects the manufactured kind that is in- 
tended to protect the dollar at the cost of 
human beincrs. 



BLANTON IS SLIPPING 



Bleating Blanton is "discovered" in the 
national capita] and can no longer be 
"played up" on the first page of the 
public press. Last week he declared that 
the Government took over the railroads, 
not to win the war, but because the Gov- 
ernment feared the railroad employes 
would strike and tie up transportation 
from coast to coast. "If you passed my 
bill to stop strikes by law. we would 
not have to take over the roads," shrieked 
Blanton. And the newspaper correspond- 
ents cruelly ignored the Texan's bombast. 

Blanton is aware he is slipping, for he 
blamed the International Typographical 
Union. He said there are but "fourteen 
newspapers in the United States" who 
would dare offend this union. There was 
a time when this was considered "hot 
stuff" but now the men in the press 
gallery yawn. 

Blanton 's policy is to remain silent when 
big business or influential persons are in- 
volved and to rave for "the people" on 
minor matters or where he can aim a 
blow at organized labor. He applied his 
system in a discussion in the House on 
a bill to appropriate $48,000,000 to the 
Shipping Board. For an entire day the 
I louse discussed mismanagement and waste 
by the board. Blanton took no part in 
the discussion, nor expressed an opinion 
in any form. Later, when the House 
considered a $2,000 item relating to con- 
tested elections, Blanton howled for econ- 
omy and made vigorous protest against 
"the wasteful expenditure of the people's 
money." 



HAVE YOU NOTICED? 



When some overfed plute's pampered 
dog is observed taking an airing in an 
elaborately furnished limousine, the 
thought naturally occurs that it would 
be more in keeping with civilization for a 
child to occupy the animal's place? 

Then comes the reflection that fre- 
quently these things are only made possi- 
ble through industrial slavery, cxploita- 
t'on of women and child labor. When 
such thoughts have been nursed for a 
given time there springs up a burning 
desire to bring about a balance more 
favorable to the child. 



The statistics of the losses due to strikes 
would be less formidable and more in- 
structive if they could be set off by the 
value of manhood saved in the issue. 



1 Internal; urn nl Seamen's Union j 
'of Aiivorlca ■ 






(Continued from Page 5) 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

H. ESKIN, Secretary 

HOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS* ASSOCIATION 

NEW HAVEN, Conn 13% Collls Street 

LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark Street 

K. B. NOLAN, Secretary 
THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 
Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. \ GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN, Agent 

1501 Columbus Road 

MILWAUKEE, Wis CHAS. BRADHERING. Agent 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich WM. DONNELLY, Agent 

410 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON, Agent 

74 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y Agent 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

CONNEAUT, O A.gent 

992 Day Street. 

TOLEDO, Ohio S. R. DYE, Agent 

618 Front Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 Agent 

3308 East Ninety-second Street 

SUPERIOR, Wis WM. EDGEWORTH, Agent 

724 Tower Avenue 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 71 Main Street 

THOS. CONWAY. Secretary 

ED. HICKS, Treasurer 

Phone Seneca 48 

CLEVELAND, 819 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 410 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 35 West Eagle Street 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 
Telephone Seneca 896 

CHICAGO, III 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Cay Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 571 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 95 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 814 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 1016 First Avenue, South 

P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore Room 21, Alnsworth Building 

SAN PEDRO. Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 86 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203. Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 68 Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 118 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca Street 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box 118 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 
STOCKTON, Cal Labor Temple 



FISH TRAP PILE DRIVERS AND WEB WORKERS 

OF PUGET SOUND AND ALASKA 

IMS Deck Street, Belllntfham, VTaehlmrtOB 



12 



T II E S EA M E N'S JOURNAL 










Labor News 

















Wagon makers and blacksmiths of 
St. Louis arc on strike against a 20 

per cent reduction in wa| 

The Standard Oil Company has 

announced a reduction in wages in 

California of 10 per cent, to take 

i ( Ictober 1. An approximate 

of 25,000 men are affected in the oil 

Is and refineries. 

Disturbances in the West Virginia 
fields did not interfere with 
holding the convention of the Na- 
tional Association of Postoffice Em- 
ployes, which opened at Charleston, 
W. Ya., September 5. 

orts to organize thi 
pickers in San Joaquin are being 
made and several meetings have 
been held. A petition has been cir- 
culated asking for a charter in or- 
ed labor. The petitioners are 
mand 60 cents an hour for their 
work or $5 a ton on contract basis. 

The strike of the cemetery em- 
ployes at San Francisco was held 
up at the last moment by a tele- 
gram from Samuel Gompers, p 
dent of the American Federation of 
Labor. Gompers instructed themen, 
through John O. Walsh, organizer 
of the A. I", of L., to remain at 
. until further notice. 

Again challenging the right of the 
United States Railroad Labor Board 
t<> dictate the policy governing the 
's dialings with its employes, 
tin' Penn Railway, through 

an application asking the board to 
set aside its recent decision in the 
Federated Shop Crafts case, has re- 
newed its light for the open shop. 

Longshoremen and truckers era- 
ployed by the port commission at 
Seattle. Wash., having voted to ac- 
cept a wage reduction of 10 cents 
an hour on straight time and 15 
cents an hour on overtime, the com- 
mission adopted a resolution pul 
the reduction in effect. This action 
places il" port's wage scale for 
longshore and trucking work on the 
same basis as the scale adopted a 
month a:'', by the other waterfront 
employers of Seattle. 

Judge Everett Smith in the Su- 
or Court. Seattle, recently si 
an order temporarily restraining the 
Cnitcd Mine Workers of America 
from picketing or "otherwise inter- 
fering" with property of the Pacific 
Coast Coal Company at Newcastle, 
Wash. Hearing on an application 
for an injunction was set for Sep- 
ber 8. Coal operators of the 
State recently decided to r< 
the mines on an open-shop basis, 
following failure to arbitrate with 
the union miners, who have been on 
strike since last March. 

Tremendous figures for bail were 
set in Chicago recently. Forty-four 
officials, members and alleged hired 

gers of the Bakers' Union, 
charged witli conspiracy in nine 
separate indictments in the Criminal 

rt, will have to stay in jail until 
their friends come t.. the n 
with cash bonds aggregating $3,960,- 
000. The indictments charging con- 
spiracy to boycott, extort, injure 
business and similar forms of 
law-breaking fix the bonds for 
each of the nine counts at $10 
which means $20,000 in unincum- 
' real estate, or a total of 
$90,0: 180,000 in property 

for each of the forty-four indict- 
ments, valued at $7,°20,0(X). or 
960,000 in cash, must be scheduled 
for the bonds. 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Retldence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than SO days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
Jurlng- that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 



Nelson. Werner 
Nelson. P. A. 
Nilsen. Harald 
Ovist, John 
Osterberg. C. V. 
Optedal, Caspar 
Pendville. N. 
Pedersen, J. M. 
Petersen, BJarm 
Parker, Bert 



Nahlnan. F. 

Nilsen, N. P. 

Olsen, John H. 
Owens, J. W. 
Ogga. Ed 
Pedersen, Emil F. 
Pabus, Laas 
Pedersen, Ole 
Pedersen. O. J. 



Abrahamsen, Haef- 

lan 
Ackerstrom. Oscar 
Aberg, Einar 
Anderson, A. C. 
Anderson, Cornelius 
Antonsen, John 
Aholnlnen. Edvord 
Andersen, Arthur H. 

Blaagaard, Anton 
Baker, Joe 
Boyle. J. 

Bjorkkvist, Ragnar 
Berg, H. J. 
Bussek, Joe 
i F. H. 
Bengtsen, Oscar 
Reiving, Chr. 
Bergstrom, Charles 
Brumpet. Walter 

Church, A. J. 
Carr, Robert 
Cherin, C. 
Canning. James 
Chamberlain, L. C. 
Cederstrom. B. 
■ n. Louis 
Chekan, W. 
Coleman. W. 
Clark, Roland 
Carrigan. E. C. 

Dunne, Jack 
Dyrland, Erick 
ion, Bert 
Donovan, Jerry 
Davidson, J. M. 
Davis, Harold 

Erikson. Sam 
Erikson, Einar 
Erikson, Lars 
Ekengren, Olaf 
Erikson, Nils 
Forbes, Frank M. 
Fugman. Arthur 
Franzell. Arthur 

Gabrielsen, G. C. 
Gustafson, Oscar 
Grau. Axel 
Graudln, Ed. 
Gulliksen. Amandus 
Henriksen, Carl 
Halley. Wm. 

i, Harald 
Healey, Geo. S. 
Halvorsen. Karl 
Hansen, Martin 
Holmen, K. 
Harper, Earl 
Hoed. Hans 
lleggum, Louis 

Johnsen, Ingvald 
Jansen, R. 
Johnson, Dick 
Janson, John 
Johnson, Ellas 
Jenson. James 
Johanson, Matt 
Johnson, Chas. A. 
Johanson, Johan R. 
Johnson. Anton L. 
.Torgensen. Angel 
Jacobs, Henry 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Kallo, K. 

Karlson. G. A. -1190 
Krastln, J. 
Kragstad. A. E. 
Hoppen, Oluf 
Kristlansen, Aarnt 
Knudsen, Andrea 
Larsen, Sigurd 
Lambert. Ed 
I^arsen, Ludvlk 
Lohne, E. 
Lasklnen. Fred 
Livingstone, Ed 
Larson, Rudolf 
Lucy, James 
Llchtenberg, Ben 
Lauritsen, P. E. 
Ljungstrom, Oscar 
Lee, L. 

Millard, Frank 
Martinsen, Ingvald 
Macleod, Alex 
Molder, John 

Monroe, N. S. 
Mengert. Fred 
Mnnre, Thos. 
Margaard. H. 
Nilsson, N. J. 
Nilson, A. H. 
Nolan, Janus 
Nelson. Swan 
Nilson, Carl -302 
Nurse, A. L. 
Nilson. Adolf 
Nergaa-rJ »v 



Augusta, J. 
Andersen, Hans 
Akselsen, George 
Anderson. Marius 
Anderson. Ingemar 
Adrian. P. 
Andersen, D. E. B. 
Alonso, Nicolas 
Andersen, Pete 

Back, Chr. 
Burton, Arthur 
Bowen, W. F. 
Berge, Krlstlan 
Bauer. W. H. 
Bach, Herman 
Budd. Percy 
Bruce. Albert 
Burnett. Norman 
Behring, Chr. 
Bozarth. F. P. 

Church, A. J. 
Curry. H. M. 
Chrlstianson. W. 
Campe, F. T. 
Corrigan. B. B. 
Christensen. Hans 
Carlson, Martin 
Caputo, Samuel 
Campbell, John R. 
Ca risen. Erick 

Disney. Robert 
Dlckensen, A. 
Dampsey. Geo. A. 
Drennan. W. 
Delzell. W. W. 
Danil. E. R. 

Eklung, Victor 
Edvordsen, John 
Elsted. John 
Edvords, Louis 

Frog, Hartvig 
Fox. A. -862 
Fltzpatrick Edvin 
Fredrickson, F. W. 
Gangsrod. Karl 
Gjerde, K. O. 
Gulliksen. Gust 
Gulbransen. Peter 

Harms, F. 
Hefling, Jack 
Halmin, Wm. 
Hahnqvist, Einar 
Hansen, S. P. 
Harper, E. G. 
Hlnton. Henry 
Hultard. Wm. B. 
Hill. Nestor 
Hansen, Nils 
Hon". Ole 
Johnsen, Ludvig 
Johansen, Arthur H. 
Jacobson, M. 
Johnson, Ed. -2294 
Johanson, Olof K. 
Johnson, G. A. 
Jaeobson. Torglls 
Johanson, Henrlk 
Johnson, Alex 
Jensen. Wilhard, E. 
Johansen, Carl 
Jones. A. H. 
Johnson. Gust 
Kllkeary, Frank C. 
Karren, John 
Koernbach. Hugo 
Krlstensen. John 
Kellman. B. 
Kristlansen. J. A. 

Larsen, Emanuel 
Larsen. E. -1345 
Lauritsen, P. E. 
Leeween, A. W. 
Landlung, Chas. 
Lauritsen. Jack 
Larson, A. 
Lawersen, L. 
Lleson. Wm. 
Lynum, A. M. 
Lutton, Theod 
Lyngues. Chr. 
Lund. Eric 
Mlchalson. Harald 
Musch, Chas. 
Mann, Albert 
McPherson, James 
McLean. Angus 
Mclntyre. L. 
McCoy, .1. L. 
McMullen. J. 
Nelsen. Peter 
Nelsen, Ross 
Neelsen. H. J. 
Newland, Ernest 
Nyhagen. Julius 
Nicholson, Ben 
Nurken. Herman 
Nelsen. A. B. 



Pederson. C. E. -1286Permln. J. C. 
Pedersen. Herman Pedersen. E. P. 



Quandt. A. 
Rasmussen, Chr. 
Rod. S. 

Rasmussen, Peter 
Rebour, Frank 

Sandin, P 



Paulsen, O. E. 

Rorvik, Chas. 
Randle. C. W. 
Reilley. Ralph 
Ross. Herbert 
Ronberg, Edvard 
Stetson, Henry 



Sater. P. Pedersen Schrage. P. W. 



Skag, Otto 
1 Saderberg, Albln 
Scarpa. E. 
Stiffler, Roy 
Sherrin, E. 
Strand. Charley 
Skaag. Paul 
Shipley. A. M. 
Steiner, F. 



Schler, T. J. 
Schlrmbel, Rup 
Sarv. H. 
Smith, Aug. 
Scarlett. J. 
Swansen. Axel 
Salonen, Ivori 
Salmar, K. 
Stockburger, C. 



■rg, HJalmar Stidham, C. W. 
Sitts, La Verne Samuelsen, Hugo 



risen. S. 
Sandstodt. E. H. 
Seyfrled, M. 
Thorsen, V. 
' Tasel. John 
Torwloh, Hans 
Tangeros. L. 
Thomsen. Peder 
Theysen, Arthur 
L'nwin, H. 
Wheeler, G. W. 
Welkens, Henry 
Wlger, John 

in, E. W. 
Wilson. Walter 
Westerlund. Albert 



Semberg, John 
Swanson. J. -1013 
Sandvik, H. 
Teneson. J. 
Trlpplett. C. J. 
Thorsen. Hans 
Tugmen. Arthur 
Thorsen. Hans 
Torstinsen, A. J. 
Volley, P. 
Wold. Stadlus 
Ward, Wallace 
Wahlstrom. Eric 
Wallin, A. 
Walker. A. A. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Alaska Fishermen's Letter List. 



Anderson, Hlldlng 
Andersen, Ole 

Albert sen, John 
a udrey, a 

rilt, Walter 

o. A. 

k, Bruce 

Ivatore 

Knut. 
am, R. J. 
i kronning, T 9. 

: ust. 
I imel. 
■ Hal. 



Janssen, M. N. 

John 

son. Fritz. C. 
'i, A. Emil. 
Karlkrsmoll, Sti 

Larsen, Th lor A. 

T.:irsc-n. William 
< >lsen, Johan ( n 

musi en, Peter 
Roni. E. 

Jack 
l. Nils 
Si Imllz. Walter 
Schaffer. Paul 
Smith, R. 
Tannison, Peter 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, E. F. 
Anderson, Olaf 

-1118 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson. Charlie 
A Hint's, George 
M.n Ion. M. 
Bohm. Aut.'. 
Carman. P. 
Fostervold, Kasper 

fson. J. 
Harris, John T. 

• S. Trans. 
Johannes-sen, A If. 
.Tohannessen. Jonas 
Jackson, John 

in, Martin 
Lepp, Alex. 
Laisel. Harry 
Ni^lson, Chr. 
Nielsen, Hans 



Newington, Fred 
Olsson, Chas 

sen, Wilhelm 
Peterson, John 
Parker. Arthur 
Rengsderf. W. 
Rawley, Bruce 
Rubens, CI 
Randle. C. W. 
Saro. W. 
Smith, C. Johan 
Smith, Fred 
Smith, Emil 
Schantj H. 
Tonsfeldt. John 
Torjesen, Gunwald 
Vejvada, Frank 

Vetters. Oscar 
Westerberg, Carl 
Wilenius, J. T. 



Tacoma Letter List. 



sen, John 
Dominguez, Joseph 
Fronlund, Oscar 
Jarvinen, Oscar 

i.org, John 
Kurth, Hans 
Low, G. 
Mat son P. 
Marvis, John T. 
-2016. 



DENTIST 

Hours: 9 a. m. to e:30 p. m. 

EUGENE PAYNE, M.D., D.D.S. 

At 3 Fourth St. Mezzanine Floor 

California Theatre Building 
Market St. Corner Fourth St. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER «. HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1— Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1890 
WEN'S CLOTHING, SHOES. HATS 

and FURNISHING GOODS 
108-110 Main Street, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SIIHES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



UNION LABEL 
SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

NYMAN BROS. 

Bee Hive Store 

Men's Furnishings, Hickory Shirts, 

Hats, Oil Clothing. 

Home of the Union Made 

Co-operative Shoe. 

302 So. F Street, ABERDEEN, Wash. 

on the Water Front. 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

A (GUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Magnunon, E. W. 

Nelson, Andrew B. 
Rengsdorf. W. 
Robinson, Lawrence 
Walter 
Fran 
Smith, John 
Smith, Carl Johann 
Scully John 
Thompson, T. 



Honolulu Letter List. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts.. Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Freitas, Daniel 
Gustafson, Erick 
Vungman, W. H. 
Kaine, James 



Lee. Robert 
Lauber, Emil 
Olsen, C. W. 
Wlllardsen, Wilhelm 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 

"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars. Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 

219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



INFORMATION WANTED 

James Kenney of Philadelphia, last 

seen in Pennarth, Wales, is inquired 

for by V. McMahon, 96 Plain street, 

Providence, R. I. 6-1-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Anders Teodor Turesson, born at 
Gothenburg, will please notify The 
Swedish Firemen's Union, Gothen 
burg 7, Sweden. 11-24-JO 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Anderson, H. M. Lund, Olai 

1495 Lobelos, Jose 

Albertson, John Luce, Paul 

Anderson, Sam Ligovski, Joe 

Anderson, ('has. A. Laursen. Max O. 
Andersaon, Gust B. Luhrs, Ludwig 
Arnesen, Isack Lorenzen, Jean 

Anderson Harold M Loven, C. 
Anderson, B. A. Lauritzen, Ole 

Andersen. J. N. 

Andersson. O. G. B. MrCart, Albert 
Anderson, Gunner McConniek, Harold 
Anderson, Harry B. McMullen, Dan 
Alto. John-1349 McCloskey, W. 

Anderson, CliarlovH McBridge, George 
McVay, Frank 
Miller, Fred 
Miller, B. 
Muller. Frederik 
Malmquist. Gus 
Mattson, Maurice 
Machen, L. E. 
Mize, J. H. 
Melaa, Peder 

Neville, Thomas 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nielsen, S. 

Olsson. P. 
O'Donnell, Jas. 
Ossante. Anthony 
Olsen, Henning 
Ovist, John 
Olsen, Ferdinand 
Onnu, Tobias 
Olsen, Ole-1329 

Pastorillen. H. K. 
Paton, J. P.-20S2 
Persson, Bernhard 
Peterson, O. E.-1558 
Petterson, Axel 

Rogers. Robert G. 
Romani, Gaetano 
Rengsdorf, W. 
Rokow, Steve 
Runska. Henry 
Runge, Robert 
Reidel, Gus 
Ruygrok, Dick 

Sutert, Ole 
Stenberg, Alf 
Steinbrick, Paul 
Sandblom, H. 
Sorensen. Edwin 
Smith, Albert 
Sandback, Geo. 
Sund, Lewis 
Stewart, Elder 
Schierenbeck. Kail 
Sandberg, N. A. 
Sether, S. J. 
Smith, Albert 
Schellhous, Wm. 
Sunde. O. 

Sandstrom, Hjalmar 
Selzer, Max 
Samuelsen. H. M. 
Stensland. Pavil 
Shaeffer, Ray 
Stenros, John 
Sakariassen, Bernh 
Seagren, E. 
Seaman, Fred 
Schmidt. H. T. L. 
Svendsen, Geo. E. 

Thornlund. John 
Thompson. Maurice 

Viets, C. L. 
"Verney, A. 
Viscarra, Oscar 

Woide, John 
Wilson, John 
"Winkelman, Otto 
Williams, Prank 
Wennerquist, Anton 
Wilhelmson, Karl 
Wright. Charlie 
Westura, Willie 
Williams, Irving 
Winsten, Gustaf 

Young. William 
Young, Carl 
Young. Ragnar 
Zetbury, Harold 

Registered Mail 
McVay, Frank 
Murphy, Edward 
Viets, C. L. 
Silla, Joseph 
Braest, K. 
Haierup, Axel J. 
McCormick, Harold 
Nixon, Leonard 

Packages 

Campbell. J. R. 
Hennum, Christ 
I !oi Hey, F. L. 
Stenensen, A. 
Hansen, Oscar-2171 



Bersin, Jacob 
Boom, A. E. 

Bordeaux, E. T. 
Boe, Ivor 

Carr, R. W. 
Cameron. Robert 
(.'arisen, Dirk 
Crawford. Thom is 
Cormie. William 
Craig, Theodore 
Catherwood, Horace 
Clementsen, Alf 
Cristen, Jolin 
Carroll, Kenneth 
Carr. Robert R. 
Calcoff, Sa 
Cordeau, Thomas 
Cords, W. A. 
Cumalet, John H. 

Deaver, A. 
Dyrland. Erick 
Dreyer, J. O. 
Daunt, C. 

Everlsen. Olaf 
Eliassen. Emil 
Evensen, Alex 
Eliasson, Gi 
Eriksson, Julius W. 
Erlckson, J. E. 
Evans, John 
Evertsen, Olaf 

Forsberg. Alfred 
Fernandez, Chas. 
Fritze, Harrv 
Fors, Ellis 

Galleberg, M. 
Gregovich, Mark 
Gray, A. 
Gomez, F. 

Gregersen, Kristian 
Gaide. Wm. 
Gunnerud. Ulrik 

Hecker, W. 
Harvev, Earl S. 
Hall. Robert E. 
Hickey, John 
Hellman. Max 
Horton, Geo. A. 
Ha nlon, "William 
Hanson. Harold 
Hurley. Michael 
Heino, A. 
Horner, Ambrose 
Harbst, John-2905 

Jacobsen. Tom 
Johansen, Johan 
Johnson, Gunmar 
Johnson. F. K. 
Jorgensen, J. 
Johnson, Tom 
Jensen, Paul 
Jonassen. Johannes 
Jensen, Kristian 
Jorgensen, Jens G. 
Janson, Jack R. 
Johansson, Albert 
Jonessen. Fred 
Johnson, C. A. 
Johnson, Oscar 
Johanson, Ed 
Jones. Arne M. 
. Johanson, N. A. 
Jorgensen. Knud 
Jensen. Marius 
Jomo, John 
Johansen, J. -1432 

Iwersen, W. 

Killatt. Daniel 
Koff. Michael 
Knudsen, Andrew 
Kopatz, Oscar 
Kaartinen, Sam 
Kallio, Frans A. 
Koski, Juho 
Kalnin, Ed 
Dodersen, John 

Lill, Karl 
Lindroos, Oskar 
Lehan, C. 
Larsen, Olaf J. 
Lueder, Wm. 
Lund, F. 
Lindholm, Chas. 



Seamen! Have You Got a Copy of Axtell's 

Book, "Rights and Duties of Merchant 

Seamen"? 

It contains a digest of the maritime and statutory law which any seaman 
can understand. 

It is an education as to your rights as well as your duties. It will protect 
you wherever you are. It deals fully with the subject of wages, breach of 
contract of hiring, salvage, personal injury, maintenance, consul's duties 
and powers, authority of the master and officers and duty of the seamen 
to the ship and master; digest of your rights under the Constitution of 
the United Slates. Enclose a dollar in an envelope and we will mail you 
a copy. Reduced rates in quantities. 

RIGHTS & DUTIES PUBLISHING CO. 

9 State St. Iver Olbers, A. B., Sales Manager New York City 



V/or.l<Vs Workers 



OWORKERS UNION 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 

Peaceful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
I -isputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLLIS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE, General Secretary-Treasure* 



UNIOWTOTAiv 

Factory 



INFORMATION WANTED 



ATTORNEY 

ARTHUR LAVENBURG 

116 Broad Street, New York City 

Announces he has enlarged his offices and will continue to 
furnish free legal advice to all seafaring men. Inquiries by 
mail should be brief. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Frank Hines, John Ryan and 
Harold Wood, who claim to have 
been forced off the SS. "West Que- 
chee" in France, December 14, 1919, 
please report or communicate with 
me at once. S. B. Axtell, Nine State 
street. New York. 4-20-21 



Old Reliable and Up-to-Date 

TOM WILLIAMS 

EXCLUSIVE TAILOR 
FOR MEN 

28 Sacramento Street 

Phone Douglas 48 7 4 



1 am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crews of the follow- 
ing vessels. In most cases, action 
lias been commenced. In some cases 
the funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney with 
me. "Anacortes vs. Barge 95," 
"Alabama vs. Brandywine," "Bell 
Haven vs. Riverside Bridge," "Bak- 
ersfield vs. Eastern Sailor," "Beau- 
mont vs. Baladan," "Chester Valley 
vs. Campbello," "Cacique vs. Carta- 
gena," "Dachet vs. Hutchinson," 
"Delavan vs. Pennsylvanian," "Delana 
vs. Nevasco," "Devolente vs. Winova 
County," "Elkton vs. Cold Spring," 
"Eastern Glen vs. Andrew Jackson," 
"Silverado vs. Lake Faristan," "East 
Indian vs. Lake Flag," "Eastern 
Shore vs. .Boston Bridge," "Eastsidc 
vs. Volunteer," "Eastern Sun vs. 
Jekyle," "Federal vs. Monamac," 
"Gypson Prince vs. Queen Makon- 
ing," "Glenwhite vs. Wathena," "H. 
F. Morse vs. Capulan," "Hadnot vs. 
Allentown," "Hickman vs. Faraby," 
| "Intan vs. Putnam," "Ida vs. West 
Hepburn," "Lake Strabo vs. Lake 
Franconia," "Louisiana vs. Tallac," 
"Lake Freezcout vs. Liberty," 
"Mesholee vs. Johnson City," 
"Moosehausic vs. Jcne L. Summer- 
ville," "Monasses vs. Eastern Queen," 
"New Briton vs. Braebrum, "Orcus 
vs. Johnson City," "Pawlet vs. Yana," 
"Pratt vs. Irish," "Shannock vs. 
Dcvo," "Sacanac vs. War Hagara," 
"Sutransco vs. Swedco," "Tollard vs. 
Gunston Hall," "Quabbin vs. Far- 
uam," "Tunica vs. Neponier," "West 
Katan vs. Navel," "West Harcouver 
vs. West Hemmetite," "Western 
Hope vs. Impico," "Western Comet 
\s. Nordica," "Western Queen vs. 
." "Westford vs. Osha- 
loosa and Osakis," "West Segovia 
vs. Wampum," "Western Comet vs. 
Nesco," "Western Pride vs. West 
Silkirk," "West .Maxinuts vs. Moose- 



hausic," "Western Front vs. Silver 
Queen," "Wonahbe vs. Consort," 
"Cold Spring vs. Lycoming," "Be- 
noni vs. West Hargrave," "West 
Harcouver vs. Ozaukee." S. B. Ax- 
tell, 9 State St., New York City. 



Mrs. Hattie McClellan, 510 James 
Street, Seattle, Washington, is desir- 
ous of locating her son, George L. 
McClellan, age 21; last heard from 
about year ago in Norfolk, Va. 
3-9-21 



Mrs. Jeremiah T. Murphy, 39 Geer 
Street, Glens Falls, N. Y., is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
son, Timothy J. Murphy, last heard 
of in March, 1919, at Burkeburnett, 
Texas. Those knowing his where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
his mother. 8-31-21 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Seamen who know about the cir- 
cumstances and facts causing the 
death of the following seamen 
aboard the designated steamships 
should communicate with Frederick 
R. Graves. Attorney-at-Law, 256-257 
Broadway, New York City, X. Y. 

Joao De Silva, a fireman aboard 
the S. S. "Norfolk," on voyage com- 
mencing January 22, 1920, at Brook- 
lyn, for South American ports. 

John Lewis, a seaman aboard the 
S. S. "Mongolia." 

Frank Lett, a seaman aboard the 
S. S. "West Point," the early part 
of January, 1921. 

Cesanio farina, a wiper aboard 
the S. S. "El Mundo." on November 
10, 1920, while said vessel was at 
Pier 51, North River, New York. 

lose Maria Perez, while working 
for the Ship Service Corporation .in 

flu S. S. "Edyecombe." 

Anders Gunnar Andersson, a deck 
engineer aboard the S. S. "West 
' oi nifax," "ii I December 1 1, 1920, 
w hile the said «es 'I was at Pii i 
Brooklyn, .Yew York. 



Twelve million persons can claim 
unemployment benefits under the 
terms of the unemployment insur- 
ance act in Great Britain. 

In Scotland current wages for a 

■ '. of 44 hours are as follows: 
Iron factory workers, $40 to $50; 
coal miners, $30; shipwrights and 
joiners, $25; engineers, $20; painters, 
$25; ship platers and riveters, $40 to 
$50; railway and municipal workers, 
$20, and masons, $25. 

WOrkers of Japan are slowly hut 
surely enforcing the right to organ- 
ize. Recently the Mitsubishi ship- 
building interests authorized the for- 
mation of a commission of workmen 
in their shipbuilding yards in Kobe 
as an organization to represent the 
interests of the workmen in the ad- 
ministration of the plants. 

'flic Trades Union Congress as- 
sembled at Cardiff, Wales, under 
conditions of depression and per- 
plexity, owing to the bad industrial 
outlook, widespread unemployment 
and fears of further wage reductions. 
'flic delegates also seem to look 
with apprehension on a few uncer- 
tain processes within the trades union 
movement . 

Using the approved American Plan 
methods, the Argentine Patriotic 
League (100 per cent), aided by all 
the resources of the Argentine gov- 
ernment, has succeeded in breaking 
the port workers' strike at Buenos 
Aires. The determination for 
thorough labor solidarity, however, 
is not by any means destroyed by 
this temporary set back. 

In the Netherlands, the law of 
October 24, 1920, which established 
a legal maximum for labor of 45 
hours a week, an eight-hour day and 
half holiday Saturdays, is operating 
satisfactory. In spite of the fact that 
the country depends more upon 
manual labor than labor-savins ma- 
chinery, the pessimistic prophi 
of commercial interests are being dis- 
proved. 

The labor members of Poplar bor- 
ough council, London, England, 
headed by George Lansbury, editor 
of the Daily Herald,- the national 
labor organ, have been arrested. 
The arrests grew out of their resist- 
ance of an order of the high court, 
requiring- them to raise tax rates in 
accordance with educational and im- 
provement programs of the London 
County Council. 

Last year the Belgium Metal 
Worker's federation paid 5,691,766 
francs for benefits, divided as fol- 
lows: Strike benefits, 2,374,256 
francs; unemployment insurance, 1,- 
156,353 francs: sick benefits, 1,734,- 
762 francs; accident benefits, 246,- 
393 Francs. A franc in normal times 
is 19' j cents. With the exception 
of the miners, the federation is the 
largest trade union in Belgium. 

Anti -militarist propaganda is basic 
among the European trade unions. 
At its last congress the International 
Transport Workers' federation ap- 
propriated a considerable sum for 
the light against militarism. In 
fan's organized labor is unanimous 
against the bill prohibiting anti- 
militarisl pn ipaganda now before the 
French parliament. The bill is un- 
derstood to lie the child of the gen- 
eral staff of the French army. It 
prohibits all anti-militarist pi 
ganda, "irrespective of the form or 
means" which is likely to induce 
regular or reserve naval and mili- 
tary "ratings" to violate discipline 
oi- disobej orders. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



I Domestic and Naval 



il 



Eight 5000-ton Shipping Board 
steamers have been withdrawn from 
service as feeder ships for the Vi 
miral Line in the Orient. 

The steamship "City of Atlanta" 
of the Ocean Steamship Conn 
inward bound from Savannah, with 
passengers and freight, went 

tie island in Boston harbor, 

August 

Federal M g e Manton ordered the 

receivers for the United States Mad 
Steamship Company to return im- 
mediately to the Shi Board 
mne chartered steamships which 
were seized by the Board on the 
ground of non-payment of rental. 

The restrictive immigration law 
was the cause of many Atlantic 
steamships rushing to port last 
week, in efforts to be first to arrive 
in September, with immigrants 
countries whose monthly _ quotas 
were in danger of being restr, 

Dirigible balloon D-6, the lar, 
naval aircraft of it, type the kite 
balloon A. P., and the blimp U-l. 
were destroyed by fire, which also 
razed the hangar, at Rockaway Point 
naval air station last week. An ex- 
plosion of gasoline, from an un- 
known cause, started the blaze. 

The hark "Narwhal," 583 tons, 
one of the old-timers of the Pacific 
Coast, is going to enter the movies. 
Mrs 1 \ Pederson, the owner, has 
chartered the craft to William Fox 
for use in a Dustin Farnum produc- 
tion off San Pedro. The vessel will 
be squired a month or more .r, .the 
production. She was bu.lt m 1883. 

None of the Shipping Board's 
wooden steamers on the- I 
Coast are included in the 205 
recently sold by the Shipping 
at $2100 each. All of the "lame 
ducks" moored at Atlantic 
were included, but neither the Heel 
at Alameda nor the one at Lake 
Washington were included in the 
sale. 

The Charles R. McCormick & 
Co.'s entire fleet of vessels, the 
"Celio," "Wapama," "Willamette, 
•Multnomah.'- "Wakenna" and the 
"Ernest H. Meyer," is being n 
with new and modern ra 
ment. manufactured and installed by 
Gray & Danielson Manufacturing 
San Francisco. The equipment 
is the same as that installed on the 
•'Everett" for this company a year 
ago and is fitted with means for tin- 
operation with the Naval Radio 
rnpass Stations through which the 
captains may secure their true bear- 
ings in foggy weather. The trans- 
mitting range of apparatus 
will be more than 500 mil 

Discontinuance of all target prac- 
drills and engineering competi- 
tions during the remainder of the 
fiscal year, affecting flotilla 2, which 
includes fifty destroyers of the re- 
e fleet, and squadron 11, vessels 
heretofore on semi-active service, has 
dered by Bear Admiral Guy 
Burrage in accordance with Navy 
Department instructions. The order 
will affect a total of seventy de- 
n-over-. Limited appropriations for 
fuel was assigned as the reason for 
the issuance of the curtailed opera- 
tions order. The Government also 
suspended the operation of a de- 
stroyer to carry officers and men 
between San Diego and San Pedro 
on week-end liberty. "Vessels here- 
after only will he operated for urgent 
military reasons." was the gist of 
the Navy Department order. 



Member of the Federal Reserve System 
And Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH. Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets 

Deposits ------- 

Capital Actually Paid Up 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - 

Employees' Pension Fund - ■ 



Wengren, Karl 
\\ • ol. A. de 

land, Fred 
Weister, Willi 
Werner, Chas. P. 

i berg, Otto 
Whalley, A. J. 
Wiekland. Victor 
Wiltavainen, George 



Wijkander. Eric 
Wilhelm. Brick 

Williams. R. H. 
Winther, Johan 
Wood, Richard 
Worman. Albert 
Wypocky. Anthony 

Ziehr, Ernst 



$71,383,431.14 

67,792,431.14 

1,000,000.00 

2,591,000.00 

357,157.85 



PACKAGES 

Bergqvist, Johan W. Kallio, F. 
Kower, i;. K. Klemmetsen, 



*"• VJ - »*■ cviiruiiiiciacii, c 

Cliristensen, Richard Lange, Walter 
Clark, Fred W. Ljungqvist, Hj 

Carpenter. Harold Lyueek. Thorn* 



Sigurd 



OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO TOURNT Vice-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vlce-Pres. and Cashier 

OKU. iuuiuni, e t KRTJSE Vice-President 

A. H. MUI.LER, Secretary 

WM D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

O A BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Lasnier 

"• D c W HEYER, Manager Mission Branch 

W C HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 
'O 'P PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H.^ |CHMIDT 

F E< T T KRV3B HUGH GOODFELLOW 

E. T. KRUSE^ g SHERMAN WALTER A 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS, MOORE & ORR1CK, 



E. A. CHRISTENSON 

E. N. VAN BERGEN 

ROBERT DOLLAR 

HAAS 

General Attorneys 



arold 
Dommelen, G. 
Dreyer, Trygve 
Elliott, Arthur W 
Enberg, E. 
Fiseher. Chas. O. 
Faperberg, T. 

Fosse, H. 

Hallenberg, G. 
Hansen, Hans 
Rood. A]e\. 
Hughes. Earl B. 
in' -iries«en. 
Keith. J. 



Lybeck, Thomas 
Laraen. J -»nla 
Maloney, J. J. 

Murphy, T. 
O'Connor. John J. 
OlSBon, Pari J. 
Rusch. R. H. 
Seining. James E. 
Stein. X. 
Sidoroft. N. 
Taylor, James B. 
Wacmer. R H 
A. -2277 Weishaar, Rudolph 



San Francisco Letter List 

Memoes whose mall Is advertised in 
these columns should "once notify 
<5 A Silver Business Manger. ine 
Seamen's Journal. 59 Clay Street San 
Francisco. Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San ^™* e g" a 3°£ 
Union Office are advertised for Mi ee 
months only and *IU be «-«t«™«' to f I*£ 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 



McLean, Donald 
Melander, Gus L. 

Melin. M. M. 
Mess, Willy 

I. J. 
Mello, M. N. 

ien, John E 
Mikkelsen, Olaf M. 
Miller, Emil 

ar R. 

Moseley, T. E. 
Monsen, Chas. 
Murpl 

Murphy, James 
Murphy, Thomas 



,, Austin 

en, BernerGrenne, Olaf U. 



Uankin, Orrin 
Kasmussen, Aksel 
Reb. Walter A. 

leer, Mike 
R< iii.i. Gustav 
Reiersen, Johan A. 
Reiesgord, Hillm. 
in, ('. W. 
Robbins, Edwin 
Robei tsen, Jorgen 

ii i. 
Rogers, Arthur 
Rogerson, Allan 

-1736 
Ronning, Birger 
Rundstiom. Albert 



INFORMATION WANTED 



amsson 
Gustav 
aim. us, Walter 

-on, Charli 
-2001 
Andersen, Chas. 
Theo. 

son, John -21-44 i i 
•on, Axel 
Andersson, Chas. 

-1011 T 

Andersson, C. J. 

Anderson. Ingard 
Vndwerck, August 
Ai.lt. And son 
Arnstsen, Existlan 

Edward 
Austin, Tom 



Groth. 

Grundel, W. C. A. 

Gullaksen, Hans 



Nalal, Henry De 

\ Ison, John G -136SSager, W. 



, Norval 
en, Geo. 

Win. 

Hanson, O. -2099 
George B. 

c. 

l1 ' T - T O 

Hendricksen. J. K. 
Hetland. Hnlvor 
Hildama, S. P. 
Hjerling, HJ. 
Hobby, Win. 

Holmstrom, Emil 
Holmstrom, Fritz 
Howdle, Dennis 

Hubbard. Michael 
1 [uber, i !has. L. 
Hunter. Ernest 

ig, Thos. 
Huse, i'-'i" 
Hutton, Geo. W. 

tch, ' »tto 
Jahnke, Paul 
Jahnke, Richard 
Bon, J. E. 
a. John A. 
-2203 
Jensen. C. A. 
Jensen, Chas. A. 
Jensen, .lens - 

Jewell. Al. M. 

Johanson.Jonas R. 
Johansen, Walti 
Johansson, Rudolf 

Johansson, W. 

-1334 
Johnsen, Norman 
Johnson, Carl w. 

Johnson, Edwa. L. 
on, Axel 
on. C. J- 
-1566 
,.,, Carl -1601 j ons on. H. ErlcK 
Carlsson, Gustav Jorgensen. Emil 

.771; Juniper. Foster P. 

Catechi. G. V. 
Phristensen, Rich. Kamm. .I..I111 

Karlson. William 
1, Einar Kasperson.l " 
Christinson, William K latt, Henn 
Chrlstofferson, John Klemetsen, E 
Ion Kilhstrom. . 



in, Steve 
Nelson. N. -489 
Niger, Oskar 
Nlery, D. R. 
Nilsen, Nils M. 

n. Gustav 
Iro 

..lisen. 
Nilsson, S 
I Hiding 

L. A. 



W. 



Salrrunen, K. 
Sarin. Martin 
Schaeffer, George 

V. 
Schibon. Paul 
Schneider, Hein 
ireff, Paul 

Ancker Schroeder. C. F. 

H. Itz, George 

Schweitzer, A. A. 



Joseph T. Ragen is anxious to 
lain the whereabouts of Dan 
I laley, a member of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, last seen at San 
Pedro in February, this year. Kindly 
communicate with the above named 
at Sailors' Union, San Pedro, Calif. 



Mrs. L. Greenberg, 31 Lambert 
street, Roxbury, Mass., is anxious to 
ascertain as to the whereabouts of 
Charles Kasak, a member of the 
Marine Firemen's Union of the At- 
lantic, last heard of in New York, 
October, 118. 6-22-21 



Nixon, L. A. Shapiro, Joseph 

Wilnen Nils E. -609shultz. W. E. G. 
Nordstrom, H. loroff, N. 

11 berg. Alfred Sidorof, S 



Baardsen, Hans M. 

G - „ , T 
Backman. Paul J. 

S, II. L; 

I. C. F. 
1,1, Kurt 
Bassin, Georg 
Benway. Chas. 1 • 
Bjorkvlst, Rai 
Bjorseth, Einar 
ii. Konrad 
gren, M. 
V*. 1. 
Born, Carl 

ui. Alfred 
Brandt, B. 

hi, Martin 
Brown. Edward E. 
Brink, Harold 
ey. R- E. 
raf, Albert 
Burton, Art 
Bye, K. 
Bywater, Chas. E. 

Carlson, Chas. F. 

,n, Julius 
Carlson, S. A. 

m, Ted 



Nordlincr. Gust 
Nurmi.Wm. 



11. V. E. 
1. Johannes 

en, Kris! Ian 

a. 1 itt.i B. 
I ilsen, Alt'. 
1 >ls. 11. Ann del -1634 
Olsen. Herman 

-1340 
oioen. Ole J. -10211 Stone. M. C. 

irupN. Swanson, Eric K 
1. Axel -1506 
Albin 
Orserhowsky. Leo 
Oraya, Enrique 



Smith, Carl Johan 
Sobel, Ralph 
Sonne, Herman 
Sorensen, N. M. 

-2447 
Speller. Henry 

eland, In- 
stall. Ralph M. 
Steffensen. Henry 
Sternberg. Hj. N. 
St.wart. J. H. 
Stinson, Harry 



Kllemann, Otto 
Klindt. F. 
Klossas. M. 
Knapp, G. W. A. 
Knudsen. Martin 
Knudsen, Rangvald 
Koch 

iila. Demetrius A 
r, Walter 

Krlstoffersen, H. O. 

Krause, Arthur 
Kuckens. Bernard 

v.C. 
Inline, Gustaf 
Larsen. Alfred F. 
I .arson, Finvald 
Larsen, Kaare T. 
Larson, 1 

11. Paul S. 

Layne, Julian 
Leikanger, Bens 

Lidsti 

Ii krantz, Fred 
Lindenau, E. 
Lindroos, Fred 
Little. M. R. 
Love, Ralpf s. 

.lames 
Lund, Billy 

I. Win. .1. 
Lundgren. Ludvlk 
Luoma, Waino 
Lyman, T. 

MagQusson. Carl 

on, A. G. 
Mannonen, N 
Everett E. Mattos, M. D. 
kenzie. Ed. 
Gaare, Johan McCormick. H. W. 

Gabrlelsen, Lasr McCudden. F. 
Gabrielsen, Peder McFarlan. Carl F. 
Giske, Karl McLean, Augus 



ly, Frank 
Cox, Edward 
, v, Allen 

Fred A. 
. ,,. Tom R- 
Have 
rt, Wilbert 

Czarnetsky, F. 

1 nihl. Albert 
Danielsen, August 

P. 
1 eCoe, E. 
Delhi, Ole 
Diez, Harry 

■r, Trygve 
I lumber, E. 
P, G. 

.It, John 
-en, Hans 
Elliott, A. W. 

Prank L. 
Eriksson, Gustav 
Bsterhill. G. B. 

Foor.Henning 

Ford. 1 '. 
Ford, E. H. 
Ford, Dough 
Foster, C. 
Fosse. Harald 
Franson, Albin 
k. Frank 
Freitag, Wm. J- 
Friberg/ Chas. A. 

n. Arthur 
Fuller, 



t isman, J. 

1 isses, Andrew 

( Istlund, John 

1 H lo. Kurst 

1 iverwick, Thos. 

Palm, Axel 
fankratz, B. 
Paul, Raymond 
en. Axel J. 
en, M. -1535 
en, Hans 
1 eder 

m, Martin 
J. M. 

1. lining 
irnst 
Pett, Richard 
1 '. it.'rson, C. V. 
Pett. Dick 

sen, Eysten 
Pihlplk, C. 
Plhlstrom, R. J. 
Pinder, C. 

Tony 
Pllkinton, Homer 
Pope, Bert 

Powell, .1. E. 

. Kustaa 
.-en, 
Pugh, John 



Tammola. Waino 
Tanum, Helge 

: anil 
Tennenhaus. Harry 
Terry, J. E. 
Thompson. Gus 
Thomson, Geo. H. 
Thome. A. W. 
Thorsen, Carl 
Tiffany. Ralfp 
Tiiniii. rmann. W. 
Tings! 10111. A. R. 
Tjersland, S\ erre 

1 . Wesley 
Tomlin, Edward 

T01 « Ick, H. S. 
Tourtellot, W. L. 
Tosh. James M. 
Truman, Aug. 
Tyson, W. 
Twigg, H. M. 

Valdez, William 
Vanquest, Ernst 
A'dKooy, S. F. F. 
nstedt, Wm. 

Walters, Herbert 
Walker, A. 
Watson, A. 
Wayne. Chas. 
Walenius. Peter 
Nicolai Weigel, Gust 

\\ elteverde, John 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Joseph Bert Riese, a native of 
Cleveland, Ohio, last heard of De- 
cember 1, 1919, in Savannah, Ga.. 
when he shipped on the SS. "West 
Apaim," please communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Joseph Riese, 4120 
Bailey avenue, Cleveland, O. 

6-29-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Olaf Erling Hendriksen, a native 
of Norway, age 33, last heard from 
on the Atlantic Coast, kindly com- 
municate with his brother, Albert 
Hendriksen, Aalo Post Office, Chris- 
tiansand, Norway. 6-1-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Charles Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, last heard of in 1916, 
address P. O. Box 673, Juneau, 
Alaska. His father, Peter Iverson, 
is anxious to hear from him. Kindly 
communicate with A. Johnsen, P. O. 
Box 65, Seattle, Wash. 7-20-21 



Phone Kearny 6361 Union Tailors 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 
50 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ph «<u, fc ,d.379 Your Old Friend I Q j7 ^ £ I S S 
WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 




92 FOURTH ST. nr. MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Union-Made Shoes for Men Exclusively 

Repairing Done While You Walt 

We u«e only the best leather that the market affords 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 
268 MARKET STREET 

Coiducted by Capt. Chss. Ehler» 
Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSENS 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING. FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonablf 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 

Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



GEO. A. PRICE 



S A Y S 



'ALL TOGETHER BE A BOOSTER 

STAND BY THE UNION LABEL 

AND WHAT IT SIGNIFIES." 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Office —Phones — Residence 

Garfield 1649 West 1400 

Habla Espagnol and Parla Italiana 

DR. J. D. REENG 

Genito-Urinary Diseases a Specialty 

Office Hours: 11 to 12:30 a. m. and 

3:30 to 7:30 p. m. 

709-710 Phelan Blda.. 760 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for instance. 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET. Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Carl Tossavainen, a former mem- 
ber of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, a native of Kuopio, Finland, 
age 33 years, last heard from on the 
Pacific Coast in. February, 1913; 
any one knowing his whereabouts 
will please communicate with Busi- 
ness Manager, The Seamen's Journal, 
San Francisco, Cal. 12-1-20 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "'SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5.00 

UNIFORMS and SUITS, TO ORDER and READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 



36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



AT THE DENVER CONVENTION 

the American Federation of Labor took official 
notice that 

—huge losses were suffered by workers last year 
through purchases of fraudulent and worthless 
securities. 

Convention Resolved 

—to call upon the United States Government "to rid 
the country of fraudulent schemers" 

— to assist the Government to bring to the attention 
of the union members the advantages of buying 
Treasury Savings Securities, issued in denomina- 
tions of 25c, $1, $5, $25, $100, $1000 

Buy Them Through Your Post Office or Bank 
Government Loan Organization 

Second Federal Reserve District 
120 Broadway, New York 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



1 ^v^ ® 1 

f ■ >\ \ 
/ % \ \ 


Headquarters For Dependable Shoes 

FOR MEN 

Agents for 

W. L. Douglas 
Walk Ease 
Just Wright 

\ DDirC'C 58 THIRD STREET, S. F. 
■" i IXIvLi U Between Market and Mission 



SMOICFRS See t* 13 * this label < in light blue ) a PP ears on the 
1V1 KJ IV Ea IV J box m w hich you are served. 

PfSted^^^£2M2^fs[ PT. 1830 
Issued by Authority 01 the Cigar Makers Intern. 

^-35. Union-made Cigars. 

^K5ptS?\ 3hi£ fifTlrfU? ll»t Uw Oowi eom*r.<l lnlr.it 601 Mrt bow wll *ft llS-Uto TO 
fsM3SS.v\ nu.uti*0l wau*iuun'i*\Wutitoiui\j*!0*<t a«*»u inorMnuHwdrvolBdnHujd. 
IsIWeStVi^I »anor»ent of tht WOSAt M>TtHm>nd iNTULICIHAL wtt(*i>r OF THi OtWX Jovftorj mimtmmmi 

\ -A ' vMi^y T# U«MCiairst9 ill snoMfiulrOijnNouttht world. 

V CM/Ucf. 



m News from Abroad 



€,. 



I 



The police of Budapest claim to 
have discovered a revolutionary plot 
which they claim is financed by 
bolshevists and I. W. \Y. 

Calcutta reports state that the po- 
lice in the Punjab have discovered a 
conspiracy among the Sikhs to over- 
throw the British and assassinate all 
Europeans. 

The Melbourne, Victoria, labor 
congress closed endorsing the so- 
cialization of industry. The One 
Big Union preamble and scheme of 
organization was one of the main 
resolutions adopted. 

American medical men, who have 
recently returned from Europe, esti- 
mate that approximately 81) per cent 
of the children in Central Europe 
are deformed as the result of mal- 
nutrition suffered during the war. 

The engineers and firemen of the 
Great Northern Irish Railway, who 
recently went on strike as a result 
of a dispute with the management, 
returned to their posts on the advice 
of .1. II. Thomas, general secretary 
of the National Union of Railway- 
men. 

A Costa Rican military expedition 
will take possession of the Coto re- 
gion, which was awarded to Costa 
Rica by former Chief Justice White 
of the United States, and concern- 
ing which a recent ultimatum was 
sent to Panama by Secretary of 
State Hughes. 

Advices received by the marine 
department of the Chamber of Com- 
merce from London state that the 
steamer Solano from Callao, pre- 
viously reported arrived at Balboa 
on August 25, was damaged on the 
voyage and will be placed in dry- 
dock for a survey and repairs. 

The Vancouver, B. C, agents of 
the North Atlantic and Western 
Steamship Line were advised re- 
cently that the steamer "Yalza" of 
that line had picked up the captain 
and crew of thirty-nine men of the 
British steamer "Ferngarth," which 
capsized and sank off the Island of 
Nevassa. The "Yalza" was on her 
way from Vancouver to New York. 

Geneva reports that the engineer- 
ing firm of Sulzer, at Winterthur, 
has received an order from the 
American government for $5,000,000 
worth of Diesel motors for sub- 
marines. An order for £1,250.0(10 
for similar motors was received a 
few weeks ago by the same firm 
from the Japanese government. The 
Sulzer firm makes a specialty of 
Diesel and large motors for sub- 
marines. 

Cable advices have been received 
by the Cunard Line stating thai the 
steamship "Maurctania" has been 
converted into an oil burner at the 
yards of Swan Hunter i\- VVigham 
Richardson, Limited. Newca 
England, the original builders. The 
conversion will proceed at the 
time as repairs necessitated by recent 
lire. The •'Maurctania" will re-enter 
the Cherbourg. Southampton, New 
York service January 14. 

Information from Rome sh 
that large numbers of American 
tourists have found themselves wOli 
out ocean transportation at the end 
..I' the journes in Europe, due to the 
chaotic navigation situation now ex- 
isting from Italian ports. The pas- 
of the United Slates immigra- 
tion law has caused wholesale sus- 

pensi ' heduled departures. In 

..m. case, the navigation companies 
withdrawn their entire fle< t 
from the New York service and 
diverted it to other trade. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 






With the Wits 



"Why do yon have knots on the 
ocean instead of miles?" 

"Well, you see. they couldn't have 
the ocean tied if there were no 
knots." 



"Wot's the good o' goin' back? 
We shall only have to strike again." 

"Well, 'ow the 'ell are yer goin' to 
strike again if yer don't go hack'" — 
London Mail. 



"My heart is with the ocean!" 
cried the poet rapturously. 

"You've gone me one better," said 
the sea-sick friend, as he took a 
firmer grip on the rail. — Tiger. 



Insurance Agent — But you surely 
agree to taking out an insurance 
policy to cover your hurial expenses? 

Wily Scot — Xa. na, mon; T might 
he lost at sea!— The Passing Show 
( London). 

"I'd like to take a Turkish bath 
but I haven't the price." 

'Don't spend your money. Just 
step into this phone booth and wait 
until Central gets your number. "- 
The American Legion Weekly. 



Lady — Aren't you ashamed to I 
You are so ragged that 1 am 
ashamed of you myself. 

Hobo — Yes. it is kind of a reflec- 
tion on the generosity of the neigh- 
borhood, mum. — The American Le- 
gion Weekly. 



"Yes, madam," said Harry the 
Hobo, "I know 1 look like a strong 
man, but out of my fifty years of 
life I've spent over sixteen years in 
bed." 

"Why, you poor man," replied the 
lady sympathetically, handing him a j 
shilling, "what has been the trouble 
— paralysis?" 

"No, ma'am," said Harry, "jest a 
reg'lar habit of sleeping eight hours 
a day, ma'am." 



Little Tommie Brown was always 
interested in his new baby sister. 
One day he stood peering down 
upon it while nurse was singing it to 
sleep. 

"Nurse," he whispered at last, 
"she's nearly unconscious, isn't she?" 

"Yes," nodded the nurse, and con- 
tinued singing the lullaby. 

Tommie whispered in alarm: "Then 
don't sing any more or you'll kill 
her." — F. veiling Xews (London). 



An American politician, who at 
one time served his country in a 
very high legislative place, passed 
away, and a number of newspaper 
men were collaborating on an obit- 
uray notice. 

"What shall we say of him?" asked 
one of the men. 

"< Mi, just put down that he was 
always faithful to his trust." 

"Yes," answered another of the 

group, "that's all right, but are you 

4 to give the name of the trust?" 



During an epidemic in a small 
Southern town every infected house 
was put under quarantine. After the 
disease had been checked an old 
negress protested vigorously 
the health officer started to take 
down tlic sign on her house. 

"Why. auntie," exclaimed the offi- 
cer, "why don't you want me t" 
take it down?" 

"Well, sali," she answered, "dey 
ain't be'n a bill collectah neah dis 
house sence dat sign went up. You 
all let it alone!" 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 

is under the direct and personal supervision 

of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 

willi .'ll modern appliances to illustrate and 

i any branch of Navigation. 

Tin ichers of Navigation in the 

past have been those having simply a 
of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
mi seamen demand a man as a 
r with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
iniin. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now. in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a i - i Member of the Bar. 

There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how I) aman may be, even in the rudiments of 

ii education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 

500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Hezzanlth's. Lord Kelvin's. Whyte, Thomson's Compasses, 
icles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sounding Machines. Sextants, 
Parallel Rulers. Pelorus, Dividers, Nautical Books, Charts 
and Tide Tables. Fully equipped department for the 
repair and adjustment of chronometers, watches and 
clocks. This work Is in charge of an expert of American 
and European experience. All work guaranteed. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 
Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



Seamen! Watch for Developments 

See Our Weekly Reports Posted in All Union Halls. 

1 have said that I would never be attorney for shipowners, until the 

seamen were shipowners. One of the purposes of my visit to Europe this 

summer is to acquire knowledge is to shipping conditions abroad and 

particularly to ascertain with what degree of success the seamen of 
Italy are operating ships. 

Any seamen, who. witli :: vli oming shipowners some time, are 

willing- to form "a Seamen's Society tor Savings" and will pledge to save 
fourth of their wages over their board and lodging per annum, said 
savings to be put in a de] that they themselves may select, please 

■ommunkate with the und 

Silas B. Axtell, 9 State St., New York City 




lames J?. Sorenseti 



SILVERWARE » CLOCKS 

for wedding presents. Large stock to select from. 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

715 Market St., between Third and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco 

All Watch and Jewelry Repairing Guaranteed 

Gifts that last by the thousand 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Established 1874 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want your Panama blocked 
right I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

762 VALENCIA ST., San Francisco 
Phone Park 9401 



OBftBlBTrJI 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ARGONAUT SH1B15 




^^g^^j^rrr^rT^T^, -!««■> wjttF 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXV, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1921. 



Whole No. 1770. 




WoipReirs Fai<c© §ftsnry&fti©ir& Tlbirouflglhi Famalfty Mog^lafrioim of Iimdunstipy 



Four million unemployed wage-earners averted 
acute distress during the winter of 1920-21 by 
drawing upon savings "to an unprecedented ex- 
tent" and by sacrificing their Liberty Bonds, but 
with their own resources now exhausted by the 
prolonged depression, with an army of 6,000,000 
out of work by September 1, and with rapidly 
increasing demands upon charity, there is urgent 
need in most industrial cities for the adoption, as 
soon as possible before winter sets in, of a com- 
prehensive program for combating unemploy- 
ment, including the creation of representative 
emergency community committees to co-ordinate 
all relief activities, to provide temporary jobs 
and to stimulate the expansion of public works. 

This conclusion is set forth in a report made 
public by the American Association for Labor 
Legislation, summarizing the findings of a sur- 
vey just completed, covering efforts to prevent 
and relieve existing unemployment in 115 im- 
portant industrial centers. 

The survey, in which chambers of commerce, 
labor unions, public officials and charity organi- 
zations co-operated, is supplemented with a 
special inquiry by Dr. John B. Andrews, Secre- 
tary of the association, who recently visited 
eighteen States and three Canadian provinces. 

"Everywhere," Dr. Andrews declares, "I found 
public officials, leading business men and bank- 
ers, labor officials and other representative citi- 
zens in agreement that the results of unem- 
ployment had assumed a serious aspect by late 
summer and were growing worse. Many are 
making definite preparations for community ac- 
tion to keep unemployment from getting out of 
bounds during the coming winter." 

Unemployment in the winter of 1920-21, ac- 
cording to the association's report, although 
twice as great in extent as during the previous 
depression of 1914-15, was accompanied by far 
less severe destitution and distress. 

"Six years ago the best estimates placed the 
number of unemployed at 2,000,000, while by 
June 1, 1921, high official estimates placed the 
jobless army at 4,000,000," the report asserts. 
"Yet permanent charitable and relief organiza- 
tions in sixty-one cities, with hardly an excep- 
tion, stated in positive terms that acute suffer- 
ing had been far less in 1920-21. The outstand- 
ing reason given was the unprecedented extent 
to which the unemployed tided themselves and 
their families over the first few months of idle- 
ness. 

Workers Efforts Are Pitiful 

"By using up their savings and selling their 
Liberty Bonds, and to a less extent disposing 



of automobiles, Victrolas, pianos and other valu- 
ables acquired during the war and post-war 
boom — even in many instances liquidating paid 
for or partly paid for homes — the unemployed 
on the whole carried themselves over last win- 
ter's emergency for periods ranging from three 
to nine months. 

"By early summer, according to similar testi- 
mony, these workers had reached the end of 
their resources and applications for charitable 
relief were beginning to assume 'grave propor- 
tions.' " 

Employers succeeded in preventing a large 
amount of additional unemployment by going on 
a part- time basis, according to the report, which 
estimates that if emergency plans for regulariza- 
tion had not been put into effect unemployment 
would have been at least doubled. 

"Business associations reporting from forty- 
one cities," it says, "were almost unanimous in 
stating that the short day and the short week 
were the devices most widely used by manufac- 
tures in their effort to avert as much unem- 
ployment as possible. Shifting and rotating em- 
ployes, though to a less extent, were also used. 
There was some making to stock, especially in 
basic industries, despite the uncertainty of price 
trends in raw materials and of the buyers' strike, 
and there were also a few attempts to utilize 
labor in making plant repairs or improvements." 

Public works were found to be effective for 
relief, serving as a sponge to absorb jobless 
workers. 

"Out of eighty-one cities furnishing informa- 
tion on this point, twenty-four had by June 1 
provided bond issues and appropriations total- 
ing nearly $10,000,000 expressly for the purpose 
of starting or pushing forward public works as 
an aid to the unemployed," the report shows. 
"This is significant in view of the many cities 
reporting a disposition to delay even their regu- 
larly planned public works pending cheaper 
transportation and construction costs. No city, 
however, had provided work enough to take 
care of all who applied — at least half, as a rule, 
being turned away." 

Cities generally had failed to make any efforts 
to reserve necessary improvements for bad sea- 
sons or bad years. Neither have they made 
any progress toward maintaining sinking funds 
to be used in starling emergency work when 
needed. 

Public employment bureaus and special com- 
munity committees were also important factors 
in relieving unemployment, the report finds. 

"( )ut of twenty-eight cities reporting," it 



states, "employers' associations in nineteen ex- 
pressed themselves as favorable to the public 
employment service, and only five were opposed. 
Many employers' bodies criticized the private 
fee-charging agencies for, as one expressed it, 
collecting exorbitant fees on mythical jobs." 

Community efforts had by June 1 to a marked 
extent taken the form of emergency commit- 
tees representing both public and private agen- 
cies, according to the report. 

"In no less than eighteen cities," it asserts, 
"special unemployment committees appointed by 
mayors — or similar public-private bodies — 
were created, including Oakland, San Francisco, 
Baltimore, Lawrence and Springfield, Mass., 
Knoxville, Salt Lake City, Seattle and Spokane. 
Activities of these groups ranged from stimulat- 
ing emergency public works and finding tem- 
porary jobs in private employment to co-ordi- 
nating the efforts of all existing relief agencies. 
In fourteen cities where organized work of 
emergency relief was confined to committees of 
private bodies or citizens, it was found that in 
most cases the committees were formed to bring 
about closer co-operation between existing relief 
agencies." 

Pauperizing Is Harmful 

Avoid bread-lines, soup kitchens, money gifts 
or other indiscriminate giving of charitable re- 
lief. That, according to the report, is the warn- 
ing coming from nearly all cities that had any 
experience with the demoralizing results of 
"pauperization." Especially vigorous condemna- 
tion of these methods came from twenty-four 
cities, including Pittsburgh, Toledo, Tacoma, 
Milwaukee, Denver, New Haven, Rockford, New 
Orleans, New Bedford, Springfield, Mass., New 
York City, Syracuse and Dayton. Undue pub- 
licity of relief plans or funds, it is stated, was 
especially condemned as harmful in reports from 
nine cities. 

Sixty-six cities contributed their conclusions as 
to the proper methods of relief and prevention 
of unemployment, summed up in the report as 
follows: 

"Of these cities, twenty-three laid stress upon 
expansion of public works as the most success- 
ful measure within their experience; sixteen 
emphasized temporary jobs and the giving of 
material relief, where necessary, only when 
earned; fifteen regarded proper community or- 
ganization, including mayors' committees as a 
prime necessity; fourteen were especially aided 
bj the efforts of employers to provide part- 
time employment by means of the short day, 
short week and the making to stock, and eight 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



secured notably good results through public 
employment bureaus. On the whole, reports in- 
dicate that many of the lessons of 1914-15 had 
been taken to heart." 

Many cities specifically reaffirmed the effec- 
tiveness of the "Standard Recommendations for 
the Relief and Prevention of Unemployment" 
issued by the American Association for Labor 
Legislation after a similar survey of unemploy- 
ment in 1915, declaring that where adapted to 
local conditions they have proved most suc- 
cessful. These recommendations include the 
appointment of representative city committees; 
education to avoid either an ostrich policy of 
refusing to face conditions or hysterical ex- 
aggeration of them; avoiding duplication of the 
work of existing organizations in providing 
emergency relief, as far as possible supplying 
aid by means of part-time employment; separate 
treatment of the unemployable and the unem- 
ployed; industrial training for unemployed work- 
ers; full utilization of public employment bu- 
reaus and their extension and improvement; 
definite suggestions as to method when address- 
ing general appeals to the public to "Do it now," 
"Hire a man." and the like; and urging employ- 
ers to make full use of part-time employment 
and to making to stock so as to make available 
work go as far as possible. 

Especial care has been found necessary in 
making the most of emergency public works to 
relieve the unemployed, the report states, along 
the lines of the following recommendation: 

"Start or push forward special public work, 
using private contributions in time of urgent 
need if public funds cannot be obtained. This 
should not be 'made' or unnecessary work, but 
needed public improvements in as great variety 
as possible, so as to furnish employment to 
other sorts of persons besides unskilled laborers. 
Give preference to resident heads of families if 
there is not work enough for all applicants. 
Employ for the usual hours and wages, but ro- 
tate employment by periods of not less than 
three days. Supervise the work carefully 
and insist upon reasonable standards of 
efficiency. To avoid the difficulties of 
emergency action make systematic plans 
for the regular concentration of public work 
in dull years and seasons by special provisions 
in the tax levy or by other appropriate method. 
Urge the repeal of laws restricting cities to con- 
tract work. Secure the aid of State and na- 
tional officials in stimulating local action. Steady 
the employment of the regular force, retaining 
employes on part time in preference to reducing 
their numbers." 

Cities must prepare for a hard winter ahead, 
according to the warnings coming from many 
sections, the report declares. 

"Not only have relief agencies pointed out that 
the unemployed have exhausted their own 
savings and valuables and cannot continue to 
help themselves as they did last winter," it as- 
serts, "but they also find that unemployment has 
been increasing faster than community activi- 
ties have been planned to combat it. Secretary 
Hoover has appealed to the States to help by 
letting contracts for road-building in the au- 
tumn, wherever practicable, instead of waiting 
until next spring. While an encouraging num- 
ber of cities, the reports show, have taken meas- 
ures to relieve the unemployed, still the great 
majority face the coming winter with no pro- 
gram at all or merely the feeble beginnings of 
constructive relief. The opinion is widely held 
that unless the industrial cities promptly 'dig 
in' unemployment in many sections will become 
unmanageable with the advent of cold weather." 



WHILE LABOR SLEEPS 
( By Eugene Lyons) 



What part lias the Department of Jus- 
tice played in the prosecution of Nicola 
Sacco and Bartolomeo Yanzetti, the two 
Italian labor organizers recently con- 
demned to die in the electric chair on a 
charge of murder? This question is again 
to the fore as a result of a vitriolic attack 
on the convicted men launched by depart- 
ment "investigators" and "probers" 
through newspapers in New York and 
Boston. 



Until now the Federal authorities have 
denied vehemently any interest in the 
Sacco-Vanzetti case. Their attack at a 
time when the men's lives hang in the 
balance and when it is necessary to keep 
the issues involved clear is interpreted by 
those interested in the defense of the two 
Italians as a "confession of complicity in 
the frame-up." 

Sacco and Yanzetti were arrested on 
.May 5. 1920, the very day after the sen- 
sational death of their friend. Andrea 
Salsedo, who was found dead on the side- 
walk under the fourteenth story window 
of the Department of Justice offices in 
New York. He had been held a prisoner, 
illegally, in those offices for eight weeks. 
Roberto Elia, who had also been imprisoned 
without warrant for a long period, was the 
only witness of the tragedy who might 
have testified as to the causes of Salsedo's 
death, and specifically whether or not he 
was pushed out of the window after being 
third degreed. Hut the authorities quicly 
removed the possibility of disclosures by 
deporting Elia. 

At the very time of their arrest, Sacco 
and Yanzetti were arranging a mass meet- 
ing of Italians to protest against the Sal- 
sedo tragedy. The draft of a leaflet call- 
ing the meeting was found on their per- 
sons. The two men assumed that they 
had been apprehended in connection with 
these activities. Not until later did they 
learn that they were charged with the 
South Braintree payroll murders. 

The friends of the two Italians have con- 
tended from the very beginning that the 
Department of Justice had a hand in the 
prosecution. Their theory was that the 
department wanted to be rid of these 
friends of Salsedo. who seemed determined 
to fix responsibility for his strange death 
while a prisoner. The method used in 
connection with Salsedo and Elia (namely, 
sudden arrest and imprisonment for a long 
time without trial or even indictment) was 
then in disrepute because of the shocking 
tragedy, they charged, and the department 
could not apply it to Sacco and Yanzetti. 
An arrest by the State, rather than the 
Federal authorities, no matter who in- 
spired it, was a stroke of luck for the 
Department of Justice. 

In the attacks published recently, those 
who issued the interviews for the depart- 
ment frankly link the name of Elia with 
those of Sacco and Yanzetti, thus lending 
color to the theory of the defense. By a 
series of unsubstantiated allegations 
against unknown and unnamed persons 
denominated as "Boston anarcists," the 
stories in the Xew York Daily Xews and 
the Boston Advertiser seek to leave the 
impression that Sacco and Yanzetti were 
in some mysterious fashion connected 
with every real and imagined outrage on 
the calendar, including such as occurred 
while they were in jail. 

No reasons for these damaging allega- 
tions are given except a casual reference 
to a "confession" by Elia. That confes- 
sion, if it exists, has never been made the 
basis of arrests. If it is of such a serious 
nature that it explains many atrocious 
crimes, then it is extremely strange that 
the authorities should have shipped its 
author to Italy instead of holding him for 
prosecution or as a witness against the 
guilty. Flia swore out an affidavit before 



his departure, in which he gives blood- 
curdling details of the treatment to which 
he and Salsedo were subjected. 

.Many persons in no wise connected with 
the defense and wholly out of sympathy 
with the social views of Sacco and Van- 
zetti have protested against these attacks. 
As the case will soon be brought before 
the higher courts, irresponsible accusations 
can only serve to create a hatccharged 
atmosphere in which a fair decision will 
be impossible. 



REPEAL POSTOFFICE GAG 



An active campaign to repeal the one 
remaining section of the espionage act 
under which a number of publications are 
now barred from the mails will be under- 
taken by the American Civil Liberties 
Union, as soon as Congress reconvenes. 
That section makes non-mailable any pub- 
lication which advocates "treason, insur- 
rection or forcible resistance to any law 
of the United States." Although Post- 
master General Hays has been liberal in 
his rulings, the law creates a censorship 
of political opinion and in practice inter- 
feres with expressions which do not come 
within the actual definition of prohibited 
language. The interpretation put upon a 
phrase in the old obscenity statute by the 
Court of Appeals of the District of Co- 
lumbia in the Xew York Call case shows 
how far the courts may stretch language 
which looks definite on its face. Senator 
William E. Borah, who sponsored the re- 
peal of the war laws, will probably take 
charge of the repeal of the section in the 
Senate. 

Under this section and a similar phrase 
in the old obscenity statute, one or more 
issues of forty-three radical publications 
wire barred by the Postofhce Department 
from March 4, when Postmaster General 
Burleson left office, up to August 1. Of 
these all but eight were foreign-language 
publications, of which three were pub- 
lished in foreign countries. Of the eight 
in English, three were Communist, two 
Socialist, one I. W. W., and one presum- 
ably anarchist. On the other hand, the 
Postoffice Department re-admitted to sec- 
ond class privileges up to August 26 eleven 
periodicals whose privilege had been taken 
away under Burleson. All but one of the 
periodicals still published, whose privi- 
leges were taken away by Burleson for 
their political views, have now regained 
second class status. That one is Solidar- 
ity, the official I. W. W. weekly. 

The elaborate machinery of censorship 
built up under Burleson has been disman- 
tled. The forces of translators in New 
York have been reduced, and all but one 
of the special assistants to the Solicitor at 
Washington have been let out. Under 
Solicitor Lamar a roomful of clerks 
wen- occupied as censors. Under So- 
licitor Edwards, since June 1, the work 
is done by him and an assistant, who, with 
Postmaster General Hays, give personal 
attention to all complaints of unfairness 
in barring publications. There is now no 
secrecy about the decisions of the depart- 
ment, the names of the publications nor 
the reasons for the action taken, as was 
the case under Burleson. The Postmaster 
General has publicly encouraged personal 
interviews with editors of radical papers 
who think they have been unfairly treated. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



DAUGHERTY WOULD CHAIN 
LABOR 

By Samuel Gompers 

United States Attorney General Daugh- 
erty, addressing the American Bar Asso- 
ciation, in which the lawyers are 100 per 
cent organized, said : 

"It is an undisputed fact that the public 
have a right to know what the quarrel is 
about in every actual or threatened strike 
or lockout and similar controversies." 

He said further that "there should be 
some definite agencies in government" for 
finding these facts and for making an 
"impartial finding" and went on to con- 
clude that "compulsory jurisdiction over 
these two factors to compel them to sub- 
mit to an inquiry of this sort is not only 
desirable but just." 

Mr. Daugherty apparently sought to 
forecast enactment of legislation for the 
United States patterned after the dis- 
credited Lemieux Act of Canada and the 
Industrial Disputes Act of Colorado. 

Mr. Daugherty suggests that at first the 
investigation should be compulsory and 
acceptance of the findings voluntary, be- 
cause he thinks our present study does 
not quite warrant compulsory awards. His 
intention is, however, that after further 
study and experience there should be 
binding awards. 

United States cabinet members do not 
go about the country offering their mere 
personal opinions. They are understood 
as voicing the viewpoint and policy of the 
Administration of which they are part. 

Attorney General Daugherty 's Bar Asso- 
ciation speech forecasts legislation in- 
tended to compel workers to submit their 
aspirations and their demands for justice 
to compulsory investigation and award. 
Compulsion always is followed by punish- 
ment for violation of the compulsory order. 

In principle compulsion is wrong. In 
practice it will not work. 

In principle compulsion is autocratic. In 
practice it will not be accepted by free 
people. 

Let the warning be sounded. This 
vicious proposal, so frequently exposed by 
the American Federation of Labor, so re- 
peatedly denounced by the great lovers 
of freedom, so consistently discredited in 
practice, again threatens our people. 

The men and women of labor must be 
on guard. 

Mr. Daugherty says that "the experience 
of the past shows that in most cases full, 
accurate, reliable publicity of the facts has 
been sufficient to compel an adjustment of 
these cases," meaning industrial disputes. 
Mr. Daugherty evidently thinks facts are 
absolute. Most facts are relative and not 
absolute. 

In addition to having committed himself 
to an undemocratic principle which is 
repugnant to the whole American concept 
of social organization and conduct, the 
Attorney General fails to find the truth in 
history. 

The "experience of the past" does not 
show that industrial adjustment has been 
brought about by full and reliable pub- 
licity. In the first place, it does not show 
that there has ever been full and reliable 
publicity in our great industrial disputes. 
In the second place it does not show that 
the forces of greed have cared much for 
the barbs of truth, even when those barbs 
have been accurately hurled. 

Even the United States Government, of 



which Mr. Daugherty is an important part, 
having in its possession full information 
about West Virginia, gathered by costly 
investigations, is unable to act with 
effectiveness. And it has not even seen 
fit to publish the facts brought out by 
the most recent investigation. 

Finally Mr. Daugherty wants laws 
"making such controversies impossible" 
when public sentiment shall have been 
sufficiently crystallized. 

Finally, then, what it all comes down to 
is compulsion for the workers, involuntary 
servitude, slave labor. 

Always the advocates of compulsion, the 
handmaidens of autocracy, the guardians 
of greed, come to that. They want it 
made impossible for workers to protest 
against injustice. They want it impossible 
for workers to withhold service under 
conditions which they find unjust and in- 
tolerable. 

But the American labor movement says 
to Mr. Daugherty and to all who come 
preaching compulsion, "We will not have 
it. We will maintain freedom at all costs. 
America must and will remain demo- 
cratic." 

Be on guard, be alert, be prepared to 
resist in every proper manner such en- 
croachments upon your freedom and your 
democracy. 

And always proclaim the great, funda- 
mental truth that voluntary agreement, as 
practiced in organized American industry, 
is the only means to industrial peace and 
progress and the only means by which 
American freedom can be maintained. 

The American way is to achieve willing- 
ly through co-operation as the result of 
agreement; not unwillingly in protest 
against autocratic edict and compulsion. 

Labor wants facts and has made a long 
and difficult fight for whatever legitimately 
will facilitate publicity for facts. In an- 
nouncing himse'f a recruit to this cause 
the Attorney General would have done 
better had he refused to ally himself with 
those who seek the perpetuation of indus- 
trial autocracy under the reactionary ban- 
ner of compulsion by legislation, because 
in supporting the second proposition he 
has made his support of the first propo- 
sition fruitless. 



CURRENT BRITISH SHIPPING 



A statement prepared in the European 
Division, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce, shows that an agregate of 
17,119 vessels in the foreign trade entered 
at British ports, with cargoes, in the first 
six months of the current year. Of this 
total, 9,917 vessels flew the British flag 
and 7,202 were of foreign register. The 
entries during the corresponding period of 
1913 were 23,754, of which 12,835 were 
British and 10,919 foreign. Clearances with 
cargoes from British ports during the 
first half of 1921 numbered 13,043—7,655 
of the vessels being British and 5,388 for- 
eign — as compared with 31,409 during 
January-June of 1913. Of this latter total, 
15,461 were British vessels and 15,948 were 
of other register. 

In terms of net tonnages, during the first 
six months of the current year, 17,357,989 
were entered at British ports and 13,716,- 
/84 tons cleared in the foreign trade. 
During the like period of 1913 the tonnage 
of the vessels entered amounted to 23,- 
133,126 and the clearances to 32,896,245 
tons. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 

International Seamen's Union of America will 

be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia — 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adeliade, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 14-16 Central Building, 41 
North John Street, Liverpool. 
BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 

Transportarbeiter Verband, Reichsabteilung 
Seeleute. Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, 
Germany. 

FRANCE 
General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan 7, 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 
Svenska Sjomar.s Unionen, 4 de Langgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbogade, 15 Copen- 
hagen. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Copenhagen. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, L. Strand- 
strade 20, Copenhagen. 

HOLLAND 

Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

ITALY 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Corso Principe Odone 2, Genoa, Italy. 
SPAIN 
Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle 
Inglaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Rcmadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedistinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



iii!iifiiii[iiiiiiiiii[|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iuiiinii!!iiir:r 

^■■imimwiiMiiiiiw ■iiwiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiMWHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimmninitni i 



mmnimniiiiinniiiimiiiiniminini 

The San Pedro Harbor Commis- 
sion has gone on I 

the bare-boat plan of the United 
States Shipping Board. Shipowners' 
propaganda receives a good impetus 
by the action. 

The disabled steamer Canadian Im- 
porter has been towed to Victoria, 
B. C. The crew was transferred to 
the Canadian Winner and taken to 
Vancouver. Settlement of claims 
against the vessel will be heard be- 
fore a British Columbia tribunal. 

The first effect of President Obre- 
gon's policy of refusing to permit 
vessels of foreign tonnage operating 
in the Mexican coastwise trade was 
shown at San Pedro with the tying 
up of the motor-ship Mazatlan. The 
California-Mexico Steamship Com- 
pany is the operator of the vessel. 
The ruling may cause a shift in the 
registry of the steamer. 

William Dimond & Co. have ac- 
quired the 11,000-ton Shipping Board 
steamer Greylock, built at Los An- 
geles. She is a sister ship to the 
West Farallon and the West Le- 
wark. She will be placed in the 
Oriental service for a trip or two 
and then will be operated to Europe 
from coast points. 

Practically every specie of jungle 
beast was represented in the float- 
ing menagerie which arrived at San 
Francisco from India aboard the 
Pacific Mail liner Wolverine State, 
consigned to Colonel Selig, Los An- 
geles. Storks, parrots, pigeons, mon- 
keys of various sizes and types, an 

i tment of leopards, tigers, bears i 
and other wild animals were included 
in the assortment. 

Four vessels are on the ways of . 
the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Com- 
pany. The steamer Narbo is on 
No. 5 drydock and the Union Oil 
Company's tanker Oleum is having 
a new high-pressure cylinder in- 
stalled. Repairs costing $40,000 are 
nearing completion on the freighter 
Katrina Luckenbach. A complete 
change of the vessel's oil-burning 
system is being installed. 

Eliminating thick-weather perils at 
Cape Flattery and in the greater 
part of the Straits of Juan de huca, 
the Navy Department's new radio 
compass station at Tatoosh is now | 
in full operation, ready to give all 
ships equipped with wireless their 
exact positions, thus reducing to a 
minimum the danger of such vessels 
running ashore on dark nights or in 
foggy and thick weather. 

More than 2,000,000 pounds of sal- 
mon were caught by tin- Novo off- 
shore fishing industry during tb 
son. The catch was below that of 
last year. Good catches were made 
in June, but in July the high winds 
practically stopped the fishing. In 
August the catch was light. Of the 
2,000,000 pounds 500 casks, weighing 
825 pounds each, were mild cured. 
1000 cases canned and the remainder 
shipped to San Francisco. 

Immigration authorities have taken 
action that will not allow Chinese 
shore liberty until a $500 bond is fur- 
nished for each member of the crew. 
This action has been contemplated 
for some time, and it was finally 
decided upon when seventeen Chi- 
stowaways were found on board 
the China Mail liner China. This 
is to curtail wholesale desertion of j 
Orientals from vessels who in the 
past have left the ships on presenta- 
tion of their seaman's certificate. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 

Prices 

Represented by 



at Third and Kearny 

All work done in 

our own sanitary 

workshop 

E. PEGUILLAN 



Established 
for 20 years 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 




MARINE ENGINEERING — NAVIGATION 

Wi- prepare you tor examination in four to six weeks — either course. 
Eighty dollars pays for individual instruction until you get your license. 

THE TECHNICAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

W. P. Pierson, Principal 
Phone Fillmore 9 7 0—2707 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Ahlstrom, Ellis 
Ahlstrom, Kllian F. 
Apinaitis, Antony 
Anderson, J. A. 
Amundsen. Ben 
Allen, I. J. 
Allen, William 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Bill 
Anderson, A. B. 
Allen, E. 
Bassin. George 
Baek, Christ 
Bachman, Peter 

W. 
Baker, Eddie 
Beals, Chas. M. 
Bjorseth, K. M. 
Bennett, Chas. C. 
Boria, Mike 
Breen, Thomas 
Bach, S. C. 
Bakke, Ellif J. 
Corrigan, Reul B. 
Cooper, Oswald 
Durett, Joseph E. 
noehring, Otto M. 
De Mon, Earl 
1 lanielson, Alben 
i HetB, A. 

Eriekson, Emanuel 
Erickson, Hans E. 
Elite, I. W. S. 
Emmerz, Josef 
Engler, Samuel 
Klze. Carl 
Fielding, P. 
Forsberg, Swen L. 
Framnes, A. 
Fugrnan, Arthur 
Foster, Clarence 
Francis, William S. 
Golden, Roy L. 
Gilkison, A. F. 
Gray, John 
Gluck, Karl 
Gorman, Peter A. 
Gallery, Russell B. 
Glaser, Jean 
Green, Joe 
Harris, Thomas 
Hall, Robert E. 
Halvorsen, Hans 
Hopperman, H. 
Holman, Martin 
Hanson, William 
Harris, John T. 
Huber, Charles L. 
Hanson, O. 
Howell, E. W. 
Hanson, Carl 
Holman, Martin 
Hofstad, Lester 
Henriksen, George 
Hines, Leo 
Hill, Charles 
Holmes, M. 
Heino, Gust. 



Inguealsen. Arthur 
Jensen, Emanuel 
Johansen, Stefan 
Jensen, Chris 

-2278 
Johnson, E. 
Johnsen, Ben 
Jensen, E. Churs 
Joyce, Dan 
Koster, Walter 
Klaver, R. 
Karlsson, August 
Kopperman, H. 
Kluek. Karl 
Kaaveland, Thos. 
Kennedy, Bart 
Kelly, D. J. 
Kiepper, T. 
Korliz, Jack 
Kraus, Jack 
Larson, Chris 
Lundgren, Gust 
Law, H. C. 
Lackey, Chas. H. 

M. 
Lambers, G. B. 
Leskinen, John 
Lewis, H. S. 
Lent, Frank 
Langerud, Henry 
McDonald, James 
Miller, Winford 
Mack, George W. 
Martin, Charles 
Mallkoft, Peter 
Meyer, Robert 
Morey, Art J. 
Mikkelsen, Harry 
Muldrose, W. L. 
Markim, Bernard 
Mackway, George 
McGregor 
Neuman, Alex 
Neuman, John C. 
Norberg, John E. 
Norgaard, Henry 
Norman, A. 
Nelson, Peter 
Nilsen, Christ 
Olson, John 
Olsen, Michael 
Olson, Tom 
Osterlund, A. J. 
Peppert, Fred C. 
Peterson, Carl A. 
Petersen, William 
Pettersen, John 
Paterson, George 
Petersen, Knut 
Pursi, Ernest 
Paystl, Anskelm 
Preston, E. 
Pope, Bert 
Pehle, Frank L. 
Rhodts, Russel C. 
Redondo, Manuel 
Rever, John T. 
Rosenau, J. 
Robertson, E. J. 



Rengsdorf, W. 
Sibley, Milton 
Sadllng, Axell 
Spatig, Harvey S. 
Sauer, O. K. 
Samuelsen, Slgvart 
Sanderson 
Skaar. Jakol 
Skubber, Hans 
Skaar, O. W. 
Swansson, N. O. 
Smith, Carl J. 
Sitts. Bud 
Sin. 'lair, P. 
Sterner, Charles 
Slade, I. S. 
Sanders, George 
Svansson. Ernest 
Toomey, Paul 
Thompson, Guy 
Thornquist, Adolf 
Tuhkanen, John J. 
Tolman, W. E. 
Torwick, H. 
Taylor, Bert 
TiiiKstrom, A. R. 
Taylor, J. G. 
Veits, Clayton L. 



Weber, Fred C. 
Westley. W. E. 
Walter , E. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Witravamen, Geo. 
Warnick, A. D. 
Walters, Fred L. 
Wohn, Otje 
Wolff, Herbert 
Wood. E. E. 
White, William 
Wertanen, Frans 
Willey. Edward 
York, Chas. E. 
REGISTERED 
LETTERS 
Peterson, Carl 
Behmar, Joe 
Delgado, Nazario 
Worgaard, H. 
PACKAGES 
Adams, H. C. 
Heaps, James 
La Born, Roy 
Okasski, Welling- 
ton 
Searthland, Gunnar 
Williams. Edward 



INFORMATION WANTED 

Fred Klein, who left New Orleans 
on the S. S. "Lake Ferona" in 
March, 1920, is inquired for by his 
father, L. Klein. Address, care the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion, 543 Bienville Street, New 
Orleans. La. Charles Thoresen, 
Agent. 



OLD KENTUCKY TOBACCO 

S jrear old leaf. Ripe. Rich. Nature 
Cured. "The Kind That Made Ken- 
tucky Famous." Chewing or smok- 
ing. :: lbs. 11.00 postpaid. 

KENTUCKY TOBACCO ASSN. 
W 452, HawesvMIe, Ky. 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. Q. Swanson is not connected 
With any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront. Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 



— or — 



A SQUARE MEAL 
EUREKA~CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sti., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Mrs. John M. Eshleman, 601 Un- 
derwood Building, San Francisco, is 
anxious to ascertain the whereabouts 
of Louis I'.artels. a native of Fin- 
land, age 45 years, hair and com- 
plexion light, medium built. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts will 
please communicate. 9-14-21 



Gust. I.arriman, formerly of the 
schooner "Perry Setzcr," please com- 
municate with T. L. Bailey, 15 Wil- 
liam street, New York, N. Y. 

You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
in the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship it is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Foilette is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 

where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other man in public life. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year — Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine. Madison. Wit. 



SINGLE ROOMS 
$1.50, $1.75, 12.00, $2.50 a Week 

BROOKLYN HOTEL 

369 First Street Phone Douglas 60-1 

SINGLE HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 

$2.75 to $3.00 Per Week 

DOUBLE HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 

$5.50 Per Week 



Anyone knowing how Eugene Mc- 
Nulty, coalpasser, met his death re- 
cently at Boat Harbor, Newport 
News, Va., while employed on S. S. 
"Co'quit," will confer a favor on his 
mother, Mrs. Frances McNulty, 511 
Hemlock street, Scranton, Pa., or 
Silas B. Axtell, 9 State street, New 
York City, by communicating with 
either one. 



THE 

JAMES H. BARRY CO. 

The Star "Press 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

We print "The Seamen's Journal" 



ALBERT MICHELSON, Attor- 
ney-at-law; attorney for Marine 
Firemen & Watertenders' Union; 
Admiralty law a specialty. 676 Mills 
Bldg., Telephone Douglas 1058. Resi- 
dence Phone Prospect 2908. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of William Peterson, born in Nor- 
way, last heard of in Bayonne, N. J., 
when he quit the S. S. "Gulfland" on 
November 11. 1918; is requested to 
communicate with Joseph A. Moran. 
43 Ship street, or John Ward. 489 
Eddy street. Providence, R. I. 

4-27-21 



To Scandinavian Sailors: 

Inheritances collected. Money 
forwarded to all places in Sweden, 
Norway, and Denmark to banks 
or private persons at lowest rates. 
Full guarantee 

LEONARD GEORGES, 

General Passenger Agent Swedish- 
American Line. 268 Market St 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




!ll!llll!llillllllillilil!ilill!illllill!lil;l!!« :;■.,.. : . 






Letter 



fiillIIIIIIIII!IIIII!IIIIR« 

"What's in a Name?" 

Certain employers are pushing cam- 
paigns to forbid workers having a voice 
in fixing the conditions under which they 
shall work. 

These employers assert that they alone 
have the right of naming the terms of 
work, the wages and the hours of labor 
of the persons whom they employ. Thus 
the workers, through the economic power 
of these employers, are forebidden from 
making use of the natural, the human 
right of free association with other work- 
ers for mutual, economic and social benefit. 

These employers seek to hide their real 
design to break clown American standards 
of living by naming their scheme to do it 
"the American plan." 

In furthering the purposes of this auto- 
cratic and falsely named plan these em- 
ployers have caused workmen who refused 
to be bound to be locked out of shops 
and have enlisted the aid of the Courts by 
suing out writs of injunction against the 
workers forbidding them from doing acts 
which they have a lawful right to do. 

This so-called 'American plan" attacks 
the principles of American liberty by deny- 
ing to workers the right of free associa- 
tion. Its plain purpose is to shatter wages 
and to increase the hours of labor and 
thus break up the homes of the workers, 
taking the children from the schools and 
putting them to work in the factories. 

This so-called "American plan" cuts 
deep when it assaults the home-life of the 
American worker, which is the guarantee 
of national security and the fount of social 
progress. 

By whose authority do the organizers of 
this plan use the name American? Upon 
whose authority do they claim a place for 
it on American soil? America, in its very 
nature is opposed to everything for which 
this plan is sponsor — low wages and long 
hours — which mean child labor, ignorance, 
misery, poverty, squallor and hovel-homes. 
All the Court injunctions on earth cannot 
make these black things white, cannot 
make them just, cannot make them Amer- 
ican. 

America has declared to all the world 
that the labor of a human being is not a 
commodity or article of commerce. This 
means that workers are human with the 
rights of humans. 

America stands for justice and equal 
rights to all mankind. 

America, above everything else, stands 
for human liberty. 

The so-called "American plan," if put 
into use, would strangle justice, would 
destroy equal rights, would smother hu- 
man liberty. 



,... .... 



Lumber Trust's Profits 

The company union of the lumber trust 
is a fine institution — for the lumber trust. 
But despite the wily tricks (if the com- 
pany union, and regardless of the efforts 
of the trust to drive out of the lumber 
industry every member of the Interna- 
tional Union of Timber Workers, the 
spirit of those workers to stand by the 
principles of legitimate organized labor is 
stronger than ever. What the company 



union has done for the lumber workers is 
precisely what it has done for other work- 
ers wherever they have been coerced in- 
to it. 

The purpose of the company union in 
the lumber industry is to exploit the 
workers, not to benefit them. That's why 
the company gets back of its union ; that's 
why the word "loyal" is chucked into the 
name. "Loyalty" is now used to cover 
every shady scheme devised by wily press 
agents. The workers, however, are not 
fooled by the use of words. Deeds count 
with them. The "loyalty" of the lumber 
trust to the Government during the war 
is well illustrated by a statement of its 
profits made by an authority on the 
question. 

"Spruce," says this authority, "which 
sold before the war at from $10 to $15 
per M, was sold to the Government for 
the fabulous price of from $200 to $250 
per M, a 'loyal' profit of 2,000 per cent. 
All grades of lumber were likewise placed 
in the 'loyal' class of profits, and these 
great profits arc now being used to crush 
the workers in the industry through the 
'loyal' company union and to restrain trade 
to the further advantage of the operators 
'loyal' to their own interests. 

"These lumbermen, who control 80 per 
cent of the standing timber in the United 
States, have used this control to manipu- 
late the log market, setting a fabulous 
price on logs, which they charge up to 
themselves as cost of raw material, mak- 
ing the cost of producing lumber ready 
for use tremendous. The buying public 
must pay this enormous stumpage price or 
go without lumber, for the small operator, 
who usually owns no timber of his own, 
must buy his raw material in the open 
market. 

"There is no other industry in America 
today that men can regard with more 
justifiable scorn than that of the 'loyal' 
lords of the great, clean woods." 



Coerce Employers by Credit Control 
A delegate from the butchers' local to 
the Central Labor Council of Los Angeles, 
California, reported at a recent meeting of 
the council that a committee from the 
butchers' organization had signed a wage 
contract with the master butchers of the 
bay district. When the Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Bankers' Association of 
California heard of the agreement they 
are said to have informed the master 
butchers that their bank credit would be 
stopped unless the agreement with the 
workers was repudiated. 

This incident illustrates the concept of 
"freedom of contract" which is loudly pro- 
claimed by the editorial mouthpieces of big 
business and the blatant Chautauqua lec- 
turers of the alleged "American" plan. 



Union Theater Employes Win Big 
Victory 

The anti-union shop in the theaters of 
the country has been kicked out of the 
(Continued on Page 11.) 

S. 'I'. Hogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer, Seamen's 
cases a specialty. Sixth floor, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1880.— Adv. 



I International Seamen's Union 
©f America 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1% Lewis Street 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 67-69 Front Street 

BALTIMORE, Md C. RASMUSSEN, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

13 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La CHARLES THORSEN Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex SAM HALL, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex L. LARSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHARLES MARTELL, Agent 

369 South Main Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga H. COOK, Agent 

27 Houston Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEON W. MENDEL, Agent 

707 Palafox Street 

TAMPA, Fla C. F. BIGELOW, Agent 

205 Polk Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C ERNEST H. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowline- Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. a. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BALTIMORE, Md H. MEYERS, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK NOLAN, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK Agent 

413% Twenty-first Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga A. BOGE, Agent 

21 West Bay Street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

812 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON. Tex J. KOMISKIE, Agent 

2306 Post Office Street, Ave. E. 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAN LYONS, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. McCABE, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I JTARRY RIDLEY, Agent 

296 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me McDONALD, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga GEO. McMURDO, Agent 

523 East Bay Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C R. McLAUGHLIN, Agent 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary 
Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES J. FAGAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 
H. ESKIN, Secretary 

HOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
NEW HAVEN, Conn _.- U% Collis Stro»t 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



iiniiiiiiiiiiiiii! 

Published Weekly at San Francisco 
by THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 

J. VANCE THOMPSON Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN' ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.50 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office. Martime Hall Bldg., 

5S Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francrsco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of 
October 3. 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
genera] interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the. 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1921. 

CURRENT EVENTS 

The army of unemployed in this country 
grown into alarming proportions, ap- 
proximating A ,000 .000, with strong pros- 
pects of it reaching the 10,000,000 mark 
before the winter is over, and the first 
intimation that our "Palm Beach" adminis- 
tration was in any way aware of the situa- 
tion was not given until it became 
menacing. 

( )ne of the most degrading scenes ob- 
served by our people since slavery days 
was witnessed last week on P>oston 
Common. 

Jobless men were placed on the auction 
block, stripped to the waist, after the 
custom of old slave auctions. They de- 
clared their willingness to work while 
standing before thousands, offering their 
services to the highest bidder. 

Tragedy was added to degradation when 
a youthful ex-service lad — crushed under 
the weight of misery and starvation — col- 
lapsed on the auction block while being 
offered for sale. As the sobs welled into 
the lad's throat, the auctioneer exclaimed: 

"When in the history of the republic 
have you ever witnessed such a scene as 
this — which demonstrates the great sorrow 
of hearts that are broken?" 

The press has endeavored to take the 
poison from the situation with the sug- 
gestive innuendo that the affair resulted 
from a publicity stunt, but the tragedy of 
the boy who served his country in the 
interest of Democracy remains an accus- 
ing fact. 

-;- -.* -,- 

< >f more satisfaction for press exploita- 
tion is the latest society news concerning 
Americans in Europe. They are well rep- 
resented at all flu- sporting centers and 
watering places of France; while in "Gay 
Paree" Bacchanalian orgies and uncivilized 
revels are rampant. Millions of francs 
are wagered daily at the races and gamb- 
ling hells are thriving as never before in 
history. Society women desiring to keep 
pace with fashion's demands have ten 
changes of raiment for each day, while 
dog and monkey parties, with every con- 



ceivable form of entertainment, is fur- 
nished for the amusement of the idle rich. 
Never before in the world's history have 
the plutes indulged in such display of 

reckless extravagance. 

Just four short years ago. under the 
urge of a nation's call, our men and boys 
set out for France, while consciousless 
profiteers took full advantage of every 
opportunity presented for predatory activi- 
ties. Our boys have returned and today 
they walk the streets, as do other work- 
ers, in vain quest for work and bread. 

The plutes set out for France, where 
fortunes are dissipated in riotous living, 
unconcerned about the 6,000,000 vainly 
seeking work in America. 



STEERING REQUIRES PRACTICE 



In seamanship, as well as in other pro- 
fessions, it requires training before effi- 
ciency is attained. Since the advent of 
steam and motor propulsion, the high 
standard of skill, formerly necessary to 
sailing ships, has slowly deteriorated, but 
there an- still certain duties in which every 
sailor should be proficient. One of the 
most important of these is steering. 

A quartermaster, or helmsman, should 
know more than the necessity of just turn- 
ing the wheel or steering a straight 
course; he must know how to make a true 
course, especially when sailing coastwise 
or running close to land. 

There are times when currents have a 
tendency to set in, or off shore, and when 
the vessel falls off her course she always 
swings the same way so that she makes 
a false course inshore or offshore as the 
case may be. Careless helmsmen fre- 
quently permit a vessel to hang before 
bringing back to the point; therefore if the 
set is inshore the vessel makes an inshore 
course. This is particularly dangerous 
when hugging the beach, especially when 
the weather is not clear. 

Experienced seamen, as a rule, when 
they find that the vessel has a tendency to 
hang inshore, will endeavor to counteract 
the inshore set and make a true course by 
regulation offshore at times. 

The officer on watch can not always 
know to a certainty whether the vessel 
is making a true course, but the helmsman 
does, and besides, there are few officers 
who take delight in nagging the man at 
the wheel now-a-days. 

The recent lockout furnished all kinds of 
possibilities for disaster, inasmuch as 
everything was favorable. Inexperienced 
men were given duties to perform with 
which they were unacquainted and could 
not In- efficient, due to lack of training. 
Discipline was at a very low ebb, due to 
the fact that the strikebreakers were pet- 
ted wards of the operating companies, and 
not inclined to take kindly to correction. 
Therefore, it is not surprising that when 
the setting was complete a disaster could 
occur. A vessel manned by inexperienced 
seamen, perhaps an inshore set, the wea- 
ther misty and the ship permitted to make 
too much of an inshore course. Then, in- 
stead of safely outside the reef, a crash 
and serious loss of life. 



N( >RMALCY BY FORCE 



Carelessness might injure your fellow- 
worker aboard ship; take pains with your 
work; don't rush. 



When big moneyed interests decided to 
bring the industrial world back to nor- 
malcy by brute force, they started some- 
thing that is now felt throughout the com- 
mercial world: the impression of their 
handiwork is too complete. Depression, 
stagnation, unemployment and misery pre- 
vails on every hand, while millions of 
jobless and penniless men and women are 
mute testimony to the faulty regulation of 
industry by those whom we have permit- 
ted to control. 

\\ hile the hearts of our people are 
breaking, the mercenaries of Wall Street 
continue to fiddle. 

The early period of depression was 
tided over by the workers sacrificing their 
treasured belongings, and now that they 
have reached the end of their resources 
they are confronted with misery and star- 
vation. 

A powerful influence on the situation 
is the fact that most of the money avail- 
able has been gathered into one center : 
and to a great extent has placed out of 
circulation by investment in tax exempt 
securities drawing high rates of interest. 
The plutes see no reason for business or 
effort when coupon clipping is so easy. 

Our legislators must be aware of this 
situation, but to date no consideration has 
been given to this matter except to sug- 
gest still further exemptions for "big 
business" and the saddling of greater 
taxes upon the people. 



DIVIDENDS FOR WORKERS 



On the last dividend-paying day, ten 
thousand working people passed through 
the central office of the Leeds (England) 
Industrial to-operative Society to receive 
their patronage dividends on purchases 
made from the Society during the past 
year. Of these. 7.700 drew their divi- 
dends, and the other 2,300 reinvested them 
in the busim 

The Leeds Society was organized by 
common working people of this English 
manufacturing city, and its achievements 
are an inspiration for co-operators in this 
country. Its membership now comprises 
nearly 100.000 people, and the scope of its 
operations is indicated by the fact that it 
possesses more than one hundred grocery 
stores, eighty-odd butcher shops, and 
numerous dry goods stores, shoe stores, 
coal yards and fish and vegetable stores 
throughout the city. The Society also 
own- nearly one hundred factories for the 
manufacture of the products it sells, in- 
cluding boots and shoes, furniture, brushes, 
musical instruments, flour, harness and 
leather goods, bread, cake and crackers. 
hams, bacon and lard, shirts, hosiery and 
clothing, and other staple articles. The 
sales of the Society exceed $20,000,000 a 
year, and the dividend paid members has 
for some years ranged from 20 per cent 
to 22J/S per cent. In addition to this 
ample financial dividend, the profits are 
used in part to maintain libraries, reading 
rooms, meeting halls, restaurants and 
country recreation homes for the benefit of 
the members and employes: while more 
than $30,000 a year is spent on educational 
work to spread co-operative ideals. 

The population of the City of Leeds is 
435,000. There are fourteen American 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



cities with a greater population. Suppose 
that the working people in these fourteen 
cities were to receive back 20 per cent of 
their annual food and clothing bills from 
the retail stores where they spend their 
wages ! A 20 per cent saving in living 
expenses equals an increase in wages of 
just that amount. If English workers can 
do this, can not American workers do it, 
too? 



TO PROBE I. M. M. CONTRACT 



According to recent press notices, hear- 
ings are to be conducted by the United 
States Shipping Board in New York Octo- 
ber 4 and 5 to determine whether the con- 
tract with the International Mercantile 
Marine Company has with the British 
Government is of such a character as to 
prejudice the chartering of American ships 
by the company. 

P. A. S. Franklin, president of the 
steamship company, appeared before the 
board recently and submitted the new 
contract between the company and the 
British Government, which apparently ex- 
empts ships under American registry from 
its provisions. 

The new contract made in June of this 
year does not mention the clause con- 
tained in the original agreement, which 
bound the International Mercantile Ma- 
rine not to "impede nor impair the Brit- 
ish trade nor the success of the British 
merchant marine," but it specifically ex- 
cludes "any and all vessels documented 
under the laws of the United States," 
from the provisions of the previous princi- 
pal agreements. 

The charge which had been made in 
Congress and upon which the board acted 
was that under the contract existing be- 
tween the British Government and the 
International Mercantile Marine, every 
vessel which the company controlled was 
subject to regulations of the British Board 
of Trade in such a way that American 
shipping could be used to thwart the 
growth of the American Merchant Marine 
while under charter to the International 
Mercantile Company. 

The board, as the first step, adopted a 
resolution last March requesting the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine to change the 
agreement with the British Government 
so that it could not be applied to any 
American ships operated by the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine under the 
American flag. 



QUEENSLAND RAILWAYS 



Editor Seamen's Journal : 

The following verses were submitted to 
me as encouragement in our struggle by a 
red-blooded young American girl, whose 
vision reaches farther than the usual com- 
monplace. I trust it will be possible to 
publish them in the Journal, and perhaps 
one or more comrades will receive the 
same consolation therefrom as myself. 

H. COOK, Savannah, Ga. 



STAND BY 

You men who struggle for human right 
In the battle that seems to be done; 

Stand by! This struggle is only the first, 
There is victory yet to be won. 

You seafaring men are an alien race, 

No landsman calls you his kin; 
There's never a brother to give you aid, 

But you must fight on and win. 

You have weathered through years of darkness; 

Your forebears were slaves of the sea; 
There arc those who wish it to come again, 

But you know it never must be. 

There are wretches who feed on the Nation, 
Who for profits would sacrifice men; 

The day when your star is ascending, 
Give them measure for measure again. 

Your cause is a good and a just one, 
Though none seem to offer a hand; 

Your efforts, they said, was a danger 
To Law and Order command. 

Your places were filled in by others — 

Unthinking incompetents all. 
How great their loss nobody k:.ows, 

Hut you know their gain was small. 

So marshal your forces in silence, 
Let the will of Justice be done; 

1 1 is not a storm on the deep to fight. 
Rut a battle with men must come. 

You clear-eyed sons of Neptune, 

Go to your mother, the sea; 
She has written for ages forgotten, 

She can show you how to be free. 

At present there's darkness around you 
And the rocks of defeat loom up dread; 
Stand by! You cannot quit the fight, 
There is glorious freedom ahead. 

An American Girl. 



Queensland has the greatest railway 
system in the Australian Commonwealth, 
the Government lines open for traffic to 
Gate totaling about six thousand miles. 
In addition to these there are 440 miles 
of railways owned by public bodies, open 
for public traffic also. The railways under 
construction include two very extensive 
schemes — The Great Western Railway and 
the Great Northern Coast Line. The ex- 
tensions will be connected by a trunk 
line running northwest from Eromanga 
to Camooweal, on the border of the 
Northern Territory, and will open up 
large areas of land splendidly adapted for 
sheep and cattle raising. 



Demand the Union Label. 



Heber Blankenhorn found the West Vir- 
ginia miners talking about John Brown 
and Harper's Ferry in a mood that did 
not indicate any quick or easy conclusion 
to their struggle. 

lie writes in The Nation for September 
14 that the "trouble" in West Virginia is 
of long standing and national significance. 
It is the West Virginia fighting tradition 
that is giving a different aspect to an 
economic problem of world-wide extent. 
The article continues: 

"It might be more sensible in dealing 
with West Virginia to begin by facing 
three facts. First, the present phase of 
civil war has lasted since 1919, its main 
features unchanged, with no attempt to 
change them hitherto by the Federal Gov- 
ernment. An outbreak was bound to 
come. Second, the outbreak was a rising 
of a considerable section of the people, not 
a mob of toughs. Estimates of the 'army' 
ran from 10,000 to 14,000. Perhaps two or 
three times that number of people actively 
abetted or openly approved the march. 
Third, these people took the law into their 
own hands because they believe that that 
is precisely what 'the other side' has been 
doing for a long time." 

In the same issue of The Nation ap- 
pears an editorial entitled "Is It Un- 
American to lie Fair?" showing that since 
the Mexican Government is fair to or- 
ganized labor, the organized Open Shop 
employers have officially and in effect de- 
clared that principle un-American. 



FF1CIAL 



ii 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 6, 1921. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Andrew Furuseth presiding. 
Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 12, 1921 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Andrew Furuseth presiding. Voted for 
delegates to the Twenty-second Annual Conven- 
tion of the California State Federation of Labor. 
R. INGWARDSEN, 
Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg.. 59 Clav Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 6, 1921. 
Shipping and prospects dull. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 6, 1921. 
Shipping fair. 

A. KLEMMSEN, Agent. 
2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 6, 1921. 
Shipping fair. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 6, 1921. 

Shipping in steam schooners fair. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 6, 1921. 
Shipping dull. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 6, 1921. 
Shipping good. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, August 29, 1921. 
Shipping picking up. 

WILLIAM HARDY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



The attention of seamen and fishermen 
is respectfully directed to our advertisers. 
It has always paid to advertise in the 
Journal, and in spite of the fact that the 
purchasing power of seamen was recently 
somewhat restricted we are at all times in 
a position to patronize those who seek our 
trade and good will. While looking for 
the union label, remember our advertisers. 

RUSSIANS BARTER VALUES 



Somewhat at variance with press propa- 
ganda, which has already declared a re- 
version to capitalism by the Soviet gov- 
ernment, a late commerce report states 
that according to current news from So- 
viet Russia, the Council of the Peoples' 
Commissariat has established arbitrary ex- 
change values for certain commodities, 
with one pood (36 pounds) of rye grain 
taken as the basis. It its stated that this 
move has been made necessary by the 
reintroduction of freedom in private trade. 

From these arbitrary commodity ex- 
change values as established in June it 
appears that one pood of rye grain is fixed 
as the equivalent of 12 poods of salt, 25 
poods of petroleum, 12 packages of 
matches, 4 metal pails, 4 iron spades, or f) 
arshins (1 arshin equals 28 inches) of 
calico. 

It is stated that a central office for the 
registration and fixing of market prices 
will be established by the Central Organ- 
ization of Co-operative Societies — the cen- 
trosoyus — which will keep the public in- 
formed of market conditions and changes 
in prices. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OFFICERS ANSWER OPERATORS 



At the present time the American merchant 
marine is staggering through uncertain channels 
and those who are concerned for its welfare 
have reason to keep a sharp lookout for break- 
ers ahead. 

It is natural that men who have spent the 
greater part of their lives in following the call- 
ing, and by dint of sacrifice and perseverance 
have climbed to the higher rung of the ladder, 
will be imbued with most jealous regard for our 
success as a maritime nation. 

The reckless and destructive policy pursued by 
American vessel operators is rapidly driving our 
flag from the waters; therefore when a display 
of ignorant sarcasm is added to injury it be- 
comes necessary to meet the requirements of 
the occasion. 

In accordance with pressing need, those offi- 
cers interested in the American merchant ser- 
vice, and who realize the general situation, have 
addressed the following to the members of 
their association: 

San Francisco.Cal., August 30, 1921. 
To Members of the Masters, Mates and 
Pilots of the Pacific: 
Dear Sirs and Comrades: 

The Masters, Mates and Pilots of the 
Pacific, in launching this pamphlet request 
that you read the same very carefully, and 
after such reading, to concentrate your 
thoughts as to your future welfare, and the 
accomplishments of the association in your 
behalf without resorting to strikes. The 
late unpleasantness which caused the lock- 
out was not your fault, nor was it the as- 
sociation's — the fault resting entirely upon 
the shoulders of the shipowners and Ship- 
ping Board. The first wage scale formu- 
lated by the shipowners called for a reduc- 
tion in your monthly pay of 25 per cent, 
and the elimination of all overtime pay- 
ment for extra service. Then the Shipping 
Board and shipowners formulated another 
wage scale which called for a reduction in 
your monthly pay of 15 per cent, and re- 
quiring you to do duty when in port and 
on the date of arrival (and in violation 
of law), for twelve, twenty-four or thirty- 
six consecutive hours as the case may be 
without extra compensation for such extra 
service. The association communicated 
with the Shipping Hoard on the 26th day 
of March, asking for a conference. The 
answer to the request was received in the 
form of a wage scale on April 30, with a 
reduction of 15 per cent to become effec- 
tive May 1, 1921. The association was not 
even given the opportunity to point out to 
the Shipping Board and shipowners that 
the rules as proposed by them, if enforced, 
would be in violation of law. 

1"he association believes in the obedience 
of all laws. If we believed otherwise, we 
would consider ourselves unworthy of citi- 
zenship. When you are required in viola- 
tion of law to be on duty when in port, 
or on the date of arrival to exceed nine 
hours out of any twenty-four, just stop 
and think the matter over, especially when 
some one tells you that they will look out 
lor your interest and never mind the asso- 
ciation. The association has at all times 
insisted that its members perform their 
duties faithfully, and give a fair day's work 
for a fair day's pay, and at no time has the 
association formulated any unreasonable 
rules. 

The association will insist upon their 
rights as citizens to petition Congress or 
any other legislative body if found neces- 
sary to enact laws for the protection of 
seafarers, or the protection of the Amer- 



ican Merchant Marine. It is to the inter- 
est of the association and every citizen 
that we have a merchant marine second to 
none, but in order to do that we must have 
some honest-to-"God" shipping men who 
will not turn a ship back 1600 miles, which 
cost the Government $12,000, so that the 
operator would be to the good some $200. 

The shipowners object to you having an 
association which works for your interest. 
Your association does not object to the 
shipowners having an association which 
works for their interest. The only differ- 
ence between the two associations is that 
the Masters. Mates and Pilots of the Pa- 
cific believe in the Constitution of the 
United States and its laws, and that equal 
rights shall be granted to all may they be 
rich or poor. 

Through the efforts of the Masters, 
Mates and Pilots of the Pacific the amend- 
ment to Section 4463 of the Revised Stat- 
utes was passed and approved March 3, 
1913, in order to prevent the unreasonable 
shipowner from compelling mates to do 
duty while vessels are in port to exceed 
nine hours of any twenty-four, including 
the date of arrival, and also regulating 
their watches at sea. The general custom 
being prior to the passage of the Act to 
compel mates to do duty in port from 
twelve to thirty-six hours without extra 
compensation. If you want the law re- 
pealed or its provisions not enforced, then 
neglect your duty to the association. If 
you want the provisions enforced and not 
repealed, then do your duty to the asso- 
ciation. It's up to you, take your choice. 

The following U. S. Revised Statute, 
Section 4463, regulates the hours that ship- 
owners can require you to be on duty 
while at sea or in port: 

United States Revised Statute, Section 4463 

"Sec. 4463. Xo vessel of the United States 
subject to the provisions of this title or to the 
inspection laws of the United States shall he 
navigated unless she shall have in her service 
and on board such complement of licensed offi- 
cers and crew, including certificated lifeboat 
men, separately stated, as may, in the judgment 
of the local inspectors who inspect the vessel, 
be necessary for her safe navigation. The local 
inspectors shall make in the certificate of in- 
spection of the vessel an entry of such comple- 
ment of officers and crew, including certificated 
lifeboat men, separately stated, which may be 
changed from time to time by endorsement on 
such certificate by local inspectors by reason of 
change of conditions or employment. Such en- 
try or endorsement shall be subject to a right 
of appeal, under regulations to be made by the 
Secretary of Commerce, to the Supervising In- 
spector and from him to the Supervising In- 
spector General, who shall have the power to 
revise, set aside, or affirm the said determination 
of the local inspectors. 

"If any such vessel is deprived of the services 
of any number of the crew, including certificated 
lifeboat men, separately stated, without the con- 
sent, fault, or collusion of the master, owner, 
or any person interested in the vessel, the vessel 
may proceed on her voyage if, in the judgment 
of the master, she is sufficiently manned for 
such voyage; Provided, that the master shall 
ship, if obtainable, a number equal to the num- 
ber of those whose services he has been de- 
prived of by desertion or casualty, who must be 
of the same grade or of a higher rating with 
those whose place they fill. If the master shall 
fail to explain in writing the cause of such de- 
ficiency in the crew, including certificated life- 
boat men. separately stated, to the local in- 
spectors within twelve hours of the time of the 
arrival of the vessel at her destination, he shall 
be liable to a penalty of $50. If the vessel shall 
not be manned as provided in this Act, the 
owner shall be liable to a penalty of $100, or in 



case of an insufficient number of licensed officers 
to a penalty of $500." 

"Sec. 2. That the board of local inspectors 
shall make an entry in the certificate of inspec- 
tion of every ocean and coastwise seagoing mer- 
chant vessel of the United States propelled by 
machinery, and every ocean-going vessel carry- 
ing passengers, the minimum number of licensed 
deck officers required for her safe navigation 
according to the following scale: 

"That no such vessel shall be navigated unless 
she shall have on board and in her service one 
duly licensed master. 

"That every such vessel of one thousand gross 
tons and over, propelled by machinery, shall 
have in her service and on board three licensed 
mates, who shall stand in three watches while 
such vessel is being navigated, unless such vessel 
is engaged in a run of less than four hundred 
miles from the port of departure to the port of 
final destination, then such vessel shall have two 
licensed mates; and every vessel of two hundred 
gross tons and less than one thousand gross 
twenty-four hours, then such vessel shall have 
two licensed mates. 

"That every such vessel of one hundred gross 
tons and under two hundred gross tons, pro- 
pelled by machinery, shall have on board and 
in her service one licensed mate, but if such 
vessel is engaged in a trade in which the time 
required to make the passage from the port of 
departure to the port of destination exceeds 
twenty-four hours, then such vessel have two 
licensed mates. 

"That nothing in this section shall be so con- 
strued as to prevent local inspectors from in- 
creasing the number of licensed officers on any 
vessel subject to the inspection laws of the 
United States, if, in their judgment, such vessel 
is not sufficiently manned for her safe naviga- 
tion; Provided, that this section shall not apply 
to fishing or whaling vessels, yachts, or motor 
boats as defined in the Act of June 9, 1910, 
or to wrecking vessels." 

"Sec. 3. That it shall be unlawful for the 
master, owner, agent, or other person having 
authority to permit an officer of any vessel to 
take charge of the deck watch of the vessel upon 
leaving or immediately after leaving port, unless 
such officer shall have had at least six hours off 
duty within the twelve hours immediately pre- 
ceding the time of sailing, and no licensed officer 
on any ocean or coastwise vessel shall be re- 
quired to do duty to exceed nine hours of any 
twenty-four while in port, including the date of 
arrival, or more than twelve hours of any 
twenty-four at sea, except in a case of emerg- 
ency when life or property is endangered. Any 
violation of this section shall subject the person 
or person guilty ot a penalty of $100." 

Licensed men are requested to read the 
following very carefully, and govern them- 
selves accordingly: 

"While vessels are in port, including the date 
of arrival, as provided by law, no licensed deck 
or engineer officer shall be required to do duty 
on board ship during the day. or night, ex- 
clusive of meal hours, to exceed nine hours of 
any twenty-four, nor shall such deck or engi- 
neer officers be required to do duty during the 
day and then be required to stay aboard ship 
at night, subject to call in cases of emergency; 
Provided, such night, or day duty, or any com- 
bined day and night duty exceed nine hours of 
any twenty-four, including the date of arrival, 
the person in authority requiring licensed officers 
to do duty to exceed such nine hours of any 
twenty-four, shall be liable to a penalty of $100 
for each violation." 

For further information and guidance in 
reference to the interpretation of Subsec- 
tion 3 of Section 4463 of the Revised Stat- 
utes, the Solicitor of the Department of 
Commerce handed down the following 
opinion on the Sth day of May, 1916: 

"This subsection (meaning Section 3) pro- 
hibits requiring any licensed officers on any 
ocean or coastwise vessel to do duty to exceed 
nine hours out of any twenty-four hours while 
in port. Of course there is no question as to 
the engineers being licensed officers and there- 
fore coming within the prohibition. In my 
opinion the question presented depends entirely 
upon whether or not the engineers were on 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



board in compliance with the orders of the 
owners or masters, required to remain and sub- 
ject to call at any moment during the time. If 
the former, and during the time they were on 
board were not permitted to leave the vessel 
and were subject to call — that is, if services 
could be required of them — they were on duty 
within the meaning of subsection. That no ser- 
vices actually were required does not alter the 
situation; the fact that they could have been 
required is controlling (U. S. vs. Chicago M. & 
P. S. Ry. Co., 195 Fed. 783-785; U. S. vs. Den- 
ver & R. G. R. R. Co., 197 Fed. 629-631). It 
follows that if this required duty extended be- 
yond a period of nine hours in twenty-four, 
except in case of emergency, when life or prop- 
erty was in danger, it constituted a violation 
of the subsection. On the other hand, if the 
engineers were voluntarily on board, preferring 
to sleep there rather than some place in the 
city, were not subject to call to duty while so 
on board, and no service could be required of 
them, then the provisions of the subsection were 
not, therefore, violated, and this, irrespective of 
the length of time they so remain on board.'' 

As provided by law, no contract or 
agreement is legal or binding on any sea- 
man which deprives him of bis rights un- 
der the law ; therefore, should the master, 
owner, agent, or other person having au- 
thority, require any licensed deck or engi- 
neer officer to do duty in violation of sub- 
section 3 of Section 4463, Revised Statutes, 
with the understanding that such licensed 
deck or engineer officers must accept time 
off for services which they have been re- 
quired to do in violation of law, it will in 
no manner release such master, agent, or 
other person in authority from the penalty 
as provided in Subsection 3. Licensed men 
should report violations of law to the Col- 
lector of Customs, United States local in- 
spectors, and their respective organizations 
for enforcement of same. 

As provided in the Act, approved March 
4, 1915: 

"While vessel is in a safe harbor no seaman 
shall be required to do any unnecessary work- 
on Sundays, or the following named days: New 
Year's Day, the Fourth of July, Labor Day, 
Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day, but this 
shall not prevent the dispatch of a vessel on 
regular schedule or when ready to proceed on 
her voyage." 

Every person employed on board ship is 
a seaman, other than the master; there- 
fore the preceding provisions are applicable 
to licensed officers. 

Masters should pay strict attention to 
the following: 

"If any vessel subject to the inspection laws 
of the United States is deprived of the services 
of any number of her crew, which includes 
licensed officers as provided for in her certifi- 
cate of inspection, through desertion or casualty, 
without the consent, fault, or collusion of the 
master, owner, or any person interested in the 
vessel, the vessel may proceed on her voyage 
if, in the judgment of the master, she is suffi- 
ciently manned for such voyage; Provided, the 
master has first done all in his power to fill such 
vacancy caused by said desertion or casualty, 
and not otherwise. The vessel must first have 
had on board and in service such complement of 
licensed officers and crew as provided for in her 
certificate of inspection. If an officer or any 
member of the crew is discharged, such dis- 
charge cannot be construed as desertion or 
casualty. Masters should never discharge li- 
censed officers during the voyage. If the li- 
censed officers fail to perform their duties for 
which they were licensed, masters should file 
charges against such licensed officers so failing 
with the U. S. local inspectors. In case there 
is a shortage in the number of the crew, or 
licensed officers, the master must explain to 
the local inspectors in writing the cause of 
such deficiency within twelve hours of the time 
of arrival or he is liable to a penalty of $50. 
If the vessel is not manned as provided by 
Section 4463 R. S., the owner shall be liable to 



a penalty of $100, or in case of an insufficient 
number of licensed officers to a penalty of $500." 

Facts — Not Fiction 

The members of the Masters, Mates and 
Pilots of the Pacific are all citizens of the 
L T nited States, and believe in, and do up- 
bold the Constitution, and willingly obey 
all laws as laid down by the Congress of 
the United States, and all State, county or 
city laws where they may reside or be. 
Secondly: Allegiance to themselves and 
dependents, for the average employers 
don't care whether their employes have the 
necessities of life or not. Thirdly : To be 
honest and reasonable towards all man- 
kind, faithful in the performance of their 
duties on board ship, giving a fair day's 
work for a fair day's pay. The cardinal 
principles of the Masters, Mates and Pilots 
of the Pacific being of such a high stand- 
ard of loyalty and good citizenship that it 
would be folly to expect the shipowners to 
acquiesce. 

In the good book it says that no man 
can serve two masters — meaning, of course, 
"God" as the master, not man. Hence we 
believe the writings in "God's" book 
should be considered sacred and to be used 
only for the purpose for which they were 
intended, and not to further selfish inter- 
ests of man, as it appears in the pamphlet 
issued over the names of the Pacific Ameri- 
can Steamship Association and Shipown- 
ers' Association of the Pacific Coast. 

In the same pamphlet we note the fol- 
lowing: "Insofar as the associations of 
seafarers are used to secure the passage of 
laws, we have nothing to say, because such 
activity is within the right of any Ameri- 
can citizen." Is it possible that the pre- 
ceding' sentence as quoted was not com- 
pleted as intended by having omitted the 
following: "but if they do participate in 
such activities they will be destroyed." 
Too Many Bosses 

The following also appears in the 
pamphlet: "Anybody knows that nothing 
will ruin discipline as quickly or as com- 
pletely as having too many bosses — even 
soup can be ruined if too many cooks un- 
dertake to make it." We wish to state 
that we quite agree with the shipowners 
on that point — that there are too many 
bosses, and no only do they destroy dis- 
cipline but the unnecessary bosses eat up 
most of the profits. In order to remedy 
such conditions of having too many bosses 
we would advise that the master be per- 
mitted to be the real master and not be 
the man that only navigates the shin up 
and down the coast or from port to port. 
Profits Versus Safety of Life 

Should profits be considered before 
safetv of life? The shipowner says yes. 
The Masters, Mates and Pilots of the Pa- 
cific say no. And for proof of same it will 
be found in the hearings on the Jones 
Shipping Act. pages 454, 456 and 1550. 

On page 454 of the hearings we find 
that the shipowners' representative made 
the following statement to the Committee 
on Commerce of the Senate, in reference to 
fusible plugs being required in boilers: 

"We are required to have fusible plugs 
in our boilers, a minimum of two plugs in 
each boiler, to be renewed annually. There 
is always danger of the plugs melting." 

On page 456 we find the same gentle 
man protesting as follows against the pres- 
ent inspection rules requiring the placing 
of dynamo above the deepload line: 



"Present inspection rules require the 
placing of the dynamo above the deepload 
line. This ruling should be abrogated, as 
the flooding of the ship would cut off the 
steam to run the dynamo anyway. 

"Of course all the dynamos were down 
in the engine room. When this law came 
out Ave either had to buy additional dyna- 
mos for boats to sit above the deepload 
line or incur the expense of changing the 
old ones. The result is that most of our 
boats have two dynamos. The idea is to 
keep the dynamo running when the ship 
fills with water. When the ship fills with 
water and your fires are out, how are you 
going to run your dynamos? It is an 
absurd proposition." 

On page 1550 we find the representative 
of the Masters, Mates and Pilots of the 
Pacific pleading before the Committee in 
the interest of safety, which reads as fol- 
lows : 

"Mr. Chairman: In some of the state- 
ments made to the Committee, of which 
I have made a careful and honest analysis, 
I find that some want to buy ships, so 
they say, but in reality they don't want 
to buy, but on account of being over- 
burdened with patriotism they are willing 
to sacrifice their own personal interest in 
order to keep the American flag on the 
seas — provided they are made a present 
of the ships. Provided further that if 
various laws and the rules and regulations 
of the Steamboat Inspection Service are 
repealed or set aside to conform with 
their views, such as discontinuing the use 
of fusible plugs in boilers, as there is 
always danger of the plugs melting should 
the water in the boilers get below the 
danger point ; deck pumps to be discon- 
tinued, for they might be of some use in 
case of fire in the engine room, and the 
engineers being unable to remain at their 
stations; discontinue the placing of 
dynamo above the water line, for it might 
assist in sending out a message for help 
or keep the lights burning for a few 
minutes if found necessary to abandon 
ship at night, with fires out on account of 
the flooding of the engine room in case of 
an accident, but with plenty of steam 
pressure on the boilers to run the dynamo ; 
discontinue the practice of double boatage 
for cargo ships, for the crew's lives on the 
American Fisheries' steamer 'Firwood' 
were saved on account of having double 
boatage when she burned to the water's 
edge ; last but not least the repeal of the 
Seamen's Law, in order that they may 
have a surplus of fabricated officers and 
seamen which would further extend their 
limitations of liabilities, and assist them, 
as they think, in destroying the unions; 
and then, Mr. Chairman, under such con- 
ditions they would be willing to go forth 
and do their duty as patriotic citizens, and 
forget about their personal interests." 

\\ as the S. S. "Alaska" manned as pro- 
vided by law? If not, why not? Would 
there have been as many lives saved by 
her incompetent or competent crew, as 
the case may be, provided no lights were 
burning when the signal was given to 
abandon ship on account of the dynamo 
being in the flooded engine room, but 
plenty of steam pressure on the boilers to 
run the dynamo? Fortunately, by the 
pleadings of the representative of the 
Masters, Mates and Pilots of the Pacific, 
(Continued on page 11) 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WASHINGTON LETTER 

( By Laurence Todd) 



West Virginia has had the spotlight 

for the past two weeks and labor is par- 
ticularly interested in West Virginia. 
Very few of the newspapers have told the 
true story of the "march of Mingo." Pri- 
marily, it was a revolt against "govern- 
ment by gunmen." The miners of West 
Virginia — and they wen- accompanied by 
railroad workers, farmers, merchants, pro- 
onal men and even preachers — had 
reached the limit of their endurance. 
They could no longer stand the murders. 
depredations, terrorism and lawlessness 
that was perpetrated by the armed thugs 
who constituted the private armies of the 
West Virginia coal operators. The State of 
officials were controlled by the same in- 
Courts were suhservient to their 
will and in some cases were suspended 
under "martial law" proclamations put out 
by the servile Governor. It was protest 
against these conditions that caused the 
inarch on Mingo. Thirty-six miners were 
held in the Mingo county jail on various 
trumped-up charges, and from past ex- 
periences their friends and neighbors felt 
they would he "railroaded." They re- 
solved to he on hand when the Court met 
e justice done and so general was 
the resentment that the whole population 
joined the protest. 

The mine owners met the "invasion" 
with a veritable standing- army of gun- 
men, strikebreakers, State constabulary 
and deputies. An armed collision seemed 
imminent, when cooler heads averted 
trouble. Keeney and Mooney, president 
and secretary of the local branch of the 
United Mine Workers of America, suc- 
ceeded in getting the angry men to dis- 
perse. 

Then wdiat happened? Immediately, 
the State constabulary invaded the little 
town of Sharpies in the middle of the 
night and without any provocation what- 
ever killed two men and wounded two 
more. That was the last straw. The 
whole countryside responded in a fresh 
march on Mingo to wipe out these thugs 
and gunmen, and there would have keen 
a stern retribution had not the Federal 
troops intervened. 

Abuses of Long Standing 

Back of these dramatic episodes are the 
long-standing abuses of an industrial 
feudalism. The mine owners of West 
Virginia are autocrats. They look upon 
the workers as chattels. They resist 
unionism and they defy the edicts of the 
State and Federal Governments. It is 
they who have set up "government by 
gunmen" and seek to perpetuate an irre- 
sible oligarchy of wealth in free 
America. 

There has been trouble in the West 
Virginia mining districts for twenty years, 
and the Paint Creek "massacre" is still 
fresh in the memories of many old mine 
organizers. The recant outbreak had its 
inception when the coal operators of West 
Virginia refused to carry out the award 
of the I*. S. Bituminous Coal Commission. 
The miners worked during the war with- 
out an increase and the operators agreed 
to abide by the commission's findings. 
The West Virginia fields were organized 
and the owners simply ignored the award. 
There were also complaints about lack of 



weighing, and the company stores charged 
outrageous prices. 

The miners complained ami their com- 
mittees were fired. Finally, in despera- 
tion, they called in the United Mine 
Workers to organize the fields. That 
started the trouble. The operators dis- 
charged union men as fast as they were 
discovered. Men were evicted from their 
houses as soon as they were discharged. 
These evictions were carried out with 
great brutality. Soon whole colonies were 
living in tents. 

Then came the "Rattle of Matewan," 
where several of the Baldwin-Feltz gun- 
men were killed by Sid Hatfield and an 
outraged citizenry after they had shot 
down the Mayor. That aroused the mine 
owners, and the violence of their gunmen 
increased. "Martial Law" was declared 
by the State and constitutional guarantees 
were suspended. Then Hatfield and Cham- 
bers were assassinated, many of the lead- 
ing union men were arrested on "framed" 
charges, and the inarch on Mingo began. 
Governor Reopens Wounds 

Tlie union officials wanted the Federal 
ps. Fhilip Murray, national vice- 
lent of tin- Mine Workers' Union, 
joined in the call. So did William Pctrie. 
vice-president of the district local. They 
knew the miners would need protection 
from the soldiers if they did go home and 
lay down their arms. When the soldiers 
finally came the miners and their friends 
quietly dispersed. 

Xow. Governor Morgan, a tool of the 
mine owners, seems to he doing his best 
to start trouble again by promising the 
prosecution of all union officials who had 
anything to do with "inciting this armed 
treason and insurrection against the 
State." He forgets that Brigadier-General 
Bandholtz of the Federal Army said the 
State constabulary were responsible for 
the resumption of the march on Mingo. 
Lie forgets that it was the surrender of the 
State Government to private gunmen that 
compelled the miners to arm in their own 
defense. He only remembers that the 
mine owners want unionism "crushed" 
and now that a bloody fight has been 
averted by a narrow margin he seems de- 
termined to start a fresh uprising by 
wholesale "frame-ups" against the leading 
union officials. 

Keeney and Mooney have already been 
indicted on charges of "constructive mur- 
der." It is alleged that they "incited the 
men to riot" and that a killing afterwards 
resulted. Other officials, undoubtedly, will 
be prosecuted on charges equally flimsy 
and a new attempt will be made to use 
the controlled Courts of West Virginia 
to "railroad" the men guilt} of organizing 
the slaves of the great mine own 

Labor leaders here are certain this will 
cause renewed bitterness and that there 
can be no permanent peace in West Vir- 
ginia until government by gunmen is 
overthrown and the miners are allowed 
the protection of union organizations. The 
federal Government will be asked to take 
a hand in this struggle and some startling 
facts about the lawlessness and corruption 
of the West Virginia State government 
will be brought out at the Senate in- 
vestigation which will resume at Mingo 
on September 19. 

Gompers Tells Plain Facts 

Politicians here are wondering whether 



Samuel Gompers has openly declared war 
on Harding's administration. In his Bal- 
timore Labor Da eech he minced no 
words and said that not a single bill, so 
far as he knew, had been introduced in the 
present Congress for the benefit of the 
working class, and not a single thing had 
done to protect the workers in their 
constitutional rights. 

Mr. Gompers declared that the commer- 
cial interests are trying to set up an indus- 
trial oligarchy and he especially arraigned 
the United States Chamber of Commerce. 
lie also assailed the open shop movement 
and charged the Harding administration 
with responsibility for the widespread un- 
employment. 

It is well known, of course, that Mr. 
Gompers opposed Harding before the elec- 
tion. Since then the president of the A. 
F. of L. has not had much to say on 
national politics. His Baltimore remarks 
were decidedly vitriolic and may indicate 
that he thinks labor has nothing to expect 
from the Harding administration and be- 
lieves the time has come for a more 
aggressive stand. 

Industrial Conference Camouflage 

It is now very apparent that the Presi- 
dent's "industrial conference" was called 
for no other purpose than to recommend 
the half-billion dollar loan to the railroad. 
Several Cabinet officers have said that 
this would do more to remedy unemploy- 
ment than anything else, and there is evi- 
dence which indicates that the whole 
scheme originated in the fertile mind of 
Herbert Hoover. The conference will urge 
the railroad loan to "bring employment 
back to normal," and this will give the 
Senate an excuse for passing the bill. 



HOW THE IDLE RICH LIVE 



"They live, in the main, upon the por- 
tions of the national product which arc 
called rent and interest, by the legal guar- 
antee to them of the fruits of the labor 
and abstinence of others, transmitted to 
them without any merit or exertion of 
their own." — Political Economy. 



New Zealand owns and operates its 
own railroad system, hence the railroads 

are run for service to the people. 



USE YOUR HEAD 



A woodpecker pecks 

( )ut a great many specks 

Of sawdust 

When building a hut. 

He works like a nigger 

To make the hole bigger — 
He's sore if 

His cutter won't cut. 

lie doesn't bother with plans 
Of cheap artisans. 

But there's one thing 
Can rightly be said : 

The whole excavation 

Has this explanation — 

1 le builds it 

By 

Using 
His 

Head. 

— American Flint. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



CREW NEEDS AID 






The cadets on the steamer "Mononga- 
hela," which has been lying in port at 
Manila, P. I., since last March, are ex- 
periencing a real taste of life on the ocean 
wave, and there is every possibility that 
when they do eventually return, they will 
all join heartily in the refrain "No more 
will I go roving," etc. A second appeal 
has been dispatched to Chairman A. D. 
Lasker of the Shipping Board to aid these 
stranded seafarers. All of the youths are 
Californians and many of them reside in 
San Francisco. 

Mayor Frank Otis of Alameda recently 
sent an urgent message to Chairman Las- 
ker. A letter received here depicts the 
sorry condition of those on board. The 
letter said that the men and boys com- 
posing the crew were in a deplorable state 
and that the latter were likely to go in- 
sane due to their long enforced predica- 
ment. 

Those on board the "Monongahela" are 
penniless and have been since last June, 
when no further money was forthcoming. 
Lack of clothes has forced all of the crew 
to remain on the ship for many months. 

The "Monongahela," purchased by Vic- 
tor S. Fox of New York from the Ship- 
ping Board, sailed from Manila December 
3 last for San Francisco. Last March the 
vessel showed up at Manila short of pro- 
visions and her crew reporting a three 
months' battle with storms to keep the 
craft afloat. They had been unable to 
clear out of the China sea on account of 
adverse weather conditions. 

Efforts are being made to bring the 
crew home on the transport "Thomas," but 
unless aid is given them they will be 
forced to remain there. 

Whether or not the Shipping Board 
will stand the cost of transportation has 
not been announced. They sold the vessel 
to Victor S. Fox, according to eastern 
advices, but the latter has been unable to 
meet payments due on the "Mononga- 
hela." 

The "Monongahela" is commanded by 
Captain Frank Swain, and at the time she 
sailed from Manila last December was 
loaded with sugar for delivery here for 
the account of the Pacific Steamship Com- 
pany. 

The vessel has been absent from this 
port for more than a year. Those on 
board have received no wages since June. 



THE CALLOUS SHIPOWNERS 



The Australian Worker says: "Some of 
the shipping concerns are protesting 
against a number of the provisions in the 
new Navigation Act, on the ground that 
they will entail costly structural altera- 
tions which experience has shown to be 
unnecessary. Well, many things are not 
necessary, among them being the sizes 
of some of the profits made by the rapa- 
cious skin Hint shipping companies. But, 
apart from that aspect of the matter, 
decent conditions, and reasonable precau- 
tions against danger, may not be deemed 
wholly necessary, but they are advisable. 
And among the first to subscribe to this 
doctrine, where their own personal safety 
and welfare are involved, would be the 
shipping profiteers themselves. 



Attend your Union meetings. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 5) 



stage doors and the union workers have 
walked back to their old jobs. The man- 
agers got tired of the anti-union shop 
principle even before they attempted to 
put it into effect as a workable proposi- 
tion. The settlement entered into between 
the International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employes, the American Federation 
of Musicians and the Producing Managers' 
Association guarantees the union shop and 
collective bargaining for another year in 
those branches of the theatrical profession. 
The settlement for the burlesque theaters 
puts about ten more theaters under the 
banner of the union shop and gains for the 
workers an increase in wages. 



Food Cost's Increase 
From July 15 to August 15 there was 
an increase in the retail cost of food 
in 14 principal cities of the United States, 
according to the Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics of the United States Department of 
Labor. In Philadelphia food prices ad- 
vanced 6 per cent; in Bridgeport, Conn., 
Chicago, New Haven, Conn., Providence, 
R. I., and Washington the rise was 5 per 
cent. Kansas City marked up 4 per cent, 
while in St. Louis, Springfield, 111., and 
Birmingham, Ala., the people gave over 
the counter 3 per cent more for their eat- 
ables. Peoria, 111., shows a 2 per cent 
levy on the family purse. Salt Lake City, 
Denver and Little Rock show an increase 

of 1 per cent. 

Organizing Silk Workers 
An organizing campaign among silk 
workers has been begun by the United Tex- 
tile Workers of America. The movement is 
being carried on by men and women 
trained in the textile industry and ex- 
perienced in organizing work. The need 
of the workers in the silk textile industry 
for the support of organized labor guaran- 
tees the success of the efforts that will 
be put forth to help them. 



OFFICERS ANSWER OPERATORS 

(Continued from Page 9.) 

and the stand taken by the Steamboat In- 
spection Service in the interest of safety 
no change was made in the rules in refer- 
ence to discontinuing placing dynamos 
above the deepload line. Hence all deck 
lights on the "Alaska" were burning 
brightly within four or five minutes before 
she went down. We will leave the sur- 
vivors of that terrible wreck to answer the 
questions, and the unfortunates who lost 
their lives to bear silent witness as to the 
competency or incompetency of the crew. 
MASTERS, MATES AND PILOTS 
OF THE PACIFIC, 



That rats desert a sinking ship is pro- 
verbial. But it now appears that they 
berth in lifeboats, as if in preparation for 
sinking. Of one hundred rats destroyed 
by fumigation on a steamship arriving at 
San Francisco, says the U. S. Public 
Health Service, eighty-nine were killed in 
the four lifeboats. 



The last annual statement shows that 
the Government owned railroads of New 
Zealand made a net profit of more than 
$8,000,000 last year on less than $200,000,- 
000 invested. The roads earned more 
than $9,000 a mile. 



|IIIIII1IIIII!IIII!I!IIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIII ' Ilium! 

| International Seamen's Union | 

ilium . 

LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAK 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark 

K. B. NOLAN, Secretary 
THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 
Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN, 

1501 Columbus Road 

MILWAUKEE, Wis CHAS. BRADHERING, 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich WM. DONNELLY. 

410 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON, 

74 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

CONNEAUT, O 

992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio S. R. DYE, 

618 Front Street 

60UTH CHICAGO, 111 

3308 East Ninety-second Street 

SUPERIOR, Wis WM. EDGEWORTH, 

724 Tower Avenue 



ES 

Street 

Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 71 Main Street 

THOS. CONWAY. Secretary 

ED. HICKS. Treasurer 

Phone Seneca 48 

CLEVELAND, 819 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 410 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 35 West Eagle Street 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 
Telephone Seneca 896 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Cay Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 571 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN. Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box «T 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 1016 First Avenue, South 

P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore Room 21, Alnsworth Building 

SAN PEDRO. Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 86 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 68 Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 13» 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca Street 

PRINCE RUPERT ' 1 I. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA, Ore :..P. O. Box 138 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 
^i'OCKTON, Cal Labor Temple 



FISH TRAP PILE DRIVERS AND WEB WORKERS 
OF PUGET SOUND AND ALASKA 

i ;i . Doch Street. Belllngham, Washington 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



::: 



Coopers employed in the breweries 
of Los Angeles have received an in- 
crease in wages in the new contract 
signed by the brewery owners and 
the representatives of the Coopers' 
Union. 

Wages of 60,000 trades workers 
in Chicago were cut from 10 to 40 
cents an hour in a decision handed 
down la>t week by Judge K. M. 
Landis, arbiter. Forty trades were 
affected by the decision. 

The Willys-Morrow Company, 
which manufactures parts for the 
Willys - Overland automobiles, has 
issued a call for 2000 former em- 
ployes to return to work. The plant 
has been closed for several weeks. 

The unemployment situation in 
Xew York has already reach) 
menacing stage. It is increasing to 
such extent that it threatens to as- 
sume proportions next winter that 
have never confronted this country 
before. 

Settlement favorable to the union 
ended the strike of the journeymen 
butchers at San Francisco against 
seven wholesale jobbing firms. The 
union recently agreed to accept wage 
reduction of 50 cents a day. 

Beginning with October 1. union 
carpenters of Xcwark, Montekiir, 
Bloomfield and Orange will get an 
increase in wages of $1 a day, rais- 
ing their wages from $8 to $9. The 
new scale will continue to April 1, 
1922. 

Union electrotypers and stereo- 
typers of Albany, X. V.. have won 
the forty-four-hour week, after a 
strike lasting live weeks. The re- 
duction in hours has been effected 
with the former rate of pay for the 
forty-cight-hour week. 

The Mineral and Soda Water Bot- 
tlers' Union at San Francisco has 
been unable to get a renewal of a 
working agreement which expired 
September 1. Three firms have signed 
up, but several of the largest firms 
have refused to consider another 
year under the same terms exist- 
ing last year. 

Governor Len Small has ordered 
a military investigation of conditions 
in Hardin county, following a con- 
ference with a delegation of miners 
from the troubled Fluorspar country 
of southern Illinois, who made 
charges of persecution and abuse by 
Hardin county authorities, mine offi- 
cials and alleged hired gunmen, and 
asked the investigation. 

The United Garment Workers of 
America have scored a victory in 
the settlement of the strike at the 
Alschuler Manufacturing Company's 
plant in Racine, Wis. The manage- 
ment four months ago declared its 
intuition to run a non-union shop. 
Four months of that sort of labor 
seems to have been more than suffi- 
cient to convince the management 
of the fallacy of the "siren call" of 
the union busters and their press 
agents. 

Building trades unions of San 
Francisco whose charters have been 
revoked by their international unions 
because of their affiliation with the 
"rank and file" movement, plan to 
institute proceedings in the courts 
to save their charters and to pro- 
tect their investments in the Build- 
ing Trades Temple, Carpenters' Hall 
and Pile Drivers' Hall. The or- 
ganizations contemplating legal ac- 
tion are Carpenters' Union No. 22, 
Pile Drivers' Union Xo. 34, Carpen- 
ters' Union Xo. 483 and Carpenters' 
Union No. 1082. 



Office Phone Main 2866 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLOC, FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule mini. ted by the Seattle 
Postofnce, letters addressed in rare of 
the Sailors' I'nion Agency at Seattle can 
held longer than 30 days from 
of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail for v. 
.luring- that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 
Abrahamsen, Kaer- Augusta, J. 

Ian Andersen. Hans 

Ackerstrom. Oscar Akselsen. George 
Aberg. Elnar Andersen, Marius 

Anderson, A. C. Anderson. Ingemar 

Anderson, Cornelius Adrian. P. 
Antonsen. John Andersen, P. E. B. 

Aholalnen. Edvord Alonso, Nicolas 
Andersen, Arthur H. Andersen, Pete 



Rlaagaard, Anton 
Raker, Joe 
Boyle. J. 

Bjorkkvist. Ragnar 
Berg. H. J. 
Bussek, Joe 
Bratt. F. H. 
Bengtsen, Oscar 
Reiving, Chr. 
'iergstrom. Charles 
Rrumpet, Walter 

Church. A. J. 
Carr. Robert 
Cherln, C. 
Canning. James 
Chamberlain, L«. C. 
Cederstrom, B. 
Carlson, Louts 
Chekan, W. 
Coleman, W. 
Clark, Roland 
Carrigan. E. C. 

Dunne. Jack 
Dyrland, Erick 
Daymon, Bert 
l >onovan, Jerry 
Davidson. J. M. 
Davis. Harold 

Erikson. Sam 
Krikson. Einar 
Erikson, Lars 
Rkengren, Olaf 
Erikson, Nils 
Forbes, Frank M. 
Fugman, Arthur 
Franzell. Arthur 

Gabrielsen, G. C. 
Gustafson. Oscar 
Grau, Axel 
'Traudin. Ed. 
Gulllksen. Amnndus 
Henrlksen. Carl 
Halley, Wm. 
Hagen. Harald 
Healey, Geo. S. 
Halvorsen, Karl 
Hansen. Martin 
Holmen, K. 
Harper, Earl 
Hoed, Hans 
Heggum, Louis 

Tohnsen, Ingvald 
•Fansen, R. 
lohnson. Dick 
Janson. John 
Johnson, Eltaa 
■Jenson, James 
Johanson, Matt 
Johnson. Chas. A. 
lohanson. Johan R. 
Johnson. Anton L. 
lorgensen. Angel 
Jacobs, Henry 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Kallo. K. 

Karlson, G. A. -1190 
Krastln. J. 
Kragstad, A. E. 
Hoppen, Oluf 
Krlstlansen, Aarnt 
Knudsen. Andrea 
Larsen, Sigurd 
Lambert, Ed 
I^arsen, Ludvlk 
Lohne, E. 
Lasklnen. Fred 
Livingstone, Ed 
I^arson. Rudolf 
Lucy, James 
IJchtenberg, Ben 
Liurltsen. P. E. 
Ljungstrom, Oscar 
Lee, L. 

Millard, Frank 
Martinsen, Ingvald 
Macleod, Alex 
Molder, John 
Monroe, N. S. 
Mengert. Fred 
Moore. Thos. 
Margaard. H. 
Nilsson, N. J. 
Nllson, A. H. 
N'olan, Janus 
Nelson, Swan 
Nllson, Carl -302 
Nurse. A. L. 
Nllson. Adolf 
Nerpaar* *V 



Back. Chr. 
Burton, Arthur 
Bowen, W. F. 
Berge, Krlstlan 
Bauer. W. H. 
Bach, Herman 
Budd, Percy 
Bruce. Alhert 
Burnett. Norman 
Behrlng, Chr. 
Bozarth. F. P. 

Church, A. J. 
Curry, H. M. 
Christlanson. W. 
Campe, F. T. 
Corrigan. B. B. 
Christensen, Hans 
Carlson, Martin 
Caputo, Samuel 
Campbell, John R. 
Carlsen, Erlck 

Disney. Robert 
Dlckensen, A. 
Dampsey, Geo. A. 
Drennan. W. 
Delzell, W. W. 
Danil, B. R. 

Eklung, Victor 
Edvordsen, John 
Elsted. John 
Edvords, Louis 

Frog, Hartvlg 
Fox, A. -862 
Fltzpatrick. Edvin 
Fredrlckson. F. W. 
Gangsrod, Karl 
GJerde. K. O. 
Gulllksen, Gust 
Gulbransen. Peter 

Harms, F. 
Hefling, Jack 
Halmin. Wm. 
Hahnqvist, Elnar 
Hansen, S. P. 
Harper, E. G. 
Hlnton, Henry 
Hultard, Wm. B. 
Hill. Nestor 
Hansen, Nils 
Hoff. Ole 
Johnsen, Ludvlg 
Johansen, Arthur H. 
Jaoobson. M. 
Johnson. Ed. -2294 
Johanson, Olof K. 
Johnson, G. A. 
Jaeobson. Torglls 
Johanson, Henrik 
Johnson, Alex 
Jensen. Wilhard, E. 
Johansen, Carl 
Jones, A. H. 
Johnson. Gust 
Kllkeary, Frank C. 
Karren, John 
Koernbach. Hugo 
Kristensen, John 
Kellman, B. 
Krlstlansen. J. A. 

Larsen, Emanuel 
Larsen. E. -1345 
Laurltsen. P. E. 
Leeween, A. W. 
Landlung, Chas. 
Laurltsen, Jack 
Larson, A. 
Lawersen, L. 
Lleson. Wm. 
Lynum, A. M. 
Lutton, Theod 
Lyngues, Chr. 
Lund. Eric 
Mlchalson. Harald 
Musch. Chas. 
Mann, Albert 
McPherson, James 
McLean, Angus 
Mclntyre. I,. 
McCoy, J. L. 
McMullen. J. 
Nelsen, Peter 
Nelsen, Ross 
Neelsen. H. J. 
Newland, Ernest 
Nyhagen, Julius 
Nlcholsen, Ben 
Nurken. Herman 
Nelsen, A. B. 



Nelson, Werner 
Nelson, P. A. 
Nllsen. Harald 
Ovist. John 
Osterberg. C. V. 
Optedal, Caspar 
Pendville. N. 
Petersen. J. M. 
Petersen, BJarm 
Parker, Bert 



Nahinan. F. 
Nllsen. N. P. 

Olsen. John H. 
Owens. J. W. 
Ogga, Ed 
Pedersen, Emll F. 
Pahus, Laas 
Pedersen. Ole 
Pedersen, O. J. 



Pederson. C. E. -1286Permln. J. C 
Pedersen, Herman Pedersen. E. P 



Quandt, A. 
Rasmussen. Chr. 
Rod. S. 

Rasmussen, Peter 
Rebour, Frank 

Sandin. P. 



Paulsen. O. E. 

Rorvik, Chas. 
Randle, C. W. 
Rellley. Ralph 
Ross, Herbert 
Ronberg, Edvard 
Stetson, Henry 



Sater. P. Pedersen Schrage, P. W 



Skag, Otto 
Saderberg. Albln 
Scarpa E. 
Stiffler, Roy 
Sherrln, E. 
Strand, Charley 
Skaag, Paul 
Shipley. A. M. 
Steiner, F. 



Schler, T. J. 
Schlrmbel, Rup 
Sarv. H. 
Smith, Aug. 
Scarlett, J. 
Swansen, Axel 
Salonen, Ivori 
Sal mar, K. 
Stockburger, C. 



Stenberg, HJalmar Stldham, C." W. 
Sitts, La Verne Samuelsen, Hugo 



Slmonsen. S. 
Sandstedt, E. H. 
Seyfried. M. 
Thorsen. V. 
Tasel. John 
Torwlch, Hans 
Tangeros, L. 
Thomsen. Peder 
Theysen, Arthur 
T'nwin, H. 
Wheeler, G. W. 
Welkens, Henry 
Wlger, John 
Welson. E. W. 
Wilson, Walter 
Westerlund. Albert 



Semberg, John 
Swanson. J. -1013 
Sandvik. H. 
Teneson. J. 
Tripplett. C. J. 
Thorsen, Hans 
Tugmen. Arthur 
Thorsen. Hans 
Torstlnsen, A. J. 
Volley. P. 
Wold. Stadlus 
Ward, Wallace 
Wahlstrom, Eric 
Wallin. A. 
Walker. A. A. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Alaska Fishermen's Letter List. 



Anderson, Hilding 
Andersen, Ole 
Alhertsen, John 
Audrey, a. Belle 
Brumfilt, Walter 
I : round., Geo. A. 
i). Ernest 
Clark. Bruce 

Carlson, E. 

1 lentrel. Salvatore 

Klein. Knnt 

m. R. J. 
Gronnlng, T. S. 
1 lagburg Gust. 
Jacobsen, Emel. 

^ori. Olal. 



Janssen, M. N. 

.lohnson. John 
Johansen, F. C. 
Johanson, Fritz. C. 
Johnson. A. Emil. 
K'atlkrsinoli. Steve 
Larsen. Theodor A. 
Larsen. William 
Olsen, Johan Oscar 
Rassmussen, Peter 
Roni. E. 
Ryan, Jack 
Skooba. Nils 
Schultz. Walter 
Schaffer. Paul 
Smith. R. 
Tannlson, Peter 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson. E. F. 
Anderson. Olaf 

-1118 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson. Charlie 
Albers, George 
Barton, M. 
Bohm, Aug. 
Carman, P. 
Fostervold, Kasper 
Gustafson, J. 
Harris, John T. 
Molmberg. Trans. 
Johannessen, Alf. 
Johannessen, Jonas 
Jackson, John 
Jesperson, Martin 
Lepp. Alex. 
Lalsel, Harry 
Nielson. Chr. 
Nielsen, Hans 



Newington, Fred 
Olsson, Chas. 
Pedersen, Wilhelm 
Peterson. John 
Parker. Arthur 
Rengsderf, W. 
Rawley, Bruce 
Rubens, Chas. 
Randle. C. W. 
Saro. W. 
Smith, C. Johan 
Smith, Fred 
Smith, Emil 
Schant. TT. 
Tonsfeldt, John 
Torjesen, Gunwald 
Vejvada, Frank 
Vetters, Oscar 
Westerberg, Carl 
Wilenlus, J. T. 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Andersen. John Rengsdorf, W. 

Dominguez, Joseph Robinson, L. 



rarvinen, Oscar 

nberg, John 
Low, G. 

Mat son. P. 
Mat-vis. John T. 
Nelson, Andrew B. 



3one, W. F. 
Landberg, John 
Skully, John 
Smith. John 
Smith. Carl J. 
Tomphson. T, 



Honolulu Letter List. 



Freitas. Daniel 
Gustafson, Erlck 
Yungman, W. H. 
Kaine, James 



Lee, Robert 
t-auber, Emll 
riisen, C. W. 
Willardsen, Wilhelm 



INFORMATION WANTED 



DENTIST 

Hours: 9 a. m. to »:30 p. m. 

EUGENE PAYNE, M.D., D.D.S. 

At 3 Fourth St. Mezzanine Floor 

California Theatre Building 
Market St. Corner Fourth St. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 
CLOTHIER, FURNISHER 4. HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1— Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1890 
MENS CLOTHING. SHOES. HATS 

and FURNISHING GOODS 
108-110 Main Street, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



UNION LABEL 
SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

NYMAN BROS. 

Bee Hive Store 

Men's Furnishings, Hickory Shirts, 

Hats, Oil Clothing. 

Home of the Union Made 

Co-operative Shoe. 

302 So. F Street. ABERDEEN, Wash. 

on the Water Front. 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN. WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 
Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 

1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



James Kenney of Philadelphia, last 
seen in Pennarth, Wales, is inquired 
for by V. McMahon, 96 Plain street, 
Providence, R. I. 6-1-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Anders Teodor Turesson, born at 
Gothenburg, will please notify The 
Swedish Firemen's Union, Gothen 
burg 7, Sweden. 11-24-JO 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anderson, H. M. 

1495 
Albertson, John 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson, Chas. A. 
Andersson, Gust B. 
Arnesen, Isack 
Anderson Harold M 
Anderson, B. A. 
Andersen, J. N. 
Andersson, O. G. B. 
Anderson, Gunner 
Anderson, Harry B. 
Alto. John-1349 
Anderson, CharleyH 

Bersin, Jacob 
Boom, A. E. 
Bordeaux, E. T. 
Boe, Ivor 

Carr, R. W. 

Cameron. Robert 
Carlsen, Dick 
Crawford. Thomas 
Cormie, William 
Craig, Theodore 
Catherwood, Horace 
Clementsen, Alf 
Cristen, John 
Carroll, Kenneth 
Carr, Robert R. 
Calcoff, Sam 
Cordeau. Thomas 
Cords, W. A. 
Cumalet, John H. 

Deaver, A. 
Dyrland. Erick 
Dreyer, J. O. 
Daunt, C. 

Evertsen, Olaf 
Eliassen, Emil 
Evensen, Alex 
Eliasson, George 
Eriksson, Julius W. 
Erickson, J. E. 
Evans, John 
Evertsen, Olaf 

Forsberg, Alfred 
Fernandez, Chas. 
Fritze, Harry 
Fors, Ellis 

Galleberg, M. 
Gregovich, Mark 
Gray, A. 
Gomez, F. 

Oregersen, Kristian 
Gaide, Win. 
Gunnerud. Ulrik 

Hecker, W. 
Harvey, Earl S. 
Hall. Robert E. 
Hickey, John 
Hellman, Max 
Horton, Geo. A. 
Hanlon, William 
Hanson, Harold 
Hurley, Michael 
Heino, A. 
Horner, Ambrose 
Harbst, John-2905 

Jacobsen, Tom 
Johansen, Johan 
Johnson, Gunmar 
Johnson, F. K. 
Jorgensen, J. 
Johnson, Tom 
Jensen, Paul 
Jonassen, Johannes 
Jensen, Kristian 
Jorgensen, Jens G. 
Janson, Jack R. 
Johansson. Albert 
Jonessen, Fred 
Johnson, C. A. 
Johnson, Oscar 
Johanson, Ed 
Jones, Arne M. 
Johanson, N. A. 
Jorgensen, Knud 
Jensen, Marius 
Jomo, John 
Johansen, J.-1432 



Iwersen, W. 

Killatt, Daniel 
Koff, Michael 
Knudsen, Andrew 
Kopatz, Oscar 
Kaartinen, Sam 
Kallio, Frans A. 
Koski, Julio 
Kalnin, Ed 
Lodersen, John 

Lill. Karl 
Lindroos. Oskar 
Lehan, C. 
Larsen, Olaf J. 
Lueder, Win. 
Lund, F. 
Lindholm, Chas. 



Lund, Olai 
Lobelos, Jose 
Luce, Paul 
Ligovski, Joe 
Laursen, Max O. 
Luhrs, Ludwig 
Lorenzen, Jean 
Loven. C. 
Lauritzen, Ole 

McCart, Albert 
McCormick, Harold 
McMullen, Dan 
McCloskey, W. 
McBridge, George 
McVay, Frank 
Miller, Fred 
Miller, E. 
Muller, Frederik 
Malmquist, Gus 
Mattson, Maurice 
Machen, L. E. 
Mlze, J. H. 
Melaa, Peder 

Neville, Thomas 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nielsen, S. 

Olsson, P. 
O'Donnell, Jas. 
Ossante, Anthony 
Olsen, Henning 
Ovist, John 
Olsen, Ferdinand 
Onnu, Tobias 
Olsen, Ole-1329 

Pastorillen, H. K. 
Paton, J. P.-2082 
Persson, Bernhard 
Peterson, O. E.-1558 
Petterson, Axel 

Rogers. Robert G. 
Roman!, Gaetano 
Rengsdorf, W. 
Rokow, Steve 
Runska, Henry 
Runge, Robert 
Reidel, Gus 
Ruygrok, Dick 

Sutert. Ole 
Stenberg, Alf 
Steinbrick, Paul 
Sandblom, H. 
Sorensen. Edwin 
Smith. Albert 
Sandback, Geo. 
Sund, Lewis 
Stewart. Elder 
Schierenbeck, Karl 
Sandberg, N. A. 
Sether, S. J. 
Smith, Albert 
Schellhous, Wm. 
Sunde. O. 

Sands! rom. Hjalmar 
Selzer, Max 
Samuelsen. H. M. 
Stensland, Paul 
Shaeffer, Ray 
Stenros, John 
Sakariassen. Bernh 
Seagren, E. 
Seaman, Fred 
Schmidt, H. T. L. 
Svendsen, Geo. E. 

Thornlund. John 
Thompson, Maurice 

Viets, C. L. 
Verney, A. 
Viscarra, Oscar 

Woide, John 
Wilson, John 
Winkelman. Otto 
Williams. Frank 
Wennerquist, Anton 
Wilhelmson, Karl 
Wright, Charlie 
Westura, Willie 
Williams, Irving 
Winsten, Gustaf 

Young, William 
Young, Carl 
Young, Ragnar 
Zetbury, Harold 

Registered Mail 
McVay, Frank 
Murphy, Edward 
Viets. C. L. 
Silla, Joseph 
Braest, K. 
Haierup, Axel J. 
McCormick, Harold 
Nixon, Leonard 

Packages 
Campbell, J. R. 
Hennum, Christ 
Costley, F. L. 
Stenensen, A. 
Hansen, Oscar-2171 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Frank Hines, John Ryan and 
Harold Wood, who claim to have 
been forced off the SS. "West Que- 
chee" in France, December 14, 1919, 
please report or communicate with 
me at once. S. B. Axtell, Nine State 
street, New York. 4-20-21 



Old Reliable and Up-to-Date 

TOM WILLIAMS 

EXCLUSIVE TAILOR 

FOR MEN 

28 Sacramento Street 

Phone Douglas 48 7 4 



Seamen! Have You Got a Copy of Axtell's 

Book, "Rights and Duties of Merchant 

Seamen"? 

It contains a digest of the maritime and statutory law which any seaman 
can understand. 

It is an education as to your rights as well as your duties. It will protect 
you wherever you are. It deals fully with the subject of wages, breach of 
contract of hiring, salvage, personal injury, maintenance, consul's duties 
and powers, authority of the master and officers and duty of the seamen 
to the ship and master; digest of your rights under the Constitution of 
the United States. Enclose a dollar in an envelope and we will mail you 
a copy. Reduced rates in quantities. 

RIGHTS & DUTIES PUBLISHING CO. 

9 State St. Iver Olbers, A. B., Sales Manager New York City 



8.3, 
ON <ERSUNI 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 
Peaceful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
Disputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLLIS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE, General Secretary-Treasurer 



uNiowrorAK 
Factory 



INFORMATION WANTED 



I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crews of the follow- 
ing vessels. In most cases, action 
has been commenced. In some cases 
the funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney with 
me. "Anacortes vs. Barge 95," 
"Alabama vs. Brandywine," "Bell 
Haven vs. Riverside Bridge," "Bak- 
ersfield vs. Eastern Sailor," "Beau- 
mont vs. Baladan," "Chester Valley 
vs. Campbello," "Cacique vs. Carta- 
gena," "Dachet vs. Hutchinson," 
"Delavan vs. Pennsylvanian," "Delana 
vs. Nevasco," "Devolente vs. Winova 
County," "Elkton vs. Cold Spring," 
"Eastern Glen vs. Andrew Jackson," 
"Silverado vs. Lake Faristan," "East 
Indian vs. Lake Flag," "Eastern 
Shore vs. Boston Bridge," "Eas'side 
vs. Volunteer," "Eastern Sun vs. 
Jekyle," "Federal vs. Monamac," 
"Gypson Prince vs. Queen Makon- 
ing," "Glenwhite vs. Wathena," "H. 
F. Morse vs. Capulan," "Hadnot vs. 
Allentown," "Hickman vs. Faraby," 
"Intan vs. Putnam," "Ida vs. West 
Hepburn," "Lake Strabo vs. Lake 
Franconia," "Louisiana vs. Tallac," 
"Lake Freezeout vs. Liberty," 
"Mesholee vs. Johnson City," 
"Moosehausic vs. Jene L. Summer- 
ville," "Monasses vs. Eastern Queen," 
"New Briton vs. Braebrum, "Orcus 
vs. Johnson City," "Pawlet vs. Yana," 
"Pratt vs. Irish," "Shannock vs. 
Devo," "Sacanac vs. War Hagara," 
"Sutransco vs. Swedco," "Tollard vs. 
Gunston Hall," "Quabbin vs. Far- 
nam," "Tunica vs. Neponier," "West 
Katan vs. Flavel," "West Harcouver 
vs. West Hemmetite," "Western 
Hope vs. Impico," "Western Comet 
vs. Nordica," "Western Queen vs. 
Cripple Creek," "Westford vs. Osha- 
loosa and Osakis," "West Segovia 
vs. Wampum," "Western Comet vs. 
Nesco," "Western Pride vs. West 
Silkirk," "West Maximus vs. Moose- 
hausic," "Western Front vs. Silver 
Queen," "Wonahbe vs. Consort," 
"Cold Spring vs. Lycoming," "Be- 
noni vs. West Hargrave," "West 
Harcouver vs. Ozaukee." S. B. Ax- 
tell, 9 State St., New York City. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Mrs. Hattie McClellan, 510 James 
Street, Seattle, Washington, is desir- 
ous of locating her son, George L. 
McClellan, age 21; last heard from 
about year ago in Norfolk, Va. 
3-9-21 

Mrs. Theresa Moran, 313 Rich- 
mond street. Providence. R. I., is 
anxious to ascertain the where- 
abouts of her brother, Dan Gillis, a 
member of the Firemen's Union, last 
heard of in Ashtabula, Ohio, about 
four years ago. Any information 
will be greatly appreciated. 4-27-21 



Carl Tossavainen, a former mem- 
ber of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, a native of Kuopio, Finland, 
age 33 years, last heard from on the 
Pacific Coast in February, 1913; 
any one knowing his whereabouts 
will please communicate with Busi- 
ness Manager, The Seamen's Journal, 
San Francisco, Cal. 12-1-20 



Mrs. John M. Eshelman, 601 Un- 
derwood Bldg., San Francisco, is 
anxious to ascertain the whereabouts 
of Friend McHarvey, a native of 
California, age 40, last heard from 
while in Alameda county this spring, 
1921. 2-16-21 

Emil Nagard, 2438 Folsom street, 
San Francisco, California, is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of his 
brother, Joseph Louis Nagard, a 
member of the Marine Firemen's 
Union of the Pacific, last heard of 
at San Francisco, January, 1919. 

8-3-21 



J. Latvala is anxious to ascertain 
the whereabouts of Arne Wartiainen, 
a native of Finland. Anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts, kindly commu- 
j nicate with the above named at 
Box 306, R. F. D. 2, Kirkland, Wash. 

4-20-21 



Mrs. Jeremiah T. Murphy, 39 Geer 
Street, Glens Falls, N. Y., is anxious 



Ole Toreson, born in Trondhjem, 
Norway, age about 30. His cousin, 
Tryggve Hagen, would like to hear 
from him. Address, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Fore Grandinetti, of Campias, Bra- 
zil, brother of Cesaro Grandinetti 



to ascertain the whereabouts of her who died at sea, can recover $119.21, 
son, Timothy J. Murphy, last heard j his distributive share of the estate 
of in March. 1919, at Burkeburnett, i of said Cesaro Grandinetti by com- 
Texas. Those knowing his where- 1 municating with Attorney Silas R 
abouts will please communicate with I Axtell, 9 State St., New York. N. Y 
his mother. 8-31 2\ ' 4-I.1-21 



PIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 

World's Workers 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

The Japanese Labor Federation 
has invited Samuel Gompers, presi- 
dent of the A. F. of L., to visit 
Japan next April. 

Homesteads near Hilo, Hawaii, 
who are unable to meet the Govern- 
ment's demand for land payments 
and taxes, have appealed to the 
Governor for aid. 

While speaking before the Ameri- 
can Bar Association recently, Attor- 
ney General Daugherty declared that 
there should be compulsory investi- 
gation of controversies between capi- 
tal and labor and eventually laws 
making such controversies impos- 
sible. 

The Trades Union Congress at 
Cardiff, Wales, adopted a resolution 
demanding reorganization of the 
League of Nations to provide the 
fullest opportunity for democratic 
representation of all nations, which 
the resolution says is necessary if 
they are to be preserved from the 
catastrophe of another war. 

Serious unemployment prevails in 
Sweden with a marked tendency to 
increase. According to latest com- 
pilations the percentage of unem- 
ployed among members of Swedish 
trade unions approximates 26 per 
cent. For every hundred vacancies 
reported there are 258 applications, 
and the country is feeling the effect 
of German competition to a marked 
degree. 

Returns from German trades 
unions reveal the fact that only 
3 per cent of the membership were 
unemployed during the month of 
July, 1921. Out of a total of 
5.761,596 members covered by the 
returns, 170,612 were out of work. 
Production has been considerably 
disturbed by the Upper Silesia ques- 
tion and Entente demands, while 
various industries and localities are 
affected unequally. 

Manifestations of anti - German 
feeling occurring in several towns in 
Belgium recently have provoked a 
Government investigation. At Lou- 
viere a riot occurred when the So- 
cialists tried to have the German 
Socialist Sassenbach address a mass 
meeting. Former soldiers marched 
to the scene and ahead of flags, a 
riot ensued in which several persons 
were wounded. The German Social- 
ists spoke elsewhere. 

The Rosta Official Bolshevist 
News Agency announces that the 
third internationale has issued an 
appeal to all American workmen to 
contribute one day's pay toward the 
relief of starving Russians. These 
contributions are to be sent direct 
to the Soviet Government and ap- 
parently would be independent of the 
work of the American relief admin- 
istration. The Congress also de- 
manded that the British Government 
furnish practical relief for unemploy- 
ment in the United Kingdom, 

Wholesale resumption of work in 
the Tampico oil district is reported 
in dispatches from that city. Hun- 
dreds of workers are returning to 
the petroleum fields, where opera- 
tions have been resumed as a re- 
sult of the agreement between large 
American oil companies and the 
Mexican Government, reached last 
week. Production taxes, which cov- 
ered levies made on oil held in 
storage by American companies in 
Mexico, were paid by a majority of 
the companies, according to an un- 
official statement to the newspaper 
Excelsior. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



I Naval i 



•Marble- 
head" and "Minn purchased 
from the Navy by Barde & Sons of 
drydocked at 
dis- 
mantled and sold as junk. 

The Shippii d has reji 

a ll b :n former German 

in d instructed the officer in 
en negotiations 
with the bid ■ an all 

The ships will be sold "as is" 
and "where i 

Twenty thousand dollars' damage 

the Rolph Navigation 

Francisco 

trius Kohila, a sailor, for 

indicted upon him 

in A. B. Sorensen and first 

of the barken- 

tine "Rol] 

Watertown, N. V.. reports the 
sinking of the schooner Oliver Mo- 
watt, coal laden, alter a collision in 
Lake Ontario off the main Duck 
ith the freighter Key West, 
oner was cut in two and 
the captain. L. Van Dusen. 65, of 
in, Ontario, his mate and a 
won. went down with the 

ship. 

The Government will offer for sale 
the U. S. S. freighter Supply and 
the gunboat Yorktown on Septem- 
ber 28. The sale will be conducted 
at Mare Island. The Supply is a 
1 of 4500 tons. Disposal of the 
two vessels will be the fourth by the 
rnment in the last two months. 
d bids for the two vessels will 
he ri rom now on. Recently 

the Government sold the cruiser 
Marblehead and Minneapolis. 

At New York last week sixty po- 
lice and sailors were injured in two 
terrific battles aboard the freighter 
Kiwanis, a Shipping Board 
i. before a mutiny which broke 
out during the night of September 5 
was quelled. 

An S. O. S. call for help was 
out a r Kiwanis was an- 

chored off Clinton, Staten Island. 
Police reserves were rushed down 
the harbor. They boarded the ves- 
. ith drawn revolvers and found 
a gen. nil battle in progress be- 
ii black and white members of 
the ship's crew. 

The crew were anxious to get 
ashore. Delay in docking the Ches- 
ter Kiwanis was said by Captain 
Bootby to ha. msible for 

the outbreak of ill-feeling between 
members of the crew. 

The policemen, armed with riot 
;it up the side of the 

ht their way through 
melee to the captain's cabin, 
e Captain Bootby was barri- 
caded. 

ley found him suffering from 
cuts and bruises. lie had been se- 
verely bitten on both arms, which 
were swollen to twice their normal 
size. 

Leaving a guard to protect the 
the police fought their way 
down to the engine room and res- 
cued the chief engineer, who had 
besieged. 
lice then started to herd the ap- 
below, but this 
1 .. fresh outbreak 
ng. Most of the surgeon's 
work was undone. Clubs hastily 
and feet were 
by the sailors in new battles 
■~t the little band of badly bat- 
policemen. The latter were 
torious, however, and finally 
led with things "fairly quiet." 



Member of the Federal Reserve System 
And Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets $71,383,431.14 

Deposits 67,792,431.14 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,591,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ....... 357,157.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNT, Vice-Pres. and Mgrr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and CashUr 

E. T. KRtlSB, Vice-President 

A. II. MUI.LER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch 

W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. RUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT H. A. CHRISTENSON 

GEO. TOURNT I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

L. S. SHERMAN WALTER A. HAAS 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorney! 



Elliott, Arthur W. 
Enberg, E. 
Fischer. Chas. O. 
I Fagerberg, T. 
Fosse. H. 

"I" is. G. 
Hansen. Hans 

ll I. Alex. 

Hughes, Earl B. 
Jnl anessen. A. -2277 
Keith, J. 
Kallio, F. 

Klemmetsen, Sigurd 
Lange, Walter 



J. 



Ljungqvist, IIJ. 
I.;ir>t-ii. J. -Zwl2 
Moloney, J. J. 
Murphy, T. 
O'Connor. John 
Olsson, Carl J. 
Rusch, R. H. 
Seining. James E. 
Stein, X. 
Sidoroff, N. 
Taylor. James B. 
\Vnsrnr>r. R H. 
Weishaar, Rudolph 



INFORMATION WANTED 



San Francisco Letter List 

Memners whose mall Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver. Business Manger, The 
Seamen's Journal. 59 Clay Street. San 
Francisco. Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and ^ill be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Aagaar, Austin Healey, George 8. 
Abrahamsen, BernerHeathorne, u. 

amsson, P. Heldal, T. 

Gustav Hendrieksen, J. R. 

3, Walter Hetland. Halvor 

Anderson, Charll Hlldama, S. P. 

-i l Hjerllng, n.i. 

on, John -2144Hobby, Win. 

;on, Axel Holmberg, Mauno 

Andersson, Chas. Holmstrom. Bmil 

-lull 1 [olmstrom, Fritz 

Andersson, C. J. Howdie, Dennis 

-2185 Huhbar.l. Michael 

Anderson, Ingard l! ,. I,. 

Andwerck, August Hunter, Ernest 

Ardt, Andson Hurlong, Thos. 

Arnstsen, Kristian Huse, Edward 

Aune, Edward Hutton, Geo. W. 
Austin. Tom 

Jaenteh. Otto 

Baardsen, Hans M. Jahnke, Paul 

Badtni Jahnke, Richard 

Backman, Paul J. Jameson, J. E. 
Baggs, If. L. n, John A. 

Ballod, C. F. 

1 ■'■ Kurt Jensen, C. A. 

G £ ors t> Jensen, Chas. A. 

Benway, Chas. F. j ensen , Jens -1984 

Bjorkvist, Ragnar Jewell, Al. M. 

Bjorseth, EHnar Johanson.Jonas R. 

'• Konrad johansen. Walter 

M - Johansson, Rudolf 

Bolton. \ I. Johansson, W. 

Carl -1334 

Brandt, B. Johnsen, Norman 

Brennan Martin Johnson, Carl W. 

"■ ,^ dw ? rd Johnson, Eilwa. L. 

Brink, lipoid Johnson, Axel 

Buckley. RE- Johnsson. C. J. 
Burggraf, Albert _ lg66 

Burton, Art Jonson, H. Erlck 

Bye, K. Jorgensen, Emil 

Bywater, Chas. E. Juniper. Foster P. 

Carlson, Chas. F. Kamm, John 

Carlson. Julius Karlson. William 

Carlson. S. A. Klatt. Herman 

son, Carl -tool Klemetsen, Eriing 

, -..,.,„„„„ c.stav Kli.'tnann. Otto 



on, Gustav 
-776 

hi, G. V. 
Christensen. Rich. 

A. 
Christensen, EHnar 



Klindt, F. 
Klossas. M. 
Knapp, Q. W. A. 
Knudsen, Martin 
Knudsen, Rangvald 



Christinson, WilhamKoeh. H. 
Christoflerson, John iCo.-liila. Demetrius A 
Ian, Demetrion Roster, Walter 

Kristoffersen, H. O. 
Krause, Arthur 

y,C. 
Lalne, Gustaf 
Uarsen, Alfred F. 

u. Flnvald 
1 ..'irsiii, Kaare T. 
Larson, L 1 1. 
Larsen, Paul S. 

La3 ne Julian 

. Beny 
Ki'hard 
I .inch krantz, Fred 
Lindenau, E. 
l.imlroos. Fred 
Little, M. R, 

■ mes 
Lund, Billy 
I. unci. Wm. J. 
Lundgren. Ludvik 
Luoma, Walno 
Lyman, T. 

lusson. Carl 
• n . A . G. 

Mattos, M. D. 

Mackenzie, Ed. 

MdCormick. H. W. 

McCudden, F. 

McFarlan. Carl F. 

McLean, Angus 

McLean, Donald 

Melander, Qus L. 



Conolly. Frank 
Edward 
Cordery. Allen 
Corlch, Fred A. 
Creth, Dave 
Cuthbert, Wilbert 

"■ „ 

Czarnetsky, F. 

Dahl, Albert 
l >anlelsen, August 
P. 

. E. 
1 u-lin, Ole 
Diez, Harry 
Dreyer, Trygve 
Dumber, E. 

Einardt, John 
Einertsen, Hans 
Elliott. A. W. 
Ellis, Frank L. 
Esterhill, G. B. 

Foor.Henning 
Ford, D. 
i ord, E. H. 
Ford, Dough 
Foster. C. 
Fosse. Harald 
Freltak, Frank 
Freitag, Wm. J. 
Friberg, Chas. A 



1'iioerg, Luitt ■"■• _ JVleiander, (Jus 
Fuller, Everett E. Melin. M. M. 
Mess, Willy 
e, Johan Meza, J. 

I.asr MellO, M. N. 

Gabrlelsen, Peder Mlkkelsen, Olaf M 
Giske, Karl nr U. 

Graham, Claude D. Moseley, T. E. 
Groth, Fred Monsen, Cbns 

Gullaksen, l I Murphy. Eddie 



i [aave, Norval 
n, r;eo. 
Wm. 
Hansen, Olaf 
Hanson. O. -2099 Nelson. Steve 



Murphy. James 
Murphy, Thomas 

Nalai. Henry De 
Nelson, John G -1366 



Nelson. N. -489 Sager, W. 

i >skar Saren, Martin 

Nlery, D. R. Schaeffer, George 
Nllsen, Nils m. V. 

NUsson, Gustav Schibon, Paul 

\m. ho Schneider, llein 

Nicolaisen. Ancker Schreff, Paul 

Nixon. L. A. Bchroeder. c. F. 
Nilsen. Nils E. -609Sehultz. Ceorge 

Nordstrom, H. Schweitzer. A. A. 

Nordenherg, Alfred Shapiro, Joseph 

Nordling. Gust Shultz. W. E. G. 

Nurmi.Wm. Sidoroff, N. 

_ Sldorof. S. 

Ogren. V. E. Smith, Carl Johan 

Ohlsson, Johannes Sobel. Ralph 

-1362 Sonne. Herman 

Olausen, Kristian Sorensen, N. M. 
oi;i\ sen. Otto B. -2447 

Olsen, Alf. Speller. Henry 

Olsen, Arnold -1634 Spetteland, B. 

Olsen. Herman Stall, Ralph M. 

-1340 Steffensen. Henry 
Olsen. Ole J. -1020Sternbprg. Hj. N. 

i llsen, Svedrup N. Stewart. J. 11. 

Olsson, Axel -1606 Stinson, Harry 
i >lsson, Albin ne, M. C. 

i usei liowsky. Leo Swanson. Erie K. 
Oraya, Enrique 

Osman, J. Tammola, Waino 

Osses, Andrew Tanum, Helge 

Ostlund, John Tellefsen, Emil 

Otto, Kurst Tennenhaus. Harry 

lorry, J. E. 

Palm. Axel Thompson, Gus 
Dankratz, B. imson, Geo. H. 

Paul, Raymond Thome. A. W. 

Paulsen. Axel J. Thorsen, Carl 

en, M. -1535 Tlmmermann, W. 

PederBen, Hans Tlngstrom, A. R. 

Peder Tjersland, Sverre 

on. Martin Toiver, Wesley 

Peters, .1. M. Tomlin, Edward 

-on, Henning Tourteliot. \V. L. 

Petterson, Ernst Tosh. James M. 

I'll. Richard Truman, Aug. 

Petterson, C. V. Tyson. W 
Pett. Dick 

en, Eysten Valdez. William 

Pihlpik. C. Vanquest. Ernst 

Pililstrom, R. J. VdKoOy, S. F. F. 

Pinder. C. Veckenstedt. Wm. 
Pitali. Tony 

Pilkinton. Homer Walters, Herbert 

Pope. Bert Walker. A. 

Powell, J. E. Wats, m, A. 

Prebensen, Nicolai Walenius. Peter 

Pugh. John Weigel, Gust 

W.-lteverde. John 

Rankin, Orrin Wengren, Karl 

Kasmussen, Aksel Word, a. de 

Reb, Walter A. Wergeland, Fred 

Redinker, Mike Weister, Willi 

Reidel, Gustav Werner, Chas. F. 

Relersen, Johan A. Westerberg, Otto 

Relesgord, Hillm. Whalley, A. J. 

hi, C. W. Wickland, Victor 

Iwin Wihavainen, George 

Robertsen, Jorgen Wijkander. Eric 

Roed, Hj. Wllhelm. Erick 

Rogers, Arthur Williams. R. H. 

-on, Allan Winther, Johan 

-1736 Wood, Richard 

Ronning, Birger Worman. Albert 

Rundstrom. Albert Ziehr. Ernst 

PACKAGES 

Bergqviflt, Johan W.Clark. Fred W. 

Bower, U. k. Carpenter. Harold 
Christensen, Richard Dommelen, G. 



Joseph T. Ragcn is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of Dan 
Daley, a member of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, last seen at San 
Pedro in February, this year. Kindly 
communicate with the above named 
at Sailors' Union, San Pedro, Calif. 



Mrs. Margareth Watson is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
husband, John Watson, who left 
Seattle on board the S. S. "Jadden," 
and was then heard from in June, 
1920, on board the S. S. "Quaker 
City," at Philadelphia. Anyone 
knowing- his whereabouts, kindly 
! communicate with his wife at 3420 
Thirty-ninth avenue S. W., Seattle, 
Wash. 6-22-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Joseph Bert Riese, a native of 
Cleveland, Ohio, last heard of De- 
cember 1, 1919, in Savannah, Ga., 
when he shipped on the SS. "West 
Apaim," please communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Joseph Riese, 4120 
Bailey avenue, Cleveland, O. 

6-29-21 



Brother of Carl Wohmar Holm, 
a native of Isle of Nargem, Es- 
thonia, born 1888, last heard of at 
Newport, Monmouthshire, England, 
on an American ship in 1916. Kindly 
communicate with Erik Kristian 
Holm, care National Sailors' and 
Firemen's Union, 9 Dubois street, 
Antwerp, Belgium. 7-27-21 



Alf Andersen has libeled "Solano," 
claiming salvage money as a mem- 
of the crew of "Claremoant" 
He settled for $8.30 on the state- 
ment by the owners of the "Clare- 
mount" that, as the two ships be- 
longed to the same owners, he was 
not entitled to any salvage. His at- 
., S. T. Hogevoll, claims that 
$8.30 was not enough, and hence the 
suit. 9-14-21 



Phone Kearny 6361 Union Tailors 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 
50 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Fb-Grtuun Your Old Friend 




JOE WEISS 

WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

92 FOURTH ST. nr. MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Union-Made Shoes for Men Exclusively 

Repairing Done While You Walt 
We use only the best leather that the market affords 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 

268 MARKET STREET 

Colducted by Capt. Chas. Ehler. 

Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



PENNRICH'S NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Mates' Courses, $55; by mail, $80. 
License guaranteed or fee refunded. 
Write for Full Particulars 
For Sale — Sextants and Marine 

CAPTAIN W. PENNRICH, 

36 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Near Borough Hall, Sub. Station. 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 

Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



GEO. A. PRICE 



SAYS 



•BUSINESS IS GOOD. YOUR MONEY'S 

WORTH AND YOU KNOW IT. 

THERE IS A REASON." 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Office — Phones — Residence 

Garfield 1649 West 1400 

Habla Espagnol and Parla Italiana 

DR. J. D. REENG 

Genito-Urinary Diseases a Specialty 

Office Hours: 11 to 12:30 a. m. and 

3:30 to 7:30 p. m. 

709-710 Phelan Bldo., 760 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 

— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 
Phone Douglas 5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Thos. A. Jones, 720 N. Lancaster 
avenue, Dallas, Texas, is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of his son, 
Thos. Lenard Jones, a member of 
the Marine Firemen's Union of the 
Atlantic. 3-9-21 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5.00 

UNIFORMS and SUITS, TO ORDER and READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 



36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 




Headquarters For Dependable Shoes 

FOR MEN 



PRICE'S 



Agents for 

W. L. Douglas 
Walk Ease 
Just Wright 

58 THIRD STREET, S. F. 
Between Market and Mission 



AT THE DENVER CONVENTION 

the American Federation of Labor took official 
notice that 

— huge losses were suffered by workers last year 
through purchases of fraudulent and worthless 
securities. 

Convention Resolved 

— to call upon the United States Government "to rid 
the country of fraudulent schemers" 

— to assist the Government to bring to the attention 
of the union members the advantages of buying 
Treasury Savings Securities, issued in denomina- 
tions of 25c, $1, $5, $25, $100, $1000 

Buy Them Through Your Post Office or Bank 
Government Loan Organization 

Second Federal Reserve District 
120 Broadway, New York 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Q1V/I C\\C FR^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
lurw£-rvo box - m which you are ser ved. 



Issued by Authority 01 the Cigar Makers' Iniernational Union of America. 

Union-made Cigars. 

/W&3S5& \*l muKHnnHlOCMkUMia'liniilHATIOIUl UNION* Ajumc. jnoiuruMKudevolBdrottuji!- 
iJjilCm pi •>»«•«« or ike M0RA1 MATUIAl jnd itlllillCHUL WlllABL OF TH11 OWl I»rtl«r»»»l«l — i 
I «A v^llljiTV £l UiM CKjirs to ill vraktn Uuomhom tht waul. 
*vs3?r>'&/ Mleti»9»i»««uii#o»U<u.U6»l»ilbe puivthtd Kca>oin«tolM& 

If C If I U ./ Amrtt* 



K •' 



OTAMf 



^lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliilllilliiiliiiillllllllillllllllilllllillllllllllll^ 



i Mews from Abroad I 



George Tchitcherin, the Minister 
of Foreign Affairs of the Soviet 
republic, declares that in peace the 
Soviet government has no policy of 
world-wide revolution. 

The American steamship "Poca- 
hontas," held at Naples, Italy, since 
early in June by charges for repair 
work, sailed last week. Most of the 
men engaged at Naples were paid 
off, as they were assuming a threat- 
ening attitude. 

The All-Russian Relief Committee, 
formed recently, with Maxim Gorky 
and representatives of various parlies 
as members, has been dissolved and 
the members will not go abroad in 
the interest of Russian famine relief 
as had been expected. The Russian 
Red Cross will take over the relief 
work-. 

Serious rioting, marked by the 
wholesale looting of grain shops, 
occurred at broad daylight at 
Meerut, thirty-five miles northeast 
of Delhi, last week, it is said in a 
telegram received from that city. 
In two hours the entire stocks of 
the shops were removed by the 
rioters. A similar outbreak occurred 
at the corn mills at Meerut, and the 
losses are estimated at approxi- 
mately $120,000. 

The latest British engine of war. 
an amphibian monster in the form 
of a tank, which is capable of 
traveling on land as well as 011 
water, sank during experimental 
tests, the three officers on board es- 
caping- During the tests the tank, 
after crawling along the ground, en- 
tered the river Thames, where it 
traveled about three hundred yards 
on the water and then filled and 
sank. 

The Disarmament Committee of 
the League of Nations, at Geneva 
recently, gave Washington a gentle 
hint as to how to run the November 
conference, when it voted unani- 
mously to have open session. Lord 
Robert Cecil, the South African rep- 
resentative, in making the motion, 
took a rap at Prime Minister Lloyd 
George as it is known that the Brit- 
ish prime minister is strongly op- 
posed to public sessions at the dis- 
armament conference. 

Establishment of a new steamship 
line from European ports to Pacific 
Coast ports has been announced 
through the Department of Com- 
merce at Washington by Commer- 
cial Attache Dennis at London. The 
Furness Withy Company will oper- 
ate the new line of vessels, which 
will be refrigerated to provide for 
cargoes of meats, citrus fruits and 
other perishable commodities. The 
first ship, the "Mongolian Princess," 
has already sailed for the United 
States. 

Riga dispatches state that eight 
Russian Communist leaders at Petro- 
grad have been assassinated within 
the last two months in connection 
with the "white terrorist'' idol, it 
revealed by Leon Trotzky in a 
speech before the Moscow soviet 
meeting. The dispatch added that 
attempts had been made to as 
nate M. Zinovieff, chairman of the 
executive committee of the third in- 
ternationale; Maxim Corky and M. 
Ansilohitch, president of the Petro- 
grad trade unions, and to rob a 
train loaded with gold and other 
valuables on which Leonid Krassin, 
the Soviet trade representative, was 
riding. Spies operating for Fl 
and the United States are accused 
of white terror support. 



16 



T HE S E A M E X ' S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



HllllllllHIIII 

The man who says styles are 
shocking is always willing to be a 
shock-absorber. — Chambersburg Pub- 
lic Opinion. 



Florine — I won't marry a man who 
won't look me straight in the eye 
while he is talking to me. 

Chlorine — Then wear 'em longer, 
dearie. 



He hugged her in the shadowy 
hallway. 

"Oh," she giggled breathlessly; '1 
never realized the power of the 
press until this moment." 



"The time will soon come," 
bellowed the orator, "when women 
will get men's wages." 

"Yes." murmured a melancholy 
voice from the rear of the room. 
"Next Saturday night." 



"Johnnie, the stork has brought 
you a little sister." 

"Aw, g'wan. Stork nothin'. Tt 
was the milk man brought it. Don't 
it say on the wagon: 'Families Sup- 
plied Daily'?" 



"I've borrowed our neighbor's 
phonograph for this evening." 

"(living a party?" 

"No, but I'm going to have one 
quiet evening at home this winter." 
— Boston Transcript. 



A small boy was scrubbing the 
front porch of his house the other 
day when a lady called. 

"Is your mother in?" she inquired. 

"Do you think I'd be scrubbing 
the porch if she wasn't!'" was the 
rather curt reply. — O. E. R. Rulletin. 



Diner — what on earth is that 
broth made from, waiter? Surely, it 
isn't chicken broth! 

Waiter — Well, isr. it's chicken 
broth, in its infancy. It's made out 
of the water the eggs were boiled 
in. — London Tit-Bits. 



She was a shop assistant. She 
had a slow mind and a quick tongue, 
and thought herself awfully smart. 

A timid-looking man entered the 
shop. "Do you keep hair brushes?" 
he asked. 

"No," she replied, "We sell them." 

"Well," he said, quietly, as he 
strolled toward the door, "you'll 
keep the one you might have sold 
to me. Good morning." 



"I do not insist," the old gen- 
tleman said, "that the man my 
daughter marries shall have wealth, 
provided he has sound judgment and 
unusual cleverness." 

"Well, you must admit, sir." the 
youth replied, "that I showed sound 
judgment in selecting you as a pros- 
pective father-in-law, and consider- 
able cleverness in getting Grace to 
accept as ordinary-seeming and poor 
a chap as I am." — New York Sun. 



An Irishman was handling dyna- 
mite in a quarry. He let a stick 
drop, and the whole box went up, 
taking Mike with it. The quarry 
lic.ss came around later and said to 
another Irishm 

"Where is Mike?" 

"He's gone," replied Pat. 

"When will he be hack?" a 
the boss. 

"Well," replied Pat, "if he conies 
hack as fast as he went, he'll be 
hack yesterday." — O. K. K. Bulletin. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

TUTS OIJi AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
can seamen demand a man aa a 
with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 

There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 

500 Battery St, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Hezzanlth's. Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's Compasses, 
Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sounding Machines, Sextants, 
Parallel Rulers, Pelorus, Dividers, Nautical Books, Charts 
and Tide Tables. Fully equipped department for the 
repair and adjustment of chronometers, watches and 
clocks. This work Is in charge of an expert of American 
and European experience. All work guaranteed. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Diamonds 
Watches 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



Seamen! Watch for Developments 

See Our Weekly Reports Posted in All Union Halls. 

[ have said that I would never be attorney for shipowners, until the 

seamen were shipowners. One of the purposes of my visit to Europe this 

summer is to acquire knowledge as to shipping conditions abroad and 

particularly to ascertain with what degree of success the seamen of 
Italy are operating ships. 

Any seamen, who, with a view to becoming shipowners some time, are 
willing to form "a Seamen's Society for Savings" and will pledge to save 
one-fourth of their wages over their board and lodging per annum, said 
savings to be put In a depository that they themselves may select, please 
lommunicate with the undersigned. 

Silas B. Axtell, 9 State St., New York City 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Established 1874 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want your I'anama blocked 
right 111 do that. 

You'll And me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

762 VALENCIA ST., San Francisco 
Phone Park 9401 




^ames Jt. Sorensm 



SILVERWARE g CLOCKS 

for wedding presents. Large stock to select from. 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

715 Market St., between Third and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco 

All Watch and Jewelry- Repairing Guaranteed 

Gifts that last by the thousand 



OBflBUSTfrl 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ARGONAUT SHffiSfS 



STATE 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 


A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen, Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXXV, No. 3. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1921. 


Whole No. 1771. 




BirMglhi UmiHtaeinice in SIhiippaiMg B®aipdl IR©v©sil©dl h>y Senator La Foiled© 



In conformity with previous efforts to estab- 
lish and maintain an American Merchant Ma- 
rine, Senator La Follette continues to champion 
the cause. Startling revelations as to the rami- 
fications of British influences in our national 
shipping affairs are contained in the following 
speech delivered in the Senate, August 1, 1921. 

BRITISH INFLUENCE in SHIPPING Board 

Mr. La Follette— On the 25th of July I sub- 
mitted some observations to the Senate on the 
attitude of the Shipping Hoard toward American 
seamen. I believe I made it clear that the policy 
of the Shipping Board toward our American 
seamen is such that it will be impossible for us 
to build up under that policy an American mer- 
chant marine. 

However, if it is worth while to tax the peo- 
ple of the country to maintain an organization 
that shall build up an American merchant ma- 
rine not only as an auxiliary of the Navy, but 
to insure us fair treatment in our overseas trade, 
it must mean that it is important that there 
shall be in that overseas trade vessels flying the 
American flag, supported by the American peo- 
ple and promoting the transfer of our products 
across the sea to the markets of the world. 
How can an organization of that kind minister 
to the producers of this country, whether they 
be manufacturers or producers from the soil, 
unless the shipping organization which is built 
competes with foreign shippers and the owners 
of foreign lines? If it shall develop that all of 
the aid which, through taxation, we turn into 
the so-called upbuilding of an American mer- 
chant marine contributes to the building up of 
the greatest rival that we have in overseas 
commerce, then the American people are be- 
trayed in every dollar of taxes levied to sup- 
port an organization of that kind. 

Recent appointments to positions of impor- 
tance by the new Shipping Board serve to con- 
firm the apprehension that British influence is 
as dominant with the new board as it was with 
the old one, and it is with the idea of bringing 
the facts which I have gathered concerning that 
influence to the attention of the Senate and the 
country that I have taken the floor. 

There hangs upon the wall of this chamber 
[indicating] a map which I have made after a 
somewhat critical study of the ramifications of 
the shipping interests; and, Mr. President, I ask 
Senators to yield me their attention while I 
discuss this subject. I venture to say it will 
be worth their while to do so, for they are to 
be called upon, as stated by the chairman ol 
the Committee on Commerce, the distinguished 
author of the Jones Act of 1920, to vote in a 
few (lays $300,000,000 additional in order to sup- 
port the policy of the present Shipping Board. 
The Charge of British Control 

The charge that British influences are at work 
to control the policies of our merchant marine 
has been so frequently and recently made and 
upon such high authority that it can not longer 
be ignored. For example, on the 6th of June 
last the Senator from Iowa [Mr. Kenyon] on 
the floor of the Senate said this: 

I think it is a safe statement — I hazard 

the statement — that of the three hundred em- 



ployes [of the United States Shipping 
Board] across the sea, 75 per cent are 
British subjects, and some of the most im- 
portant positions are filled by British sub- 
jects, such, for instance, as that of marine 
superintendent, Captain Blake, who is get- 
ting a salary of $6000 a year, a British sub- 
ject, and his entire department is composed 
of British subjects. 

I take it that is what the Senator from Iowa 
was speaking about when he made the state- 
ment before the Senate which I have just 
quoted. In order to confirm that, I addressed 
a letter to the Shipping Board and asked them 
to send me a statement of the employes of the 
present Shipping Board, their residence, and 
their allegiance. I hrwe their reply here; I have 
compared it with the statement of the Senator 
from Iowa and of the Senator from Missouri, 
who spoke following the Senator from Iowa, 
and I find in it, Mr. President and Senators, 
that which challenges the attention of every 
Senator who shall be called upon to vote dol- 
lars out of the pockets of the American tax- 
payers and into the coffers of our Shipping 
Board. 

Mr. President, I realize that the Shipping 
Board has changed in personnel within the last 
'two months. I waited before saying a word 
upon my resolution in order to see what the 
trend of the policy of the new Shipping Board 
might be. If I had seen a radical change, if 
I had seen that they had canceled the cost-plus 
contracts under which a staggering deficit is 
being augmented every hour, and under a policy 
that this Congress has condemned, I should 
have waited longer before speaking. 

Men who are masquerading as the sponsors 
of an American merchant marine are the emis- 
saries of Great Britain. They are to be found 
in the Commerce Department of this Govern- 
ment; they have had their representatives there 
for years. I know some of the new members 
of the Shipping Board, and 1 have as much 
confidence in their integrity as I have in my 
own; but they are so surrounded, just as Con- 
gress is, with respect to news, that they can 
not get the light from the outside. 

I call the attention of the Senate to the fact 
that a man had been appointed to investigate 
the operations in this country of the British 
merchant marine and the British Government 
in confining, undermining, and destroying the 
effect of all the appropriations that we are 
making here. That man was Roscoe C, Mitchell, 
assistant to the special commissioner in F.urope, 
and it was made to Captain Foley, Director of 
Operations, United States Shipping Board, under 
date of March 14. It was a mighty important 
report. Mr. Mlitchell went out of office after 
having made it, and Foley is out of office today. 

It was an expose of what is going on Upon 
the other side. I shall not tax the patience of 
members to read from that report now. I shall 
print it, unless it is called for. It is well worth 
your reading. It is well worth your considera- 
tion before you vote another dollar in support 
of this enterprise that is reaching into the 
treasury day by day up to its armpits. 



There being no objection, the matter referred 
to was ordered to he printed in the Record. 

British Competition and Propaganda 
In this statement of a trained observer who 
was abroad for the very purpose of studying 
the questions upon which he reported, we are 
brought face to face with the fact that 'we must 
not only expect from Great Britain every form 
of competition which the law permits and' which 
ingenuity can devise, but we must be prepared 
to combat insidious propaganda calculated to 
nullify our efforts to secure that portion of the 
maritime commerce of the world to which we 
are justly entitled. It behooves us then to see 
to it that so far as possible every person con- 
nected with our merchant marine shall be not 
only an American, but that he shall be loyal 
to American interests when they are opposed 
to British interests. This ought to be true of 
every man on board of every ship from the 
captain to the humblest seaman, and of every 
employe in every department from the chairman 
ot the Shipping Board to the least important 
clerk. 

It is perhaps not amiss that we should pause 
at this point long enough to inquire why we 
have spent billions of dollars to build up a 
merchant marine and are pledged to a policy of 
spending hundreds of millions more in order to 
maintain it. Those reasons are declared in the 
very statute which gives life to the Shipping- 
Board and from which it derives its power. The 
first section of the Merchant Marine Act of 
1920 provides: 

That it is necessary for the national de- 
fense and for the proper growth of its for- 
eign and domestic commerce that the United 
States shall have a merchant marine of the 
best equipped and most suitable types of 
vessels sufficient to carry the greater por- 
tion of its commerce and serve as a naval 
or military auxiliary in time of war or na- 
tional emergency, ultimately to be owned 
and operated privately by ctii/.ens of the 
United States; and it is hereby declared to 
be the policy of the United States to do 
whatever may be necessary to develop and 
encourage the maintenance of such a mer- 
chant marine, and, in so far as may not be 
inconsistent with the express provisions of 
this Act, the United States Shipping Hoard 
shall, in the disposition of vessels and ship- 
ping property as hereinafter provided, in 
the making of rules and regulations, and in 
the administration of the shipping laws, keep 
always in view this purpose and object as 
the primary end to be attained. 

Our declared purpose, therefore, in building a 
merchant marine was twofold. ( >ne was because 
of its military or naval value in time of war, 
the other because national self-interest requires 
that our overseas commerce in time of peace 
should be carried on in our own ships. I a^- 
sett, sir, that the reason, and the side reason, 
why we had practically no merchant marine at 
[he outbreak of the late war was because na- 
tional interests, the real purpose for establishing 
a merchant marine as laid down in this statute, 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



hail in 

ili all 

•ii the 

it -will be lor the 

finance have ti 

from 

her in 

is re- 

their hands today. 

idered has 

an the 

■ ' 

what they 
.it has 
great- 
est pi 

umler the British flag, that 
r V to 
British influem 

But 

hich has found no 
hipping i 

\ n ,l m1 justification 

id and 

ir can find 

Ship- 

n the 

in their enormous 

t and 

eater than 

t a time when no 

lility make 

war ,. ; . . i can find n 

ist im- 
justi- 
I the met 

nd sent in 

States 
it in a 
mtry, will be abl« . 

h shipping 

defend ti- 
- that hi made by 

rmous 

■ 
ippropriation of 

\\ ashing- 
iry to 



■ ■ to 

. [amp- 
Mr quite fit 

l« mien to 
which 0I ms 

Mr. dent, 1 want to 

i an hour 

refer the 

i tit. 1 

in my m 

.i 
n my mind 
h the 
ice be- 

1 did. 



■ the thins 

i I wanted 
in the 
points 

lor to 

! find the 

it is. 

in tin 

it counts 
in that 

. about 
ar-timc w 

I that. 

there 
I 'resi- 



between the British tre. anient of 

i uen and our treatment ill' American 

this country, 1 do not care whether 

ganized, 

seamen in this country in their eontro- 

with the Shipping Hoard got to a point 

re prepared to state and did 
pecificall) requested as the only condition 
of priority of employment on American ships 
they should be American citizens — that is 
all; not union men as against non-union men, 
i.nt American citizens — and the Shipping Board 
denied that, and the organization known as the 
owners of steamship lines denied it. 

I ask Senators if you can hope in any way 
to build up an American merchant marine when 
you will not give preference to American eiti- 
fco sail under the American flag? Is it not 
your while to note that the attitude of 
Britain is very different in that n 
I shall read to you, if Senators eare to follow 
the contracts with respect to the Brit- 
ish ships which require how they shall he oper- 
hov\ they shall he run under the British 
Hag, mam iritish subjects, and operated 

under s which shall be satis 

rd of Trade, and in case of dif- 
ferences arising — and I am speaking now ol Brit- 
ish vessels which are affiliated with so-caHed 
American organizations, and getting the benefit 
of the appropriations which we are making — 
differences shall be determined by the 
Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, and his deci- 
shall be final. 
Mr. Mr. President, no one can 

in which the Senator from 
onsin has taken, that the American mer- 
chant marine must be manned by American citi- 
if i* is to be an effective organization. 
Mr. La Follette — 1 am glad to have the Sen- 
ator agree with me on that. 

Mr. Mose — 1 did not think, however, that the 
decisii I at bj the Shipping Hoard under 

the fatuous and expensive administration ol 
Admiral Benson, when he was its chairman, 
permanently conclusive, and I did not sup- 
pose that the men were prohibited from reopen- 
lii stion with the new personnel of the 
board. 

Mr. La Follette— Nor wen- they, Mr. Presi- 
dent. But the attitude of the present board 
ust exactly the same as that of Ad- 
Benson, who has been retained on the 
board, and the result has been that American 
sailors have been driven off American ships. 
Where they have gone on at all, they have gone 
on with heartburning and with resentment, and 
with a determination to renew the struggle as 
bey have earned enough money to do 
But, Mr. President, you can not ho 
build up an American merchant marine with 
such a condition as that existing between Amer- 
ican sailors and the Government which operates 
American merchant marine. 
Mr. Moses I, the Senator asserting that this 
question lias been laid before the new Shipping 
and that a negative answer has 
II to it? 
Mr. I. a follette — 1 am asserting, and 1 as- 
serted it on the 25th of last month on this 
,ii [acts piled upon facts to show that 
the present Shi]. pin- Hoard has not only as- 
sumed all of tin positions taken by its prede- 
but has gone even further. 
Mr. Moses 1 diil not SO understand it. Mr. 
lent. My understanding was that that was 
tter which the new Shipping Board intended 
;e ui) after it had gone through the tan- 
accounting and everything else ii 
there and discovered just where it was 
with i to all of its problems. I have no 

official knowledge, but simply that gained from 
rsation with members of the board. 
Mr. l.a Follette—1 have not a bit of doubt 
but that the Senator from New Hampshire, in 
talking with individual members of the board. 
them taking that attitude. But 
is not the policy which the board has 
adopted and is enforcing. That policy has dis- 
: of the .American seamen, as such. 
ere manning to the extent of more than 
hi, the American merchant marine at 
war ceased, and. indeed, down to 
the time when this controversy arose. It is a 
lition. It calls for the honest, 
of every man in the Senate 
n building up an American mer- 
chant marine and who expects to vote the 
monej of the people to do it. 

To establish an American merchant marine, 
it mil inncd by American sailors, Aincr- 

ns. When we passed the Seamen's 
Act in 1915 there were but 5 per cent of the 
seamen employed upon ships sailing under Un- 
American flag who were American citizens. 
the b( ueiicent pro\ isiolis of the \ci 
the Seamen's Act. we continued to 
from other occupations back to the sea 
ho bad left it because its employment en- 
tailed degradation unspeakable. 

I Tn!er i cent provisions of the Sea- 

I 1 ' 15 we won back to the sea 
American sailors; so that when this raid was 
i w months ago we had over 51 per 
of American citizens on the ships sailing 
the Atlantic very much more than that on the 
I —and we had at bast 10 tier cent addi- 
tional who had declared their intention to be- 
come American citizens. So that it is fair to 
Ae had won back to the sea Amer- 
' lg so that WC had 60 per cent in our 



merchant marine instead ol the 5 per cent, which 
was the number before the seamen's law was 
passed. 

One of the most important propositions the 
Senate has to solve is the question of this Brit- 
ish influence, and in support of that statement 
1 ask the attention of Senators to a speech 
made by the distinguished chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Commerce of the Senate [Mr. Jones 
of Washington | no longer ago than January 22, 

That is pretty recent. That deals with condi- 
as they now are, unless it shall be shown 
that the new men on the Shipping Board have 
radically changed them; and I am going to 
show that they have confirmed them, as far as 
British influences arc concerned, by the employ- 
ment of nun who have British affiliations — that 
they have intrenched British interests — and when 
that is shown the statements made by this man, 
this colleague of ours, who sits at the head of 
the table in the Committee on Commerce, and 
wdiose integrity and high purposes and loyalty 
to this Government nobody can question, about 
conditions I think are pertinent and 
worthy the interested attention of Senators. lie 
had more to do with framing the Merchant 
Marine Act of 1920 than anyone else. His pro- 
found study of this subject entitles his every 
utterance upon it to tin greatest consideration. 
Tlie speech to which 1 refer was not delivered 
ir the Senate, but was delivered at the second 
annual convention of the National Merchant 
Marine Association here in Washington on the 
20th of last January. The speech, however, was 
very properly put into the Record by the Sena- 
tor from Tennessee [Mr. McKellar], and is 
found in the Record of January 22, 1921, at 
1887. 

The warning words of the able chairman of 

tnmittee on Commerce, the Senator from 

Washington [Mr. [ones] — 1 am quoting from 

page 1887 of the Record of January 22, 1921. 

That is only six months away, in round nuiii- 

Read it. Senators. It is worth your read- 

I quote as follows: 

I )ur principal competitor for the world's 
carrying trade is Great Britain. She will do 
everything pi to keep us off the sea. 

Her citizens have vast and far-reaching busi- 
ness connections with our people. 

The eli, Mt now on the wall shows a little sec- 
if that, and there are revelations to follow. 

She has been so long dominant in ship- 
that her citizens control many of the 
,t financial, industrial and transportation 

interests in this country. 

Every word weighted with thought and indi- 
cating a knowledge of conditions to the last 
detail. 

They will use and are using this power 
to defeat our efforts to build up an Amer- 
ican marine. Their attacks will be n 
insidious where that is the wisest course to 
follow — bold and daring where that is best 
— but they will always keep in view the one 
.t thing- for British trade and 

slopping. 

We light their battles in many ways — 

"Their battles" the battles of (ircat Britain. 

Every man who discourages American en- 
terprise from going into shipping, every 
newspaper that uses redit 

our efforts and our laws to build up an 
American marine, gives aid and encourage- 
ment to our competitors. Some act unwit- 
tingly; some, I fear, purposely. 

That is, some American newspapers. 

As the Senator well s.ivs, every effort to 
discredit our laws designed to build up ail 
American merchant marine gives aid and com- 
fort to our competitors, That there is an 
organized effort abroad to discredit our sea- 
man's law no one doubts who is at all familiar 
with the facts. Upon the existence and en- 
forcement of that law we must depend for 
securing American seamen and American officers 
lor our merchant marine. We must also de- 
pend Itpon it to equalize whatever difference 
there is in wage cost between the United States 
and our competitors. 

That law was imperfectly administered after 
it was passed in 1915. Mr. Kidfiehl. the then 
arv of Commerce, influenced by a man 
who has held his position there under all ad- 
ministrations and who. 1 assert, has served 
British interests rather than American interests 
— I refer to Chamberlain, the ( ommissioner of 
Navigation in the Department of Commerce. 

Mr. President, I will digress just long enough 
that when the seamen's law was p 
and signed by President Wilson on March 4. 
1915, we were paving higher wages for seamen 
upon American ships than were paid by foreign 
ships which were loading at our ports and 
sailing out of those ports; but provisions in the 
Seamen's Act released an economic law that 
made it impossible for a foreign ship to leave 
our ports miles, she paid the same wag 
American seamen were paid on ships under the 
American flag. That worked out so that inside 
of two years all up and down the Atlantic Coast 
and the Pacific Coast every vessel that cleared 
from an Atlantic port or Pacific port paid 
American rates of wages that equalized thi 

eration on every cargo that left our 
Under those conditions not onlj did we win 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



back to the sea from 5 per cent of American 
sailors, which was the outside limit when the 
Act was passed, to 60 per cent of American 
citizens on all' ships leaving Atlantic seaports, 
hut a very much larger number than that on 
all ships leaving the Pacific seaports. That was 
accomplished in four or five years. There are 
just tw r o ways of equalizing that wage cost. 
One is by enforcing the provisions of our sea- 
man's law, thus compelling our competitors to 
approximate at least our standards of wages and 
working conditions: and the other is to break 
down and destroy the provisions of the Seamen's 
Act so that we can man our ships with the 
cheapest of foreign labor and bring American 
seamen to the level of the cheapest foreign 
labor. 

No one knows better than Great Britain how 
fatal that latter policy would be to our plans 
for an American merchant marine; hence the in- 
sidious propaganda manifesting itself today in 
the newspaper publications and the efforts of 
some individuals and organizations to weaken 
or destroy our maritime code. A raid is being 
planned on the seaman's law. Everybody who 
has kept up with the facts understands that. 

I am permitted to quote from a personal let- 
ter of J. Havelock Wilson, president of the 
Sailors and Firemen's Union of Great Britain 
and Ireland, and member of the marine board, 
written to Andrew Furuseth, president of the 
International Seamen's Union of America, on 
June 14, 1921, where it is said: 

It may be perfectly true that there is some 
understanding amongst them (the Interna- 
tional Shipping Federation) with regard to 
the shipping legislation of the United States. 
I am using all my time, and every time all 
my influence, to get the British shipowner 
to see that he is fighting a shadow when 
he is lighting the United States shipping 
law. 

There is an organization in Great Britain — 
and I am going to submit its articles of incor- 
poration in the course of the discussion which 
I wish to make upon this subject — to control 
legislation in the interest of British commerce 
all over the world. There never has been an 
hour while we have been pouring the hundreds 
of millions of dollars in taxes which have been 
levied upon the people into the upbuilding of a 
merchant marine when that organization has 
not been in operation in this country in order 
to control legislation in the interest of the Brit- 
ish mercantile marine. 

Of course, the British seamen are for the 
maintenance and extension of the United States 
seamen's legislation, because that legislation 
must ultimately result in raising the standards 
of living for British seamen, but the British 
sbipowner, as we see from this letter, is en- 
gaged in fighting that law, and more than that, 
has enlisted all of the powerful interests in the 
International Shipping Federation for the same 
purpose. That is the federation which is or- 
ganized under a charter which I propose later 
on to lay before the Senate. I shall not be 
able to do it today, but in subsequent discus- 
sions of this subject I propose to get every- 
thing before the Senate, and I will bring that 
forward. Forewarned against this foreign-born 
propaganda, no friend of the American mer- 
chant marine will be deceived by it. 

Turning to the speech of the Senator from 
Washington [Mr. Jonesj, from which I have 
previously quoted, I desire to read a few ad- 
ditional paragraphs. He said: 

Great business interests, spposed to be 
American — 

There is one of them in that black frame in 
the center of the chart that hangs upon the wall 
of the Senate. It is called the International 
Mercantile Marine Co., owning 55,000 tons of 
shipping. I am going to speak of it and its 
liritish control before I get through. 

Tin' Senator says: 

Great business interests, supposed to be 
American, are subordinating American in- 
terests to British interests. British shipping 
interests and the British Government are 
pulling strings behind the scenes and Amer- 
icans are stilling American shipping and 
thwarting American efforts. 

I quote further: 

A short time ago a reputable gentleman 
from Newark, N. J., told me of his expe- 
rience in attempting to establish a shipping 
line between Newark and England. He 
applied to the Shipping Board to buy or 
charter Government ships for this purpose. 

I I is application was referred to the Ship- 
ping Board's representative in New York, 
and he said he was opposed to it. On 
being pressed for his reasons, he said that 
the establishment of such a line would in- 
jure the business of British lines sailing 
out of New York. 

In that same speech Senator Jones said that 
the International Mercantile Marine Co., which 
is one of the principal shipping concerns of the 
United States — and I quote now Senator Jones's 
language — had "entered into an agreement in 
1903 whereby it bound itself for a period of 
twenty years to follow no policy that would 
injure British shipping or liritish trade." And 
the Senator quoted certain paragraphs from 
that contract and continued: 



In brief the International Mercantile Ma 
rine Co., organized under American law and 
claiming to be an American company, obli 
gates itself to pursue — 

To pursue no "policy injurious to the inter- 
ests of the British mercantile marine or of 
British trade" — 

and in case of any dispute arising out of 
the agreement, whether of law . or of fact, 
the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain 
is to decide such dispute, and his decision 
is final. 

I will not take time to read further from 
this notable address, but it should be read in 
its entirety by every person interested in this 
subject. 

(Continued next week) 



SHIPPING IN U. S. PORTS 



Records of shipping- activities in United 
Sitates ports in 1920, as compiled for 
"Foreign Commerce and Navigation of 
the United States," show that entrances 
and clearances of vessels engaged in for- 
eign trade exceed a total of 50,000,000 
net tons for the year. 

The total net tonnage of vessels enter- 
ing United States ports in 1920 was 50,- 
139,844, and the total net tonnage of 
clearances was 53,037,390. Of the total 
entrances 25,509,538 tons represented 
American vessels, and of clearances the 
amount representing American tonnage 
was 26,425,464. 

For the Atlantic coast, exclusive of 
Florida, entrances totaled about 32,800,000 
and clearances about 33,400,000 tons, with 
New York accounting for the major part. 
For the Pacific coast, entrances totaled 
about 5,300,000 and clearances about 6, 
000,000 tons. The balance is credited to 
Gulf districts and Florida. 

The difference between the two sets ol 
figures for any district is due to the prac- 
tice of vessels entering at one port and 
moving to another to secure cargo before 
clearing for a foreign destination. There 
are a number of striking illustrations of 
this practice, as in the case of Oregon 
showing for clearances more than twice 
the tonnage entered, and Connecticut 
showing entrances nearly twice as large 
as clearances. On the other hand, a very 
close approach to balance of movement is 
shown by the figures for Washington and 
for Rhode Island. 

The figures for vessels of American reg- 
istry show some interesting contrasts when 
compared with the totals, as shown by the 
following ranking of customs districts in 
1920: 

New York, for example, shows about 
the same proportion of entrances of 
American vessels as it does for the total, 
but in clearances its share of American 
vessels is considerably smaller. Pacific 
ports, on the contrary, show the great 
bulk of their clearances to be American 
vessels, except for the Washington dis- 
trict, where the concentration of trans- 
Pacific liner services under foreign (lags 
swings the balance to the other side. 
Florida has a marked preponderance of 
American vessels in both entrances and 
clearances, on account of the .shuttlelike 
services to Cuba. Galveston shows a 
similar condition, due to the traffic with 
Mexico, especially by tankers operating 
from Mexican oil ports. Connecticut, how 
ever, shows no clearances of American 
vessels in foreign trade, and North Caro- 
lina barely one-fourth the total as Ameri- 
can, the explanation in both cases being 
that what services are maintained from 
these districts are by vessels which make 
their clearances from other ports. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 

International Seamen's Union of America will 

be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia — 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. '/ . 

Palmefston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. \Y. 

Maritime Bl bourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offio I i Adeliade, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Roi khampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, Wesl India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 14-16 Central Building, 41 
North John Street, Liverpool. 
BELGIUM 

Union, t 30, 

Antwerp. 

GERMANY 

Transportarbeiter Verband, Reichsabteilung 
Seeleute. Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, 
Germany. 

FRANCE 

General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan 7, 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 

Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Langgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbogade, 15 Copen- 
hagen. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
( Copenhagen. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, L. Strand- 
strade 20, Copenhagen. 

HOLLAND 
Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

ITALY 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Corso Printipi Qdone 2, Genoa, Italy. 
SPAIN 
Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle .Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 
Soeiedad Carhoneros y MarineroS, Calle 
Inglaterra 60, Montevideo. 

AJRGENTINA 
Federation Obrera Maritima and 

Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (.Alios). 
BRAZIL 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedistinos 18, Rio de Janeiro 
SOUTH AFRICA 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men ami Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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Paciiio Coast Marino 

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nil 



The Board of Stale Harbor Com- 
missioners has issued a new volume 
ering porl data, listed as Tarit! 
No. 1. The publication shows the 
business activity during the 
years, terminals under control, wharf 
charges and other vital information 
to mariners and shipping interests. 

The British steamer "Gothic Star." 
which arrived in San Francisco last 
week, unloaded 561 tons of canned 
Each can contained fh e dozen 
, which were first frozen b( 
being placed aboard ship and kept 
in cold storage all the way a< 
The vessel's hold contains a similar 
shipment for New York. 

Government engineers have com- 
pleted their summer harbor surveys 
in Coos Bay district, and the reports 
show a deepening of the Umpqua 
bar at Bandon to seventeen feet at 
low water. The Coos Bay bar, i 
where the dredge Colonel P. S. j 
Micliie has been at work all summer, 
now shows a depth of over thirty i 
feel at low water. 

In answer to complaints that oper- , 
of Shipping Board vessels are 
discriminating against members 
trades unions, Meyer Lissner re- 
cently stated that t lie Shipping Hoard 
strongly disapproves of any discrim- 
ination as between union and non- 
union stevedores or other workers 
on Shipping Board vessels. Liss 
public statement, however, has 
not affected the situation one iota. 

"Sailing permits," which all p 
sengers were compelled to secure 
lufi. re departing the country, are no I 
longer necessary. The permits 
issued by the Internal Revenue Office 
as a guarantee that the passenger 
had paid his income tax. In lifting 
the ban it was explained that the 
permits were still necessary for all 
those who were not citizens of tlu 
I 'nited Stati s. 

Builders of wooden ships in Port- ; 
land, who have thousands of dollars 
in claims against the Emergency 
I leet Corporation, were informed re- 
cently by W. 1). I'.. Dodson, Cham- 
of Commerce representative at 
Washington, that slight hope can be 
held for early settlement. He stated 
that forms have been prepared for 
presentation of claims, and that when 
they have been received and assem- 
bled, an appropriation will be asked 
of Congress to cover the amounts 
found to be owing the builders. 

Over six hundred Filipinos will be 
brought to Hawaii, for help in solv- 
ing the labor shortage, on the liner 
"Golden State" when that vessel re- 
turns from her present run to the 
it. Special accommodations were 
fitted in the holds of the Golden 
State" before the vessel departed 
which will care for six hundred 
steerage passengers. 'The work was 
ordered by the United States Ship- 
ping Board to the request of the 
Pacific Mail Company, following a 
flood of applications for passage to 
I lonolulu from Manila. 

Advices from Manila state that at 
a recent conference between repre- 
sentatives of the United States Ship- 
ird ami the chief of the 
marine division of the 'Bureau of 
■ ins, concerning the repatriation 
of destitute American seamen now 
in Manila, it was agreed that they 
will be sent back home on vessels 
operated by the Shipping Hoard. 
As a result a number of American 
sailors who have been discharged 
from their vessels, both at Manila 
and other Far Eastern ports, will 
be sent back to San Francisco. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 

SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 

Prices 

Represented by 



All work done in 

our own sanitary 

workshop 

E. PEGUILLAN 



Established 
for 20 years 



OLD KENTUCKY TOBACCO 

:: year old I. af. Ripe, Rich, Nature 

Cured. "The Kind That Made Ken- 
tucky Famous." Chewing or smok- 
ing. :: ll.s. $1.00 postpaid. 

KENTUCKY TOBACCO ASSN. 
W 452, Hawesville, Ky. 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. U. Swanson Is not connected 
with any dye works and lias no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank ot San Pedro. 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 




A GOOD CUp"oF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try - 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Mrs. John M. Eshleman, 601 Un- 
derwood Building, San Francisco, is 
anxious to ascertain the whereabouts 
of Louis Bartels, a native of Fin- 
land, age 45 years, hair and com- 
plexion light, medium built. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts will 
please communicate. 9-14-21 



MARINE ENGINEERING — NAVIGATION 

We prepare you for examination in four to six weeks — either course. 
Eighty dollars pays for Individual instruction until you get your license. 

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Phone Fillmore 9 7 0—2707 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Ahlstrom, Ellis 
Ahlstrom, Kilian F. 
Apinaitis, Antony 
Anderson, J. A. 
Amundsen, Ben 
Allen. I. J. 
Allen. William 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Bill 
Anderson, A. B. 
Allen, E. 
Bassin, George 
Back, Christ 
Bachman, Peter 

W. 
Baker, Eddie 
Beals, Chas. M. 

tjorseth, K. M. 
ennett. Chas. C. 
Borla, Mike 
Breen. Thomas 
Bach, S. C. 
Bakke, Eilif J. 
Corrigan. Reul B. 
Cooper, Oswald 
Durett, Joseph E. 
Ooehring, Otto M. 
I >e Mon, Earl 
Danielson, Alben 
Dietz, A. 

Erickson, Emanuel 
Erlckson, Hans E. 
Ellis, I. W. S. 
Emmerz, Josef 
Kngler, Samuel 
Elze, Carl 
Fielding, P. 
Forsberg, Swen L. 
Framnes, A. 
Fugman, Arthur 
Foster, Clarence 
Francis, William S. 
Golden, Roy L. 
Gilklson. A. F. 
Gray, John 
Gluck, Karl 
Gorman, Peter A. 
Gallery, Russell B. 
i; laser, Jean 
Green, Joe 
Harris. Thomas 
Hall, Robert E. 
Halvorsen, Hans 
Hopperman, 11. 
Holman, Martin 
Hanson, William 
Harris, John T. 
Huber, Charles L. 
Hanson, O. 
Howell, E. W. 
Hanson, Carl 
Holman, Martin 
Hofstad, Lester 
Henriksen, George 
Hines, Leo 
Hill, Charles 
Holmes, M. 
Heino, Gust. 



Inguealsen, Arthur 
Jensen, Emanuel 
Johansen. Stefan 
Jensen, Chris 

-2278 
Johnson, E. 
Johnsen, Ben 
Jensen, E. Churs 
Joyce, Dan 
Koster, Walter 
Klaver, R. 
Karlsson, August 
Kopperman. H. 
Kluck, Karl 
Kaaveland, Thos. 
Kennedy, Bart 
Kelly, D. J. 
Kiepper. T. 
Korllz, Jack 
Kraus, Jack 
Larson, Chris 
Lundgren, Gust 
Law, H. C. 
Larkey, Chas. H. 

M. 
Lamhers, G. B. 
I.eskinen, John 
Lewis, H. S. 
Lent, Frank 
Langerud, Henry 
McDonald. James 
Miller, Winford 
Mack, George W. 
Martin. Charles 
Mallkoff. Peter 
Meyer, Robert 
Morey. Art J. 
Mlkkelsen, Harry 
Muldrose, W. L. 
Markim, Bernard 
Mackway, George 
McGregor 
Neuman, Alex 
Neuman, John C. 
Norberg, John E. 
Norgaard. Henry 
Norman, A. 
Nelson, Peter 
Nilsen, Christ 
Olson, John 
Olsen, Michael 
Olson, Tom 
Osterlund, A. J. 
Peppert, Fred C. 
Peterson, Carl A. 
Petersen, William 
Pettersen, John 
Paterson, George 
Petersen, Knut 
Pursi, Ernest 
Paysti, Anskelm 
Preston. E. 
Pope, Bert 
Pf-hle, Frank L. 
Rhodes, Russel C. 
Redondo, Manuel 
Rever, John T. 
Roser.au. J. 
Robertson, E. J. 



Rengsdorf, W. 
Sibley, Milton 
Sadling, Axell 
Spatig, Harvey S. 
Sauer, O. K. 
Samuelsen, Slgvart 
Sanderson 
Skaar, Jakol 
Skubber, Hans 
Skaar, O. W. 
Swansson, N. O. 
Smith, Carl J. 
Si Us, Bud 
Sinclair, P. 
Sterner, Charles 
Blade, I. S. 
Sanders, George 
Svansson, Ernest 
Toomey, Paul 
Thompson, Guy 
Thornquist, Adolf 
Tuhkanen, John J. 
Tolman, W. E. 
Torwick, H. 
Taylor, Bert 
Tingstrom. A. R. 

Taylor, J. G. 

Wits, Clayton L. 



Weber, Fred C. 
Westley, W. E. 
Waltei , E. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Witravamen, Geo. 
Warnlck, A. D. 
Walters, Fred L. 
Wohn, Otje 
Wolff, Herbert 
Wood. E. E. 
White, William 
Wi'rtanen, Frans 
Willey, Edward 
York, Chas. E. 
REGISTERED 
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Peterson. Carl 
Behmar, Joe 
Delgado, Nazarlo 
Worgaard, H. 
PACKAGES 
Adams, H. C. 
Heaps, James 
La Born, Roy 
Okasski. Welling- 
ton 
Scarthland, Gunnar 
Williams. Edward 



Louis Seipel, P. O. l'".x 67, San 

, Pedro, Calif., is anxious to ascertain 

the whereabouts of Fritz Griesan, of 

Brandenburg, Germany, Any infor- 

: mation appreciated. ''-21-21 

You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
in the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship it is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 

I ing of the social and political move- 

I incuts of the day. 

LA x^OLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Foiiette is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
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them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other man in public life. 

Send In your order today. 

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INFORMATION WANTED 



La Follette's Magazine. Madison. Wit. 



Fred Klein, who left New Orleans 
on the S. S. "Lake Ferona" in 
March, 1920, is inquired for by his 
father, L. Klein. Address, care the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion, 543 Bienville Street, New 
Orleans, La. Charles Thoresen, 
Agent 

Anyone knowing how Eugene Mc- 
N'ulty, coalpasser, met his death re- 
cently at Boat Harbor, Newport 
News, Ya., while employed on S. S. 
"Co'quit," will confer a favor on his 
mother, Mrs. Frances McNulty, 511 
Hemlock street, Scranton, Pa., or 
Silas B. Axtell, 9 State street, New 
York City, by communicating with 
either one. 



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PRINTING 

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We print "The Seamen's Journal" 



ALBERT MICHELSON, Attor- 
ney-at-law; attorney for Marine 
Firemen & Watertenders' Union; 
Admiralty law a specialty. 676 Mills 
Bldg., Telephone Douglas 1058. Resi- 
dence Phone Prospect 2908. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of William Peterson, born in Nor- 
way, last heard of in Bayonne, N. J., 
when he quit the S. S. "Gulfland" on 
November 11, 1918; is requested to 
communicate with Joseph A. Moran, 
43 Ship street, or John Ward, 489 
Eddy street, Providence, R. I. 

4-27-21 



To Scandinavian Sailors: 

Inheritances collected. Money 
forwarded to all places in Sweden, 
Norway, and Denmark to banks 
or private persons at lowest rates. 
Full guarantee. 

LEONARD GEORGES. 
General Passenger Agent Swedish- 
American Line, 268 Market St. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



iPIHIIilllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIH 

w§ Letter | 

<G<o>E&tt2*SIbuatt©dl h>$r th\<s Ammes'Scsiia IFedleifatSoim ©f ILsvlbotr' 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllM 

president of the federation. The object 
of collecting these data is to be in position 
to give information to all labor organiza- 
tions as to methods of procedure in cases 
of injunctions and to help them in court 
cases. The Denver convention of the A. 
F. of L. adopted strong resolutions against 
unwarrantable injunctions restraining labor 
organizations from adopting legitimate 
means to maintain American living stand- 
ards. "Not only are the courts overstep- 
ping constitutional rights," the letter de- 
clares, "but they are building a wall of 
class distinction by enjoining trade unions 
from doing certain things that are declared 
lawful when done by association of em- 
ployers. Not long ago one judge who 
represents the reactionary members of the 
judiciary declared it to be the duty of the 
courts 'to stand at all times as the repre- 
sentative of capital' in labor struggles." 



Workers Can End War 
The labor movement recognizes the 
value of freedom and it knows that free- 
dom and rights can be maintained only by 
those willing to assert their claims and to 
defend their rights. The cause of dis- 
armament and international peace can be 
promoted by creating and stimulating a 
public sentiment that will not tolerate 
waste of life and by establishing interna- 
tional relations understanding and agencies 
that will constitute insuperable barrier to 
policies of force and destruction. With 
humanization, education cultivation, the 
establishment of the rule of reason, occa- 
sions for wars and wars themselves will 
cease. The working people, the masses of 
the world population, can end wars if they 
but have the independence to think and to 
give their convictions reality by daring to 
do. For this and many other obvious rea- 
sons, this convention calls upon the Gov- 
ernment of the United States to take the 
initiative or to co-operate with any other 
nation or nations for the purpose of a gen- 
eral agreement for disarmament both of 
the army and naval affairs of the world 
and that it shall be the duty of the ex- 
ecutive council to call upon the workers 
and the people to aid in every way within 
their power and to have translated into 
action the sentiments recommended. — A. F. 
of L. Convention Action on Disarmament 
(June. 1921). 



Militia in West Virginia 

Authority to organize a State Militia 
was granted by the last Legislature, the 
law taking effect July 28. Since then one 
company has been organized. The total 
force will consist of a regiment of 1888 
men. Up to the time of the miners' row 
in Mingo county the State officials had 
shown no particular haste in getting the 
State Militia in working order, relying 
upon the State constabulary to keep the 
miners in subjection. But since the gen- 
eral commanding the United States troops 
sent into Mingo county to keep order de- 
clared that the serious part of the trouble 
in the mining regions was duo to the acts 
of officials and not to the conduct of the 
miners and their leaders, the organization 
of the militia is being carried on with un- 
seemly haste. The mine owners are ap- 
parently eager to have an armed force on 
the ground which can be relied upon to 
follow their orders, and to have that force 
clothed in a State uniform doing the work 
of plug-uglies and gunmen of private de- 
tective agencies will have a good "moral" 
effect on the people outside of West Vir- 
ginia. As one miner expressed it, "put- 
ting a militiaman's uniform on a gunman 
will not change his nature or make him 
any the less a gunman." 



A. F. of L. Asks for Copies of Injunctions 
The A. F. of L., in a letter signed by 
Samuel Gompers and addressed to all na- 
tional and international unions. State Fed- 
erations of Labor and city central bodies, 
requests that copies of all injunctions is- 
sued in labor cases and of decisions of 
courts relating to labor be sent to the 



Workers' Freedom Menaced 

If a so-called anti-trust bill pending in 
the Argentine Congress becomes a law, 
the workers of that country will be legally 
hamstrung. Among other things, the bill 
seeks to prohibit throughout the republic 
"all individual or collective acts, and all 
industrial, commercial or transportation 
combines, whether the latter be for traffic 
by land, river or sea, in any manner and 
in any part of the country, which may 
tend to produce or do produce the artificial 
rise or fall of prices of goods to the preju- 
dice of the consumer." The bill further 
prohibits "the abandonment of growing 
crops or products, the closing down of 
factories, plants, quarries, mines or any 
other productive industry when such 
abandonment or closing down be caused 
by indemnities paid to the owners of such 
industries." 

The penalties prescribed for violation 
of the law range from $800 to $40,000 and 
imprisonment for from one to three years. 



British Labor Advances 
The recent Cardiff convention of the 
British Trades Union Congress made a 
radical change in the executive functions 
of the Congress. The parliamentary com- 
mittee has been discontinued. This com- 
mittee served as an executive council for 
the Congress in legislative and industrial 
matters. The general stag, with some- 
what broader powers, has taken its place. 
It will consist of thirty-two members, di- 
vided into six sections, representing 
eighteen trade groups, and has been cre- 
ated with the purpose of bringing about a 
fusion of closely related groups in indus- 
try. Among its duties are co-ordinating 
industrial action when taken by affiliated 
unions, maintaining fraternal relations 
with the labor movement of other coun- 
tries, adjusting inter-union disputes, as- 
sisting trade unions in the work of organi- 
zation and carrying on propaganda with a 
view to strengthening the labor move- 
ment. 



S. T. Hogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer, Seamen's 
cases a specialty. Sixth floe.-, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1880.— Adv. 



liilllllillllllllllllllliDIIIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIUII 

I International Seamen's Union 

cof Aia-or.ka 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1% Lewis Street 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 67-69 Front Street 

BALTIMORE, Md C. RASMUSSEN, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

13 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Ag«nt 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN. Agent 

60V£ Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La CHARLES THORSEN, Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex SAM HALL, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex L. LARSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHARLES MARTELL, Agent 

369 South Main Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEON W. MENDEL. Agent 

707 Palafox Street 

TAMPA, Fla C. F. BIGELOW, Agent 

205 Polk Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C ERNEST H. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE. Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowline Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BALTIMORE, Md H. MEYERS, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK NOLAN, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

413y 2 Twenty-first Street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK LIBBY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

812 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON. Tex J. KOMISKIE, Agent 

2306 Post Office Street. Ave. E. 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS. La DAN LYONS, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. McCABE, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I HARRY RIDLEY, Agent 

296 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me McDONALD, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga H. COOK, Agent 

27 Houston Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C R. MCLAUGHLIN, Agent 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary 
Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA. Agent 

209 Main Street 

NIOW YORK, N. Y JAMES J. FAGAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 
H. ESKIN, Secretary 

riOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
NEW HAVEN, Conn 13tt Collls Stre»t 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



T 1 & e S e i % m e im 9 s 



Published Weekly at San Francisco 
by THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

IN 1887 



Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

IMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mall - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.50 
Advertising Rate.« on Application. 
Business and Editorial Office. Martlme Hall Bldg., 
5S Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

its must be In by Saturday 

noon of each v. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
nunications of a business nature to 

the I :er. 

Entered at the San Fran ffice as second- 

i, i ilintr at special rate 
of TV- for in Section 1103. Act of 

f September 7, UUS. 

ns from Bi is will he 

led they are of 

on one side 

onlv i by the writer's 

- not responsible 
nts, nor for the 
return 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1921. 



CARDS ON THE TABLE 



iting Andrew Furuseth as authority 
lor the San 

during 
the past tw ith rumors and 

t-hargi \V. and Bolshei ist con- 

within tlic ranks of the Sailors' 
In flaring head- 
i inpre* heen spread 

i that u tiger- 

ed directly or in- 
etlv with Moscow. 

particular line of propa- 

.■1! dish for the capi- 

ich it was not slow to 

up, and when this is supplemented 

with pamphli bal campaign, 

high time that members of the 

I nion begin to take not 

It is 

c< mi' -t. the main 

Furuseth seeks to 
impn pamphlet, and verbal 

i that a 

conspiracy v. ponsible for rejection 

propositions of the 

pn >- 

. \\ . VV. are accused directly, 

and i d in meetin 

July 11, f if bringing about 

orkers in the marine 

port industr closer 

affiliat inuendo linked with the 

ia ni is hi 
men who voted to 
• the shipowners ni ultimatum. 

IT 

that which is usualh red by A. F. 

i if I .. "la I is, in 

other to spill the 

j ents, howe\ er, de- 

i n of 

iibmitted 

by th and the 

by the 

Whi I in pn ig 

the marine unions. 
Shipp tituted in \dmira1 

- . r Steamship 



Owners' Association, the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific were invited to send repre- 
sentatives to an informal conference with 
a committee intended to represent the 
! ni schooner owners (a peculiar feature 
this conference was the fact that none 
of the other unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America 
or the Seafarers' Council were con- 
sidered I. 

At the first meetings, the sailors' com- 
mittee were presented with propositions 
which called for some slight changes in 
working rules, elimination of certain over- 
time features and holidays, with other 
conditions remaining substantially as pre- 
vailing. No reference was made as to 
and overtime rates. 

These matters were taken under con- 
sideration by the committees and arrange- 
ments were made for another meeting, but 
when the committee of sailors appeared at 
the appointed place, on schedule time, 
they were informed that the shipowners' 
representatives were engaged in more im- 
portant business and could not fill their 
engagement. At that particular time the 
"Big Fellows," the Western element of 
the American Steamship Owners' Associa- 
tion, were holding a meetin."; of importance. 
What weight of influence this may have 
had upon the situation is scarcely open to 
conjecture, but that was the last heard 
of those particular negotiations. On May 1 
the lockout occurred and as the steam- 
schooners arrived in port, they went out 
of commission in the same manner as 
other vessels. 

After the lockout had continued [or 
over two months, during which time the 
Marine Engineers had concluded a peace 
with the Shipping Board, committees from 
sailors', firemen's and cooks' unions 
v eiv afforded an opportunity to meet 
jointly with a committee representing the 
schooner owners; but in this in- 
stance an entirely different atmosphere 
prevailed, the spokesman and controlling 
[actor in the shipowners' committee, James 
Tyson, taking a dictatorial attitude right 
■ the jump. 

Propositions were submitted to the 
union representatives that were insulting 
to intelligence and a challenge to man- 
hood. In addition to providing for a wage 
cut of 15 per cent in wages and 40 percent 
ertime rates certain clauses almost 
entirely eliminated overtime pay, while 
providing for overtime work in plenty. 

1 nfair as it was, the wage and over- 
time features of the proposed agreement 
did not carry the degrading possibility 
certain clause- pertaining to working con- 
ins. 

Paragraph 3, provided that: 

"It shall be at the option of the master 
either to maintain watch and watch, or to break 
n any port, at any time." 
Paragraph 8, provided that: 
"The deck crew shall work with any long- 
shoreman employed on the ship or dock re- 
gardless of their affiliation or non-affiliation 
with any labor organization." 

Paragraph 10 provided : 

"No member of the crew shall quit any 

at any time, or any place, during her 

until vessel's cargo is discharged, 

and until, he furnishes a man in bis 

place." 

The objections to Paragraph 3 were 

obvious. There are certain shipmasters, if 
i with the power, would enjoy 
setting watches at a home port in the 
middle of the night, if only to have com- 
pany after a glorious evening ashore. Un- 



der such provisions there could be no 
time during the twenty-four hours of a 
day that seamen could call their own. 

Paragraph 8 was a barefaced, cold- 
blooded agreement to act as organized 
strikebreakers against longshoremen. 

In this connection the employers' com- 
mittee recited instances of their vessels 
being delayed by longshoremen. Mr. 
Tyson stating that during last year he 
had called upon Mr. Furuseth and Mr. 
Scharrenberg to make good their guaran- 
tee that longshoremen's difficulties should 
not delay his vessels. He added, that 
Furuseth had gone to San Pedro during 
the summer and adjusted the trouble 
there. 

Paragraph 10 was an agreement to re- 
linquish the lawful right to quit a vessel. 
Under its operation as a union, if a mem- 
ber quit — irrespective of provocation or 
conditions — without complying with the 
provisions of this paragraph, he violated 
the agreement, and an overzealous pie- 
card artist would feel impelled to have 
the member disciplined in addition to 
Idling his place with another seaman. 

Not only were the propositions vicious 
from the Standpoint of what they con- 
tained : but tor what they omitted. There 
was no provision for engagement of union 
men, or for ships' delegates to keep and 
compare time. No stipulations as to quar- 
ters, bedding, etc. No return transporta- 
tion or subsistence allowed when paid-off 
on the Atlantic coast, and live out of nine 
holidays were eliminated. Every provision 
in the old working rules of protection to 
seamen was eliminated and several new 
one- i d injury inserted. Can it be cause 
of wonder that the vote resulted as fol- 
lows: Seattle: For 8. Against 338; Aber- 
deen: For 44. Against 17; Portland: For 
12, Against 87; San Pedro: For 14, 
Against 155; San Francisco: For 14, 
Against 1010; Total: For acceptance, 118; 
against acceptance, 1607. 

Is anyone fool enough to imagine it 
required a conspiracy to reject such con- 
temptible proposals, especially when con- 
sidered in connection with the manner of 
it- submission? During the negotiations 
some interesting studies were provided. 
( 'utsidc of a certain familiarity savoring 
of contempt displayed towards some of 
the oldtimers on the seamen's committees, 
the chief representative (the one that 
made the most noise) of the shipowners 
assumed an attitude at different times 
suggestive of a peddler beating down the 
price of old clothes: a master to his 
whining slave, or Bismarck dictating terms 
of peace. 

When objections were offered to the in- 
famous strikebreaking clause, that worthy 
emitted a roar like a baited lion, excoriat- 
ing everybody connected with longshore 
work as reds. 

'Touching on the mates, we were given 
to understand that they did not count 
anyhow and were soon to receive salutary 
treatment. 

Regarding engineers, never again were 
we to be permitted to affiliate in any way 
with them, they also confronted imme- 
diate severe discipline. 

And as to the longshoremen, the im- 
plication was unmistakable, that in con 
sideration for our masters' (?) condescen- 
sion, we were expected to pursue a policy 
injurious to those fellow-workers. In this 
respect, the real incentive for an agree- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



merit with the seamen was revealed. When 
discussing the possibilities of manning 
their mankilling lumber wagons with 
young Americans or college boys, Mr. 
Tyson exclaimed : "What we want, is 
good, big, husky, squarehead sailors, who 
can get away with the lumber." 

Conversant with the foregoing facts, it 
would be a pitiful creature who would 
sell his principle for a mess of pottage. 

Now as to the agitation which is sup- 
posed to have culminated in rejection of 
the so-called agreement. 

From the moment the lockout was insti- 
tuted, firemen, cooks and sailors left their 
vessels 100 per cent and set themselves 
to meet the requirements. In spite of the 
fact that nearly twelve hundred men were 
packed like sardines at every meeting of 
the Sailors' Union, the best of spirit pre- 
vailed, and week after week the good 
order was maintained. News was pa- 
tiently awaited and that which was re- 
ceived constituted misinformation relative 
to the situation on the Atlantic Coast. 

At last reports of the engineers' settle- 
ment arrived, followed by the Atlantic 
seamen's deflection. 

In spite of these discouraging events, 
the Pacific sailors kept a stiff upper lip, 
determined to sec it through to the end. . 

Then came the steam-schooner fiasco, 
followed by arrival of Furuseth, who had 
been sent for at what was considered the 
psychological moment; the calling off of 
the strike, and since that time nothing 
else has been heard but conspiracy. 

A brief for the I. AY. W. is not neces- 
sary; there are numbers of men imbued 
with those ideas in nearly all A. F. of L. 
unions; but this fact should be of less 
serious concern than in the year 1917, 
when no drive against radicals was desired 
in the Sailors' Union. 

The spreading about of mischief-breeding 
stories is serious, but when efforts are 
made to give them color by a framework 
of dangerous intrigue, it behooves the 
membership of the union to exercise wary 
walking and ' eternal vigilance. 

If the ethics of good form have been 
violated by the foregoing disclosures, it is 
the exigencies of the occasion which have 
impelled. 

HEALTH HINTS 



CONTRADICTIONS 



When going aboard ship, see that the 
bedding is clean and the sanitary facilities 
decent. 

Nearly all the tuberculosis sanitariums 
are harboring a goodly quota of ex-steam 
schooner sailors; they were splendid speci- 
mens of manhood before their bodies were 
submitted to the gruelling slavery preva- 
lent in the lumber trade. 

Seamen and longshoremen, when unduly 
rushed, frequently overlift themselves, 
thereby causing ruptures. Take care not 
to overtax your strength, especially when 
loading or unloading cargo; it is very 
dangerous. The world will not stop in 
its course if your side is not finished 
first. 

Frequently when a man of great physi- 
cal strength is working partners with a 
weaker brother his pace wears the other 
out. This is against all the principles of 
Fraternity and Benevolence; the strong 
should always consider the weak. 

If you use your head yon can frequently 
save your back. 



PASSING THOUGHTS 



MOTOR SHIPS IN OPERATION 










The war and its aftermath has furnished 
some remarkable psychological effects, and 
many peculiar contradictions are manifest 
in the attitude of individuals towards free- 
dom of speech, press and assemblage. 

There were some American Citizens 
wdio were never enthused with the war 
spirit, and a few who watched the for- 
tunes of war with sympathies for the other 
side. 

These latter, although opposed, made no 
outward effort to stem the tide of restric- 
tions brought into operation by the cle- 
ment affected with patriotic fervor. 

Now that the issue has been decided, 
however, we find a great many of those 
who favored restrictions during the war 
period, earnestly striving to regain the 
rights and liberties abridged, and some 
making efforts to liberate political prison- 
ers; while many who were under cover 
seem anxious to lend themselves to main- 
tenance of the hue and cry against radi- 
calism. 



FF1CIAL 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



I [eadquai ters San Frafu i [., Sept. 19, 1921 

N o mc< ting. 

R. [NGWARDSEN, 
Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clav Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



The steam schooner owners display a 
peculiar regard for discipline aboard their 
ships and put forth little incentive for 
effort when they show to the seamen in 
conference, in no uncertain manner, that 
the mates and masters are to receive no 
consideration. We ought to feel flattered. 
but somehow it can't be done. 

* * # * 

The slogan, "America First," means 
nothing in the lives of steam schooner 
Operators. A\ hilf discussing the po>si- 
bility f>f manning their man-killing galleys 
with college boys or young Americans, the 
noisiest of them yells: "What we want 
is good, husky, squarehead sailors that can 

get away with the lumber." 

* * * * 

It is all very fine to hide behind the 
"big fellows." while unfair advantage is 
taken of the seamen ; but in order to 
operate steam schooners at a maximum 
profit the finest and most efficient man- 
power is indispensable. What difference 
if they arc wrung dry and deposited on 
the ash heap in a few trips; so long as 
the}' are inclined to eat out of your hand 

pretend to offer them a little something. 

* * * * 

To the steam schooner perpetual motion 
of the cargo hook in port is as essential 
as perpetual motion of the propeller while 
under way. Every time that either of 
these slow up or cease to function, profits 
receive a solar plexus jolt. 



ouver, It. ('., Sept. 12, 1921. 
Shipping and prospects dull. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



1 ■' " 
ping fair. 

A. KLEMMSEN, A 
2016 North 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Shipping dull. 

- p - B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403 



Aberdei n 

Shipping in steam [air. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Phone Main 557. 



Portland 
Shipping dull; pro 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88</ 2 Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 

Shippirfg fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128K Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 6/ 
Phone 137-R. 



While hundreds of steamers are tied up, 
all large motor ships are in active opera- 
lion, in spite of the slump in ocean freighl 
rates. The unquestioned economies of the 
Diesel-engined ships have caused the rapid 
development of this type. The first large 
motor ship was built in 1911; on June M), 
1914, there were 290 such vessels, agg 
gating 234,000 gross tons, and on June 
30, 1921. nearly 1,500, totaling 1,263,000 
imis. It is significant that the old-estab 
lished British companies, generally thought 
to be conservative, have ordered numb 
of motor vessels. 



Honolulu 
Shipping picking up. 

\\ II I I \ M HARDY, 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



DIED 

( larsteji k> Mo 1919, a nativi of Ge,i 

man | 

Si pti mbei 15, 1921. 

imnmirTWMPnmn™r«nni«» — nnwiin— mm 



The attention of seamen and fishei nun 
is respectfully dire 

It has ,i!\\ ;i\ - paid to ad in the 

Journ \i , and in spi fact that the 

purchasing pow er of seamen w ntly 

somewhat restricted we are al all times in 
a position to patronize tho: i our 

trade and good will. While looking for 
the union label, remember our ad\ erl 

The Australian Worker says: "The 

descent oi fourteen thousand distinguished 

Americans in the United States, when 

criticall) examined, showed thai ten ll 

sand were of English blood. This si. 
ment is gravely repeated in an Australian 
paper. Now, has anybod} ever heard of 
fourteen thousand distinguished Ameri- 
cans? The United States has not yet pro 
duced one philosopher, poet, musician or 
novelist ol the first rank. A single painter 
may claim a high standing, and two his 
torians gei a big loo ml fourteen 

thousand! What is rcallv mean ll'Se, 

is fourteen thousand ten 

thousand of them descended from I nglish 

stock. Well, somebod) must hear the dis- 
grace. " 



Carelessness miTIo injure your fellow- 
worker aboard ship; take pain- villi 
work; don't rush. 



\ we contemp th'i i of trade 

unionism anion orkers of the world 

even the millennium seems not ible 

■ I attainment. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



CAUSE FOR COMPLAINT 



Editor Seamen's Journal : 
As a regular reader of the Seamen's 

Journal. 1 notice that the aims of the 
journal are to inform and educate the 
seafaring class, so 1 hope that you will 
find room in your next issue for this letter. 
Tt has been the custom for union seamen 
to believe that the Constitution and By- 
Laws of the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' 
Association were the laws governing that 
body. Lately, however, they have found 
out that it is not so. They have found 
that the Corporation Laws of Massachu- 
setts, where the Corporation Charter was 
taken out, are the laws which govern the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Association. 
After the recent strike two of the officials 
were recalled by supreme quorum at head- 
quarters in New York. The officials then 
discovered that headquarters, after having 
been voted by referendum vote to New 
York and kept there for eleven months, 
were legally in Boston. The officials 
sought legal advice and engaged one of 
the most prominent lawyers in New York 
to take their case. The case was thrown 
out of court for lack of evidence, so they 
then thought they had all the power they 
needed and began to dictate to the 
branches, and any branch that Opp 
them would be closed. The branch at 
Port Arthur was closed and then the 
Philadelphia branch was closed, as the 
branch was getting too radical and pro- 
gressive to suit the officials. At the last 
regular meeting in Philadelphia, on August 
2 ( h a motion was made by O. Christian- 
sen. Xo. 70, seconded by H. Xess, No. 
123, that the hall be closed from Satur- 
day. September 3, to Tuesday, September 
6, for Fumigating purposes: motion car- 
ried. ( hi Tuesday. September C>, when 
members came to the hall they found signs 
on the windows. "Branch Closed — Orders 
From Headquarters," and no other ex- 
planation was given. The action by head- 
quarters left the membership in Phila- 
delphia, about two hundred, on the streets. 
Now, when a democratic organization be- 
gins to take Steps of that kind, it will 
surely fall. as. according to history, every 
individual director has lost his power by 
the same methods, and SO, sooner or later, 
will the czars of our organization. 1 have 
an idea the headquarters closed the branch 
at Philadelphia for the following reasons: 
At the last regular meeting on Monday, 
August 29, two resolutions were offered 
and adopted. One was to reopen the 
branch at Port Arthur and the other was 
to install the headquarters back in New 

York, where they should be. as there are 
always enough members there to form a 
supreme quorum. In Boston, our present 
headquarters, there are not enough mem- 
bers to form a supreme quorum, and. 
therefore, we leave the Secretary and 
Treasurer in absolute power to dictate to 
the large branches, and the rank and file 
in those branches are powerless. The offi- 
cials knew that the members would act 
on the before-mentioned resolutions on 
two successive meetings, and, if adopted, 
would call for a referendum vote. To 
avoid this, they closed Philadelphia, the 
second largest branch on the Atlantic 
Coast. They also, by closing the branch, 
drive all radical members to the I. \Y. \Y. 



or other organizations, while they draw 
their salaries from the treasury that the 
membership have paid into for our own 
advancement through organization. 

Our officials, seemingly, do not believe 
in freedom of speech or personal opinion, 
or else why do they fear Progressive mem- 
bers? I warn all sailors, in the name of 
Philadelphia P>ranch, to beware of the 
dictatorship of leaders. When the rank 
and file are no longer considered, it is 
time we should elect officers who will 
consider us, and put such men in office. 
Here in Philadelphia the spirt of seamen 
is high. They will not throw their books 
away, but will pay their dues, in some 
other branch, and keep their books until 
we become amalgamated in one Rig Union 
Universally. 

Fraternally yours, 

PETER SP.PP. Xo. 947. 

236 Monroe St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 



PEDRO LONGSHOREMEN EARNEST 



'fhe following communication from 
Local Xo. o,S-18, I. L. A., of San Pedro, 
under date of September 12. 1^21, re- 
veals a strong desire for real constructive 
effort towards a better understanding and 
closer affiliation of transport workers, 
ashore and afloat : 
To All Transport Workers of the Pacific 

Coast. 
( i-reetings : 

We. the Longshoremen of San Pedro. 
Gal., are in receipt of a communication 
from the District Office of tin- Interna- 
tional Longshoremen's Association, under 
date of August 25, addressed to all Trans- 
port Workers of the Pacific Coast, notify- 
ing them that the first steps for closer 
affiliation has been started and that resolu- 
tions were introduced and endorsed at the 
A. F. of L. Convention at Denver, the 
Washington State federation of Labor and 
the International Longshoremen's Conven- 
tion held at Buffalo, X. Y.. July, 1921, for 
the creation of a Transport Department 
in the American Federation of Labor. 

Realizing the rottenness of the industrial 
system under which we are working, 
wish to bring before all members of the 
Transportation Unions the necessity of im- 
mediately getting busy and sending rep- 
resentatives to a centrally located port for 
the purpose of forming rules to govern a 
Federation of Transport Workers of the 
Pacific Coast, which will be acceptable to 
all concerned and then submitted to a 
referendum of all members of the Trans- 
portation Unions. 

We respectfully request that you read 
this at your next meeting and notify the 
undersigned committee whether your body 
is in favor of closer affiliation by forming 
a Federation of Transport Workers. 

All Transport Locals on the Pacific- 
Coast are being requested to send then- 
opinion on the question to this office and 
the results will be submitted to all locals 
concerned. 

Fraternally submitted, 
CHAS. G. PETERSON, 
M. J. CAULFIELD, 

[Seal | J. S. KELLY, 

ED. P. COX ROY. 
PALL SYMAN, 

Committee. 

P. O. Box 404, San Pedro, Cal. 



ABERDEEN IS INTERESTED 



Aberdeen. Wash. 

Editor Seamen's Journal : 

I honestly believed that we. the Sailors' 
Union, paid dues to the American Federa- 
tion of Labor in order to receive support 
of other unions who pay in like manner. 
This is no ( ). I',. I", idea, but if we pay 
money for support we ought to get it. 
Why do we pay when there was no help 
forthcoming in time of strike: is it to keep 
a few fat men and chairwarmers in fat 
jobs? If so. they have messed matters up 
so that longshoremen were compelled to 
load and unload scab vessels, even though 
belonging to the same old A. F. of I... as 
we do. 

I really do not see the idea of Comrade 
Furuseth trying to keep us alone when 
we cannot be alone. We put Up our good 
hard-earned coin and when we get into 
trouble go it alone. The A. F. of L. has 
nothing to say and claim no power to keep 
longshoremen, teamsters, firemen and 
others together, but when it comes to pay- 
ing big official salaries and collecting the 
per capita they are there always. 

I believe when one union is attacked 
others should go to their defense and not 
aid scabs to break strikes, and if we have 
no such power now it is high time we 
changed our policy and came together 
with others. 

Why are some of our union officers, 
who are such close friends of certain ship- 
owners, always against solidarity in the 
transport industry? We must have real 
unionism in order to win a strike: the past 
has taught us that much. The only time 
a controversy is ever considered won by a 
single union is when the employers - 1 e 
tit to settle the matter themselves. We 
cannot remain apart. BO why not get 
together. 

L. BARTELS, 



DEFENDS OUR REPUTATION 



Aberdeen, Wash. 
September 13, 1921. 
Editor Seamen's Journal: 

Dear Comrade: — At last night's meeting 
a pamphlet was read which was composed 
by A. Furuseth, which was supposed to 
expose a great conspiracy of the "wob- 
blies" tt. destroy the I. S. U. Now, insofar 
as the Easl Coast and San Francisco is 
concerned, I have serious doubts of the 
truth of his report, but am not in a posi- 
tion to dispute him, so admit him the 
right to accuse, provided he has the evi- 
dence he claims to have. But when he 
says there was a conspiracy between the 
I. W. W. ami members of the I. S. P.. 
which includes San Pedro Branch, I main- 
tain it is a damnable lie. and he can not 
prove it otherwise. 

I was on the strike committee from 
May 1 until the strike was called off and 
received the confidence of all concerned, 
including the I. L. A., the so-called radi- 
cals, also the firemen and cooks. I was 
around from early morn until late at night 
from May 1 until August 1, and can state 
with confidence that no such conspiracy 
ever reached this branch, as claimed by 
Furuseth. 

When the steam schooner agreement 
was sent here to be voted on it was 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



guarded behind lock and key until read in 
open meeting, and not even the strike 
committee knew the contents until the last 
minute; yet it was condemned immediately 
by some of the most conservative mem- 
bers of the union. No man with the 
brain of a flea or principle of a yellow 
cur would stoop so low as to accept such 
an impudent proposition. 

Again, Furuseth states that two days 
after the agreement was turned down an 
agitation was on foot to call the strike 
off. I brand that statement as lie number 
two, insofar as San Pedro was concerned, 
and furthermore, it seems queer that when 
the vote was taken to call the strike off 
those members who were most bitterly 
opposed to acceptance of the agreement 
voted to continue the strike. These men 
seemied to remember only A. Furuseth's 
first command to fight to the finish. 

I write these lines with much regret 
as it hurts to be compelled to speak so 
bitter to a man like Furuseth, who has 
fought so hard in our cause, and still, no 
doubt, thinks himself justfiied in taking 
such unfair means to gain his own ends. 
I, for one, rebel against a father who 
attempts to destroy my honest brother for 
no other reason than a difference of 
opinion. 

You must find space to publish these 
lines and I take upon myself full responsi- 
bility of same. I have much more that 
should be said, but will not ask the space. 

If Comrade Furuseth would make an 
I. W .W. out of every member of the 
International Seamen's Union who does 
not agree with his old-fashioned ideas, 
then at least 90 per cent of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific are I. W. Ws. 

1 Mease publish this and by all means 
see that Comrade Furuseth receives a 
copy. 

Fraternally, 
R. E. MILLER, No. 2536. 



IN THE ROLE OF JUDAS 



(By the Federated Press) 

Herbert Hoover has been considerably 
embarrassed in his plans for Russian relief 
by the wide publicity given to an article 
in The World's Work for June, in which 
Capt. T. T. C. Gregory, Mr. Hoover's 
chief lieutenant in Central Europe in 
1919, boasts that he used the machinery 
of the American relief administration to 
overthrow the Hungarian Soviet republic. 

In the article entitled "Overthrowing a 
Red Regime," Captain Gregory claims that 
he conspired with "Moderate" labor 
leaders of Hungary to overthrow the 
Soviet government. As an incident to his 
manipulation of the machinery of the 
American relief administration for counter 
revolutionary purposes, Captain Gregory 
relates how he accepted $1,000,000 in cash 
from the Flungarian Soviet government 
for food supplies which he never intended 
to deliver to them. 

In the summer of 1919, it seems, the 
"salvation" of Central Europe depended 
on the immediate ousting of Bela Kun 
from his position as Bolshevist dictator of 
Hungary. That was Captain Gregory's 
task. And Mr. Hoover "recjuired no ex- 
haustive explanation of our situation to 
spur him on to the most strenuous 
efforts." 

Several times, it appears, the assistant 



commissar of food of the Hungarian Soviet 
republic had come secretly to Captain 
Gregory in Vienna, begging to be allowed 
to buy food for the starving people of 
Hungary. "I had refused him absolutely," 
says Mr. Hoover's man, "for there was a 
blockade on red Hungary. I had told 
him from the first that we would have no 
dealings of any nature with Bolshevism 
and that he was wasting his time asking 
me." 

Forty-eight hours before the coup was 
to be sprung in Budapest, Captain Gregory 
sent for this Soviet commissar and told 
him that he might reconsider his refusal 
to sell food to the Hungarian people. "He 
almost cried with joy." But the food 
must be paid for in cash, stipulated Greg- 
ory, a million dollars in cash. The com- 
missar agreed. "There were tears in his 
eyes," writes the captain, "and I knew I 
could trust him." Next day the money 
was brought. The captain took it and 
placed it in a Vienna vault. Did he then 
in return deliver food to the Hungarian 
Soviet republic from which he had ac- 
cepted this money? He did not! He 
closed a deal with the packers and told 
them to hold the food for instructions. 

The coup was sprung in Budapest. The 
Soviet government went down. Captain 
Gregory released the food. "Within a 
few hours," he relates with a relish, "the 
people were eating the bread and the fats 
that the Bolsheviki, all unknowing and 
certainly never conscious of the irony of 
the situation, had bought through me." 



NORWAY'S SHIPPING REVIVES 



Silas B. Axtell reports the following 
from Christiania, Norway: 

"Unofficially I attended or was present 
al Stockholm during the two days of the 
Seafarers' Federation Conference. It was 
attended by delegates of the following 
countries: England, France, Norway, 
Sweden. Denmark, Holland and the United 
States. Italy, Belgium, Germany, South 
America not being represented. I met 
all of the delegates and enjoyed the ex- 
perience. Today, I arrived at Christiania, 
the capital of Norway, a small city of 
270,000 people, but a busy one. The 
money exchange is low. Consequently 
their shipping has revived more quickly 
than some others. A few months ago 
there were 150 ships laid up in this 
harbor but today there are only twelve. 

"I had the pleasure of calling on Local 
Secretary Andre Fide and Vice-President 
of the Norwegian Seamen's and Firemen's 
Union, O. Nilson, — President Birkland 
being at the Stockholm conference. Wages 
of firemen here now are 283 Kroners ; 
sailors, 278 Kr. At present exchange, that 
equals $36.40, but at normal exchange 
would be about the same as our own $70 
or ^7?. However, you can buy about as 
much in Norway for $36 as you can in 
the States for $72. So there is really 
not much difference. Christiania, as most 
sailors know, has a fine harbor and is a 
busy little city. The people are in spirit 
more like Americans than most Europeans. 
What business there is in the world 
seems to go to the countries where the 
exchange is lowest, to-wit: Germany and 
Norway. The harbor of Gateborg and 
Stockholm, Sweden, have many vessels 
laid Up here. They have scarcely any 
idle ones." 



HOW THE COLOR SEAS WERE 
NAMED 



There are several large seas which were 
named for their color. The White Sea 
bears its name with perhaps the best 
reason of any. Its shores are covered 
with snow the greater part of the year, 
and its frozen surface is for that time a 
snowy plain. 

The Red Sea is also entitled to its 
name. Through its clear waters the reefs 
of red coral are clearly to be seen. Much 
of its rocky bed is the growth of the 
coral insect. Another reason, and prob- 
ably the true one for the name of this 
sea, is the fact that along its shores lies 
ancient Edom. This name signifies red. 

In the case of the Yellow Sea its name 
is sufficiently accounted for from the ap- 
pearance of its water. The sea receives a 
great deal of mud from the rivers of 
China, moreover, it is shallow, and the 
sandy bottom gives its own color a long 
way out from the shore. 

The Black Sea affords no clear account 
of its name. The waters are not black, 
but blue. The Greeks, when they first 
became acquainted with this sea, called it 
by a name which signifies The Inhos- 
pitable. Later they changed it to the 
Hospitable. It has naturally been inferred 
by this change of name, that upon further 
acquaintance, the Greek sailors found these 
waters friendly. But the Greeks were 
inclined to give soft and flattering names 
to the objects of their dread, and that 
may be what they did in this particular 
case. The Greek name holds to this day 
among the older nations of Europe. The 
Russians called the sea Black. It seems 
likely that this name was suggested by 
contrast. The sea lies south of Russia, 
as the White Sea lies to the north. Had 
the latter been called the North Sea, then 
the Hospitable of the Greeks might have 
been named by the Russians, South Sea. 
In the same way Black Sea was named in 
contrast to the White Sea. — Wellspring. 



UNEMPLOYMENT IN ITALY 



On August 1 Italian official records 
showed a total of unemployed in the 
country of 315,000 men, 98,000 women— 
a total of 413,000 — according to a cable 
received from Commercial Attache Henry 
C. McLean at Rome. 

This includes all classes of workers, in- 
dustrial, agricultural, and office employes. 
The increase of unemployed has been 
163,000 since May 1 and 26,000 since 
July 1. The total is approximately equal 
to April, 1919. Metal working, textile and 
building industries are the ones apparently 
most affected. 



THUNDER AND LIGHTNING 



Thunder follows lightning because the 
electric discharge, as it breaks its way 
through the atmosphere, instantaneously 
heats the air in its path. This sudden 
heating causes a violent expansion of the 
air along the path of the lightning Hash 
and a violent compression of the cool air 
farther away. This process starts a great 
air wave, which occurs nearby, the sharp 
'Tackling reports come from its branches, 
and the heavy crash comes from the trunk 
of the flash. 






THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WASHINGTON LETTER 

| I'.-. "Id) 



Bread Asked; Stones Received 
Secretary of the Navy Denby, after 
flatly refusing to argue his decision that 
the basic wage in the navy yards shall 
be reduced from 84 cent? to 73 cents an 
hour, told a protesting delegation of shop 
craft officials that "in less than six months 
there will be millions of men ready to take 
same jobs at 40 cents an hour." 
Was it a threat, or merely a taunt, to 
the million-, of unemployed throughout the 
country? The navy yards workers' 
spokesmen, hearing it spoken, were not 
sure. But "Jack' - Anderson, vice-president 
the International Association of Ma- 
chinists, spoke up in answer. Me told 
Denby that the workers in the yards did 
not take kindly to a Government that 
would take advantage of such a situation 
of misery to \vn their wa 

But Denby knew that he held the 
strongest position; he could, lor the time 
being, safely defy the union.-. So he told 
Anderson and the others that he would 
not discuss the issue; he was not going to 
change his decision. 

etary of Labor Davis, who is a sort 
of amiable listening clerk for the admin 
tration, was then called upon, lie agreed 
to intercede with Denby to postpone the 
enforcement of the wage cut if the em- 
ployes could convince him that the case 
should he reopened. They agreed to send 
him a memorandum, which was sent him 
today. 

In this memorandum Anderson points 
out that the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
in August, I'M'*, figured out a standard of 
living for a working class family of man. 
wife and three children, on a basis of 
"health and decency," as understood in 
America. The items named in this budget 
for a livini ird, if purchased at the 

lo.W price figures of May, 1921, in the 
i the nineteen chief seacoast 
cities, would post $2276.68. If the man in 
this typical family worked six days a 
week, fifty-two weeks in the year, he 
would require a wage of 91 cents an 
hour for an eight-hour to meet that stand- 
ard. The wage decreed by the autocratic 
Denby is S14.4X per week below the stand- 
ard nf living. 

Denby is now trying to cover up, for the 
moment, his attempt to degrade the wage 
standards of the country, by announcing 
that he is working on plans to give six 
days' work each week to the employes in 
place of the present live days. Thereby 
will have standards of 

hours as well as of pay. 

Columbia Lodge, 1. A. of M.. called a 
big mass meeting of the local yard em- 
it Sunday. Three thousand 
turned out. and the speeches were red-hot. 
ihnston, Anderson and Davison of the 
•icral officers of the Machinists sp 
did \. 1'. Alifas, president of District 
44, which comprises all navy yards and 
'iials. Nun brief talks were made 

by the rank and tile. Resolutions were 
adopted which President John-ton under- 
ident I larding, but 
the latter v or Atlantic City on a 

fishing and golf trip when the Machinsts' 
chief arrived at tin seaside resort, and the 
lutions ken in charge by the 

retarv to Mr. Harding'. 



The resolutions, which were the out- 
come of the most intense meeting in the 
history of the navy yard workers here, 
recite that the right of all workers to a 
living wage was officially declared and 
established during the war. and that Secre- 
tary of Labor Davis, in his recent address 
at Detroit on Labor Day. declared for bet- 
ter than a living wage — a wage which will 
permit of saving. They then show that 
the Denby decision to cut wages to 73 
cents is a return to the policy of treating 
labor as a commodity, and is an imitation 
of the heartless policy of certain private 
employers toward the workers. They pro- 
test against this reversal of previous 
ernmental policy as an unjust interpreta- 
tion of the wage law and of the facts and 
figures placed before the wage board. 

The resolutions further call upon Presi- 
dent Harding to direct Secretary Denby 
to ado] it a wage scale in keeping with the 
'f living "and thus carry out 
the real wishes of the masses of the people 
of the United States as against the in- 
sistent and well-defined plans of minorities 
of our population who desire apparently 
to see the wage earner reduced to poverty, 
want and subserviency." 

A nation-wide campaign of pro 
against this attack on the standard of liv- 
ing of American labor by the administra- 
tion is to be conducted by the navy yard 
worker-. 

Plutes Fear Exposure 
The Governor of Maryland ha- risen 
to the emergency created by a proposal 
that the "slave auction" which has created 
so much interest in the unemployed situa- 
tion, be' imitated in Baltimore. Me de- 
nounces the plan as a reproach to the 
State, and sternly forbids the unem- 
ployed to make their misery known thus 
publicly. Nevertheless, the experiment 
tried by Ledoux on Boston Common is 
firing the imagination of the American 
public, and it is probable that soon we 
shall -ee a similar auction of wage slaves 
in many industrial cities all over the coun- 
try. For the Governor of Maryland did 
nothing to reduce unemployment or hun- 
ger by his outburst of speech. Six mil- 
are -till looking for jobs, and the 
national administration is at its poor wits' 
end for a remedy that will not hurt the 
rich. 

It appears every clay more rertain that 
the unemployment conference which is to 
be staged by Mr. Hoover on behalf of 
President Harding, will prove anothi 
those Civic Federation affairs, in which 
labor will get its usual head-patting, and 
the suggestion that it run along and 
rudely asking for bread and butter. Con- 
siderable discussion <<i projects for the 
undertaking of public improvements will 
be had. The gentlemen will remark that 
of course the sui -dans de- 

pends upon a reasonable reduction in the 
present rate of common and .-killed labor. 
Then the railroads will be mentioned as 
the chief cause of the industrial depres- 
sion.' Labor representatives — not directly 
affiliated with the railroad labor organiza- 
tions — will be begged to give their ap- 
proval to the u scheme to turn 
<ner $500,000,000 from the Treasury to 
finance the railroad corporations in their 
further efforts to crush railway labor and 
to bolster up all the profiteering corpora- 
tions with which they are interlocked. If 



labor delegates selected by Mr. Hoover 

can be bamboo/led that far they may be 
led along to an endorsement of some plan 
to subsidize the Chicago meat packers, the 
coa loperators or the steel barons. The 
game has no limit, so long as nothing i.- 
to strengthen the working class side 
of the struggle for power. 

Operators Are Arrogant 
< >ne of the most arrogant of recent 
displays of corporate control of Govern- 
ment is the telegram from '/.. T. Vinson, 
general counsel for the West Virginia coal 
operators, to Senator Kenyon, chairman 
of the Senate Committee investigating the 
mine strike war in Mingo county. Vinson 
announces that the district attorney of 
Mingo county asked him to appeal to 
Chairman Kenyon to postpone further in- 
vestigation of the Mingo trouble until after 
the completion of the trials of strikers on 
charges of murder and arson, in Mingo, 
and until the Logan County Grand Jury 
shall have finished "its investigation of the 
l1 insurrection directed toward that 
county." The operators' lawyer, to whom 
the district .attorney turned as to his su- 
perior officer and owner, remarks to Ken- 
yon that the coming of the Senate Com- 
mittee at this time, as arranged by Ken- 
yon. would "embarrass" the Grand Jury 
of Logan County and the trials of the 
strikers in Mingo county. 

Anyone who knows the history of the 
prostitution of the courts and officers 
of justice- in West Virginia to the 
ends of the coal operators, may guess 
the ruthless means that may be employed 
to convict large numbers of brave and 
innocent men in the present struggle. As 
civil rights have not existed for free 
workers in Logan county in many years. 
the very mention of a Grand Jury investi- 
gation there is a blasphemy of law and 
justice. While gunmen and their owners 
are preparing for a grim vengeance upon 
the rebellious mine slaves of West Vir- 
ginia, their cynical lawyer telegraphs 
Senator Kenyon a warning that any visit 
by United States Senators at this time 
would be "embarrassing." 

It is a relief to note, in the midst of the 
reactionary tide of affairs in this country, 
that Mexico goes her serenely liberal way. 
The Mexican Government has written the 
officers of the International Association of 
Machinists here asking for detailed bids 
from "fair" firms in the United State- on 
railway cars of various kinds, to be 
sold on three year>' credit. Bids are 
asked, also, on .a purchase of 25.fKX) tons 
of steel rail-. 

The Machinists are getting strong sup- 
port from the Mexican Government, at 
in fighting unemployment for their 
members here in the United States. Hut 
the State Department, under pressure 
from Mr. Harding's backers, will not 
reCOgTlize Mexico. 



WHY NOT IMITATE? 



The Tena/.e- property of four million 
acres in the State of Chihuahua. Mexico, 
has been ordered to be restored to the 
nation because of failure to comply with 
the colonization contract with which it 
obtained. It is the law in Mexico 
that if holder- of open land refuse to put 
it to Some use the land is confiscated bv 
the Government and distributed among 
land-hungry peasants. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



PECULIAR PREPARATIONS 



There is substantial evidence that, for 
some specific reason, conspiracy charges 
were being hatched at Washington, D. C, 
previous to the arrival of Andrew Furu- 
seth on the Pacific Coast. This was some 
time in advance of the alleged discovery 
of a supposed plot by Flynn and Furuseth 
at San Pedro, as contained in the recent 
pamphlet. 

The following appeared in Labor's offi- 
cial paper of Los Angeles, the Citizen, 
August 5, 1921 : 

By LAURENCE TODD 
( Federated Press Staff Correspondent) 

Washington. — Andrew Fnrnseth, president of 
the International Seamen's Union of America, 
has left his headquarters here for San Fran- 
cisco, in the hope of recovering control of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, one of the 
constituent bodies of the international union, 
from the element which recently proved to be 
supported by an overwhelming majority of the 
members attending its meetings. 

"The T. W. W. have seized our union and 
are eating it up," said Furuseth, lifelong 
spokesman of the organization, on his departure 
for the West. "Their tactics, familiar enough 
to the whole trade union movement, are now 
being employed to leave nothing but the rags 
of our union. I am going out to gather up 
the rags." 

He said that the Xew York branch of the 
sailors' organization on the Atlantic had just 
been captured by the same element and that 
the regular officers, when the meeting on 
Thursday night voted in violation of the consti- 
tution to pay benefits to members when the 
strike had been called off, adjourned the meet- 
ing. The membership, under the influence of 
the new leaders, whom he branded as "wreck- 
ers," remained in session, chose new officers, 
and on Friday went into court to force the 
regular officers to surrender the property of 
the branch. 

Against Furuscth's version of the affair is 
the one published in the Seamen's Journal by 
its elected editor, J. Vance Thompson, who 
presided at a meeting in San Francisco on 
July 11 when the wage agreement urged by 
Furuseth was rejected by a majority of over 
IS to 1. At that meeting resolutions were 
adopted which denounced the long-standing 
policy of the union's leaders — meaning Furu- 
seth — of standing aloof from the longshoremen 
and other workers along the water front. 
These resolutions declared the old policy to 
have served the interests of the shipowers and 
to have injured the workers and provided for 
an immediate attempt, through a committee, 
to form an alliance with the longshoremen and 
all other transport workers. 

Thompson's account of the meeting declares 
that the nearly twelve hundred men in the hall 
adopted these resolutions with a shout which 
was well nigh unanimous. 

The first indication of the present develop- 
ment in one of the most conservative labor 
organizations in the country was the defeat 
of Paul Scharrenberg by J. Vance Thompson, 
some months ago, as editor of the Seamen's 
Journal. Scharrenberg is secretary of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor, a member 
of several State commissions, and a veteran in 
the active work of the union. His defeat was 
a surprise to Labor and political leaders on 
the entire Pacific Coast. 

Next came the defeat of 1. X. Hylen, for 
more than twenty years secretary of the 
Alaska Fishermen's Union, which is another 
constituent body in the International Seamen's 
Union. Hylen and Scharrenberg are vice-presi- 
dents of the international. Hylen had advised 
the acceptance of a wage reduction of about 
10 per cent. The new secretary had to sign 
an agreement for a much greater reduction in 
wages. 

From the decisive manner in which the new 
leaders, whose identity has not yet become 
known to the general public, have defeated the 
old, it may be inferred that there is widespread 
dissatisfaction with the tactics which Furuseth 
and his associates have used in meeting the 
combined attack of the Shipping Board and 
the shipowners' associations during the present 
year. There is a demand for alliances with 
other unions, and for industrial unionism of 
an effective kind. Thus far, however, the new 
majority has shown no detailed plan of reorgan- 
ization beyond its effort to get an alliance 
with the transport unions. 

In an interview with Chairman Lasker of 
the Shipping Board before his departure, furu- 
seth charged that Government secret service 
men and private detectives employed by tin 
shipowners bad gotten into the seamen's local 
unions to foment discord and to promote the 
quick expenditure of all union funds. Lasker 
denied knowledge of am such spying and inter- 
ference, but said that if any Government 



agents were found to be doing these things 
they would be withdrawn at once. 

Evidence that such secret operatives are at 
work has not been presented thus far. 

The information furnished by Laurence 
Todd is usually interesting, varied, and 
reliable; but in relation to certain asser- 
tions in the foregoing he has been griev- 
ously misinformed. 

The statement to the effect that the 
newly elected secretary of the Alaska 
Fishermen's Union "had to sign an agree- 
ment for a much greater reduction in 
wages" is altogether false. 

There arc matters contained therein 
that touch us personally, and the fact 
that the present editor of the Journal is 
mentioned, shows that the snake thai 
spread the poison left a trail. 



COFFIN SHIPS 



The unusual characteristics of shipping 
interests are continually manifested 
throughout the ports of the seven seas. 
Everywhere is observed the same greed 
for profits, the same contempt for law. 
and ruthless disregard for human lives. 
The Australian Worker says : 

"One of the hardest fights in the inter- 
ests of humanitarianism has been that 
against the avaricious shipowners — espe 
cially those who run coffin ships around 
the coasts of Australia, and to and from 
and among the islands in the adjacent 
seas. 

"The Navigation Act, after years of talk, 
and compromise, and delay, was eventually 
put into working order, and, in some sort 
of half-hearted and apologetic manner, 
into commission. 

"But now, presumably in response to in- 
sidious pressure from easily-guessed quar- 
ters, the Federal Government, according 
to the Minister for Customs, Massy 
Greene, has decided that the transport 
conveniences that certain people and pos- 
sessions now "enjoy" are not to be preju- 
diced by the application of the Act! 

"Thus we have the spectacle of certain 
\essels (that had a law specially pleaded 
for-, and passed, to deal with them and 
their conditions) exempted from the very 
law they necessitated! Could anything 
more ludicrously tragic be imagined? 

"Fancy any other law-breakers being ex- 
empted from the logical penalties of their 
crimes! Fancy the burglar, the pick- 
pocket, the spieler, and the garrotter be- 
ing exempted from what ought to be, and 
are. the just consequences of their crim- 
inalities ! 

"And even the immunity of the last- 
mentioned category of criminals wouldn't 
be so bad ; for whereas their operations 
arc carried out wdiere, proportionately and 
comparatively, only a few isolated posses- 
sions or lives are endangered, the cheese 
paring policy of the shipowners, with its 
attendant life-preserving inadequacies, 
jeopardizes whole complements of lives, 
and makes a specialty of providing un- 
healthy and unhappy conditions for the 
unfortunate employes. 

"Altogether, it is a vilely damnable de 
eision on the part of the Federal Govern 
niciil. lint, then, members of the Minis- 
try seldom, if ever, sail as passengers, 
and never function as employes, in the 
worst of the ships that surge through the 
seas with, metaphorically speaking, hell 
for the employes' accommodation, and a 
grinning skull at the prow." 



| ( Union 






LAKE DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III 355 North Clark Street 

K. B. NOLAN, Secretary 
THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 
Phone S 

BUFFALO, N. V i; HANSEN, Agent 

55 Mam Street, i neca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O K. J. SULLIVAN, Agent 

1501 Columbus Road 

MILWAUKEE. \\ , BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich WM. DONNELLY. Agent 

410 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON. Agent 

74 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y Agent 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

CONNEAUT, O Agent 

992 Day Street. 

TOLEDO, Ohio S. R. DYE, Agent 

618 Front Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 Agent 

3308 East Ninety-second Street 

6UPERIOR, Wis WM. EDGEWORTH, Agent 

724 Tower Avenue 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. V 71 Main Street 

IS. CONWAY, Secretary 
ED. HICKS. Treasurer 
Phone Seneca 48 

CLEVELAND, O 819 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE. Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 410 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y... 35 West Eagle Street 

J. M. SECOHD, Secretary 
Telephone Seneca. 896 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O _ 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, O 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 1 59 CWy Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 671 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 66 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third 8treet 

SAN PEDRO, Cal „ P. O. Box 87 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box S14 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

TTLE, Wash 1016 First Avenue, South 

P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore Room 21, Ainsworth Buildln« 

SAN PEDRO. Cal 613 Beacon St.. P. O. Box 674 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 86 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203. Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 68 Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

SEATTLE, Wash. ! I Seneca St.. 1'. O. Box 4Z 

ASTORIA, Ore P O. Box 118 

DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE. Wash. SI Seneca Street 

PRINt i: RUPERT 

KETCHIKAN, 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA. Ore I'. O. Box US 

FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL, Seen 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal, 16« Steuart Street 

Phono Sutter 2205 
STOCKTON, Cal. Labor Temple 

FISH TRAP PILE DRIVERS AND WEB WORKERS 
OF PUGET SOUND AND ALASKA 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



After being on strike for ten 
months, the Plumbers' and Steam- 
fitters' Unions (if Nashville Tcnn., 
have won a complete victory. 

The Coopers' Union of Los An- 
geles has negotiated an agreement 
with the employers which provides 
a wage increase for the employes. 

Secretary Morrison of the A. F. of 
L. has denied reports that the Fed- 
eration has suffered a loss of 750,000 
members during the industrial slump. 

The United Textile Workers are 
planning a campaign to establish the 
forty-eight-hour week and increase 
wages of textile workers in Southern 
mills. They will also work for abo- 
lition of child labor, and will de- 
mand sanitary working conditions for 
thousands of workers. 

The open shop program was insti- 
tuted last week in the plants of the 
five big packers. No immediate re- 
adjustment of wages or working 
conditions is contemplated, accor- 
ding to the operators. The new 
system is condemned by Secretary 
Morrison of the A. F. of L. as a 
"reaction to the stone age," as it 
practically means right of counsel is 
denied to employes in matters of 
importance to the workers. 

Approximately eight thousand union 
oil workers went on strike last week 
when the California operators re- 
fused to consider an agreement which 
would include the Government as a 
third party. The men were willing 
to accept a reasonable wage cut. 
but they want an agreement stabiliz- 
ing wages for a definite term. 

Judge Landis has granted a re- 
hearing of the arbitration proceed- 
ings in which he served as arbitrator 
and cut the wages of workers in the 
building trades of Chicago about 
\2'/> per cent and changed their 
working conditions. Roth the Build- 
ing Construction Employers' Associ- 
ation and the Associated Builders 
have protested against his decision 
to rehear the question. 

The 68,000 workers in the navy 
yards have framed a protest to the 
President and the Secretary of the 
Navy against the wage award of 
the Navy Wage Roard. This award 
cut the wages of the Government 
employes in navy yards from 10 to 
_'<l per cent. The workers declare 
that the In aril paid no attention to 
the economic facts adduced at the 
two-week hearing of the case. 

Charging that they were wrong- 
fully and without just cause dis- 
charged from the ship in Yokohama, 
April 28, although they had signed 
on for the round-trip voyage, four 
members of the crew of the steam- 
ship Wenatchee of the Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company's transpacific 
passenger service filed suit in the 
U. S. District Court at Seattle 
against the Shipping Board for a to- 
tal of $367,157. alleged to be due 
them as wages, traveling expenses 
and for maintenance. 

A second suit to prevent officials 
of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America from 
revoking the charter of a «San Fran- 
cisco union was brought in the Su- 
perior Court. This time, E. E. Wat- 
tles, claiming to represent Carpenter.-.' 
Union No. 22. brought suit against 
organizers and the international or- 
ganization, asking that they be re- 
strained from revoking the local's 
charter and from disturbing the 
union's property. Recently a similar 
action was brought by members of 
Carpenters' Union No. 483. 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofnee. letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
11 or have their mail forwaded 
during that period, they should notify 

\_<nt to hold mail until arrived. 
Abrahamsen, Haer- Augusta. J. 

Ian Andersen, Hans 

Aekerstrom. Oscar Akselsen, George 
Aberg. Einar Andersen. Marius 

Anderson, A. C. Anderson. Ingemar 

Anderson, Cornelius Adrian, P. 
Antonsen, John Andersen. D. E. B. 

Aholnlnen. Edvord Alonso. Nicolas 
Andersen. Arthur H. Andersen. Pete 



Blaagaard, Anton 
Baker, Joe 
Boyle. J. 

Bjorkkvist, Ragnar 
Berg, H. J. 
Bussek, Joe 
Bratt. F. H. 
Bengtsen, Oscar 
Belving, Chr. 
Bergstrom, Charles 
Brumpet, Walter 

Church, A. J. 
Carr, Robert 
Cherin. C. 
Canning. James 
Chamberlain. L. C. 
Cederstrom, B. 
Carlson, Louis 
Chekan, W. 
Coleman, W. 
Clark. Roland 
Carrigan, E. C. 

Dunne. Jack 
Dyrland. Erlck 
Dayraon, Bert 
Donovan, Jerry 
Davidson, J. M. 
Davis, Harold 

Erikson, Sam 
Erikson, Einar 
Erikson. Lars 
Ekengren, Olaf 
Erikson. Nils 
Forbes, Frank M. 
Fugman. Arthur 
Franzell. Arthur 

Gabrlelsen, G. C. 
Gustafson, Oscar 
Grau, Axel 
Graudin, Ed. 
Gulllksen, Amandus 
Henriksen, Carl 
Halley. Wm. 
Hagen. Harald 
Healey, Geo. S. 
Halvorsen, Karl 
Hansen. Martin 
Holmen, K. 
Harper, Earl 
Hoed, Hans 
Heggum, Louis 

Johnsen, Ingvald 
Jansen, R. 
Johnson. Dick 
Janson, John 
Johnson, Ellas 
Jenson. James 
Johanson. Matt 
Johnson, Chas. A. 
Johanson, Johan R. 
Johnson, Anton L. 
.lorgensen. Angel 
Jacobs, Henry 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Kallo. K. 

Karlson, G. A. -1190 
Krastln. J. 
Kragstad. A. E. 
Hoppen, Oluf 
Kristiansen. Aarnt 
Knudsen. Andrea 
Larsen, Sigurd 
Lambert, Ed 
Larsen, Ludvik 
Lohne, E. 
Laskinen. Fred 
Livingstone, Ed 
Larson, Rudolf 
Lucy, James 
Liohtenberg, Ben 
Lauritsen. P. E. 
Ljungstrom, Oscar 
Lee, L. 

Millard. Frank 
Martinsen, Ingvald 
Macleod. Alex 
Molder, John 
Monroe, N. S. 
Mengert. Fred 
Moore, Thos. 
Margaard. H. 
Nilsson, N. J. 
Nilson, A. H. 
Nolan. Janus 
Nelson. Swan 
Nilson, Carl -801 
Nurse. A. L. 
Nilson. Adolf 
Nergaa-rd '"V 



Back. Chr. 
Burton, Arthur 
Bowen. W. F. 
Berge. Krlstian 
Bauer. W. H. 
Bach. Herman 
Budd, Percy 
Bruce. Albert 
Burnett, Norman 
Behring. Chr. 
Bozarth. F. P. 

Church, A. J. 
Curry. H. M. 
Christlanson. W. 
Campe, F. T. 
Corrlgan, B. B. 
Christensen, Hans 
Carlson, Martin 
Caputo, Samuel 
Campbell, John R. 
Carlsen, Erlck 

Disney. Robert 
Dickensen, A. 
Dampsey, Geo. A. 
Drennan. W. 
Delzell. W. W. 
Danil, E. R. 

Eklung, Victor 
Edvordsen, John 
Elsted. John 
Edvords. Louis 

Frog, Hartvlg 
Fox. A. -862 
Fltzpatrick. Edvin 
Fredrickson. F. W. 
Gangsrod. Karl 
Gjerde. K. O. 
Gulllksen, Gust 
Gulbransen, Peter 

Harms, F. 
Hefling, Jack 
Halmin. Wm. 
Hahnqvist, Einar 
Hansen, S. P. 
Harper, E. G. 
Hlnton, Henry 
Hultard. Wm. B. 
Hill. Nestor 
Hansen, Nils 
Holt. Ole 
Johnsen, Ludvlg 
Johansen, Arthur H. 
Jaoobson, M. 
Johnson. Ed. -2294 
Johanson, Olof K. 
Johnson. G. A. 
Jacobson. Torgils 
Johanson. Henrik 
Johnson, Alex 
Jensen, Wilhard, E 
Johansen, Carl 
Jones. A. H. 
Johnson. Gust 

Kllkeary. Frank C. 
Karren, John 
Koernbach. Hugo 
Kristensen. John 
Kellman, B. 
Kristiansen, J. A. 

Larsen, Emanuel 
Larsen. E. -1345 
Lauritsen, P. E. 
Leeween. A. W. 
Landlung, Chas. 
Lauritsen, Jack 
Larson. A. 
Lawersen. L. 
Lleson. Wm. 
Lynum, A. M. 
Lutton, Theod 
Lyngues, Chr. 
Lund. Eric 
MIchalson. Harald 
Musch. Chas. 
Mann. Albert 
McPherson, James 
McLean. Angus 
Mclntyre. L. 
McCoy, J. L. 
McMullen. J. 
Nelsen, Peter 
Nelsen, Ross 
Neelsen. H. J. 
Newland, Ernest 
Nyhagen. Julius 
Nicholsen. Ben 
Nurken. Herman 
Nelsen, A. B. 



Nelson, Werner 
Nelson, P. A. 
Nllsen. Harald 
Ovist, John 
Osterberg. C. V. 
Optedal, Caspar 
Pendville. N. 
Pedersen, J. M. 
Petersen, BJarm 
Parker, Bert 



Nahlnan. F. 
Nilsen, N. P. 

Olsen. John H. 
Owens. J. W. 
Ogga, Ed 
Pedersen. Emil F. 
Pabus, Laas 
Pedersen. Ole 
Pedersen, O. J. 



Pederson. C. E. -1286Permln, J. C. 
Pedersen. Herman Pedersen. E. P, 



Quandt, A. 
Rasmussen. Chr. 
Rod. S. 

Rasmussen. Peter 
Rebour. Frank 

Sandin. P. 



Paulsen. O. E. 

Rorvik. Chas. 
Randle. C. W. 
Reilley, Ralph 
Ross, Herbert 
Ronberg, Edvard 
Stetson, Henry 



Sater. P. Pedersen Schrage. P. W. 



Skag, Otto 
Saderberg. Albln 
Scarpa. E. 
Stiff'.er. Roy 
Sherrin, E. 
Strand, Charley 
Skaa«, Paul 
Shipley, A. M. 
Steiner, F. 



Schler, T. J. 
Schlrmbel, Rup 
Sarv. H. 
Smith. Aug. 
Scarlett, J. 
Swansen, Axel 
Salonen, Ivori 
Salmar, K. 
Stockburger, C. 



Stenberg, HJalmar Stidham. C. W. 
Sitts, La Verne Samuelsen. Hugo 



Simonsen, S. 
Sandstedt, E. H. 
Seyfried, M 
Thorsen. V. 
Tasel. John 
Torwirh, Hans 
Tangeros. L. 
Thomsen. Peder 
Theysen. Arthur 
1'nwin, H. 
Wheeler. G. W. 
Welkens. Henry 
Wlger, John 
Welson. E. W. 
Wilson. Walter 
Westerlund. Albert 



Semberg, John 
Swanson. J. -1013 
Sandvik, H. 
Teneson, J. 
Trlpplett, C. J. 
Thorsen. Hans 
Tugmen, Arthur 
Thorsen. Hans 
Torstinsen, A. J. 
Volley, P. 
Wold. Stadlus 
Ward. Wallace 
Wahlstrom. Eric 
Wallin. A. 
Walker. A. A. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Alaska Fishermen's Letter List. 



Anderson, Hllding 
Andersen, Ole 
Albertsen, John 
Audrey. A. Belle 
Brumfilt, Walter 
Bround, Geo. A. 
n. Ernest 
Clark, Bruce 

in, E. 
I i.ni ret, Salvatore 
Fli in. Knut. 

im, R. J. 
Gronning, T. S. 

iurg Gust. 
en, Emel. 
Jacobsen, Olal. 



Janssen, M. N. 

Johnsen. John 
Johansen, F. C. 
Johanson, Fritz. C. 
Johnson, A. Emil. 
Karlkrsmoli, Steve 
Larsen, Theodor A. 
Larsen, William 
Olsen. Johan Oscar 
llissmussen, Peter 
Roni, E. 

Tack 
Skooba, Nils 
Sohultz. Walter 
Schaffer. Paul 
Smith. R. 
Tannison, Teter 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, E. F. 
Anderson, Olaf 

-1118 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Charlie 
Alhers, George 
Barton, M. 
Bohm, Aug. 
Carman, P. 
Fostervold, Kasper 
Gustafson. J. 
Harris. John T. 
Molmberg. Trans. 
Johannessen. Alf. 
Johannessen, Jonas 
Jackson, John 
Jesperson, Martin 
Lepp, Alex. 
Laisel, Harry 
Nielson, Chr. 
Nielsen, Hans 



Newington, Fred 
Olsson, Chas. 
Pedersen, Wilhelm 
Peterson, John 
Parker. Arthur 
Rengsderf. W. 
Rawley, Bruce 
Rubens, Chas. 
Randle, C. W. 
Saro. W. 
Smith, C. Johan 
Smith, FrPrt 
Smith, Emil 
Srhant. II. 
Tonsfeldt, John 
Torjesen, Gunwald 
Vejvada, Frank 
Vetters. Oscar 
Westerberg, Cn rl 
Wilenius, J. T. 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Andersen, John 
Dominguez, Joseph 
Jarvinen, Oscar 
Klingenberg. John 
Low, G. 
Mat son, P. 
Marvis, John T. 
Nelson, Andrew B. 



Rengsdorf, W. 
Robinson, L. 

one, W, !•'. 
Landberg, John 
Skully, John 
Smith. John 
Smith. Carl J. 
Tomphson. T. 



Honolulu Letter List. 



Freltas, l>anl. 
< lustavson, Erlck 
Kant, Hermann 

I Robt. 

Lauber, Emil 



Olson. Carl W. 

Willardsen. w. 
Whltecross, Jas. 
Weetvlck, Tngolf 
: man, YV. H. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



DENTIST 

Hours: 9 a. in. to «:30 p. m. 

EUGENE PAYNE, M.D., D.D.S. 

At 3 Fourth St. Mezzanine Floor 

California Theatre Building 
Market St. Corner Fourth St. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1— Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1890 
MENS CLOTHING. SHOES, HATS 

and FURNISHING GOODS 
108-110 Main Street, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS. 

GLOVES. OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street • Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



UNION LABEL 
SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

NYMAN BROS. 

Bee Hive Store 

Men's Furnishings, Hickory Shirts. 

Hats. Oil Clothing. 

Home of the Union Made 

Co-operative Shoe. 

302 So. F Street, ABERDEEN, Wash. 

on the Water Front. 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 
Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 

1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



James Kenney of Philadelphia, last 
seen in Pennarth, Wales, is inquired 
for by V. McMahon, 96 Plain street, 
Providence, R. I. 6-1-21 



Phone 263 



>» 



"Niels and Charlie 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Anders Teodor Turesson, born at 
Gothenburg, will please notify The 
Swedish Firemen's Union, Gothen 
burg 7, Sweden. 11-24-30 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Anderson, H. M. Lund, Olai 

1495 Tjobelos, Jose 

Albertson, John Luce, Paul 

Anderson, Sam Ligovski, Joe 

Anderson, Chas. A. Laursen, Max O. 

Andersson, Gust B. Luhrs, Ludwig 

Arnesen, Isack Lorenzen, Jean 
Anderson Harold M Loven, C. 

Anderson, B. A. Lauritzen, Ole 
Andersen, J. N. 

Andersson, O. G. B. McCart, Albert 

Anderson, Gunner McCormick, Harold 

Anderson, Harry B. Mr-Mullen, Dan 

Alto, John-1349 McCloskey, W. 

Anderson, CharleyH McBridge, George 

McVay, Prank 

Bersin, Jacob Miller, Fred 

Boom, A. E. Miller, E. 

Bordeaux, E. T. Muller, Frederik 

Boe, Ivor Malmquist, Gus 

Mattson, Maurice 

Carr, R. W. Machen, L. E. 

Cameron. Robert Mize, J. H. 

Carlsen, Dick Melaa, Peder 
Crawford, Thomas 

Cormie, William Neville, Thomas 

Craig, Theodore Nelson, Charlie 

Catherwood, Horace Nielsen, S. 
Clementsen, Alt 

Cristen, John Olsson, P. 

Carroll, Kenneth O'Donnell, Jas. 

Carr, Robert R. Ossante, Anthony 

Calcoff, Sam Olsen, Henning 

Cordeau, Thomas Ovist, John 

Cords, W. A. Olsen, Ferdinand 

Cumalet, John H. Onnu, Tobias 

Olsen, Ole-1329 
Deaver, A. 

Dyrland, Erick Pastorillen, H. K. 

Dreyer, J. O. Paton, J. P.-2082 

Daunt, C. Persson, Bernhard 

Peterson, O. E.-1558 

Evertsen, Olaf Petterson, Axel 
Eliassen, Emil 

Evensen, Alex Rodowitch, Harry 

Eliasson, George Rogers. Robert G. 

Eriksson, Julius W. Roman!, Gaetano 

Erickson, J. E. Rengsdorf, "W. 

Evans, John Rokow, Steve 

Evertsen, Olaf Runska, Henry 

Runge, Robert 

Forsberg, Alfred Reidel, Gus 

Fernandez, Chas. Ruygrok, Dick 
Fritze. Harry 

Fors, Ellis Sutert, Ole 

_ „ , „ Stenberg. Alt 

Galleberg, M. Steinbrick, Paul 

Gregovich, Mark Sandblom, H. 

Gray, A. Sorensen, Edwin 

Gomez, F. Smith, Albert 
Gregersen, Kristian Sandback, Geo. 

Gaide, Wm. Sund, Lewis 

Gunnerud, Ulrik Stewart, Elder 

Schierenbeck. Karl 

Hecker, W. Sandberg, N. A, 

Harvey, Earl S. Sether S. J. 

Hall, Robert E. Smith, 'Albert 

Hickey, John Schellhous, Wm. 

Hellman, Max Sunde, O. 

Horton, Geo. A. Sandstrom, Hjalmnr 

Hanlon, William Selzer, Max 

Hanson. Harold Samuelsen, H. M. 

Hurley, Michael stensland, Paul 

Heino, A. Shaeffer, Ray 

Horner, Ambrose Stenros, John 

Harbst, John-2905 Sakariassen. Bernh 

" Seagren, B, 

Jacobsen, Tom Seaman, Fred 

Johansen, Johan Schmidt, H. T. L. 

Johnson, Gunmar Svendsen, Geo. E. 
Johnson, F. K. 
Jorgensen, J. 
Johnson. Tom 
Jensen, Paul 
Jonassen, Johannes viets, C. L. 

Jensen. Kristian Verney, A. 

Jorgensen, Jens G. Visearra, Oscar 
Janson, Jack R. 

Johansson. Albert Woide, John 

Jonessen, Fred Wilson, John 

Johnson, C. A. Winkelman. Otto 

Johnson, Oscar Williams, Frank 

Johanson, Ed Wennerquist, Anton 

Jones, Arne M. Wilhelmson, Karl 

Johanson, N. A. Wright, Charlie 

Jorgensen, Knud Westura, Willie 

Jensen, Marius Williams, Irving 

Jomo, John Winsten, Gustaf 
Johansen, J.-1432 

Young, William 

Iwersen, W. Young, Carl 

Young, Ragnar 

Killatt, Daniel Zetbury, Harold 
Koff, Michael 

Knudsen, Andrew Registered Mail 

Kopatz, Oscar McVay, Frank 

Kaartinen, Sam Murphy, Edward 

Kallio, Frans A. Viets, C. L. 

Koski, Juho Silla, Joseph 

Kalnin, Ed Braest, K. 

Lodersen, John Haierup, Axel J. 

McCormick, Harold 

Lill, Karl Nixon. Leonard 
Lindroos. Oskar Packages 

Lehan, C. Campbell, J. R. 

Larsen, Olaf J. Hennum, Christ 

Lueder, Wm. Costley, F. L. 

Lund, F. Stenensen, A. 

Lindholm, Chas. Hansen, Oscar-2171 



Seamen! Have You Got a Copy of Axtell's 

Book, "Rights and Duties of Merchant 

Seamen"? 

It contains a digest of the maritime and statutory law which any seaman 
can understand. 

It is an education as to your rights as well as your duties. It will protect 
you wherever you are. It deals fully with the subject of wages, breach of 
contract of hiring, salvage, personal injury, maintenance, consul's duties 
and powers, authority of the master and officers and duty of the seamen 
to the ship and master; digest of your rights under the Constitution of 
the United States. Enclose a dollar in an envelope and we will mail you 
a copy. Reduced rates in quantities. 

RIGHTS & DUTIES PUBLISHING CO. 

9 State St. Iver Olbers, A. B., Sales Manager New York City 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 
Peaceful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
Disputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS* UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLLIS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE, General Se«retary-Trea«iref 




INFORMATION WANTED 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Thornlund, John 
Thompson, Maurice 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Frank Hines, John Ryan and 
Harold Wood, who claim to have 
been forced off the SS. "West Que- 
chee" in France, December 14, 1919, 
please report or communicate with 
me at once. S. B. Axtell, Nine State 
street, New York. 4-20-21 



Old Reliable and Up-to-Date 

TOM WILLIAMS 

EXCLUSIVE TAILOR 
FOR MEN 

28 Sacramento Street 

Phone Douglas 48 7 4 



I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crews of the follow- 
ing vessels. In most cases, action 
has been commenced. In some cases 
the funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney with 
me. "Anacortes vs. Barge 95," 
"Alabama vs. Brandywine," "Bell 
Haven vs. Riverside Bridge," "Bak- 
ersfield vs. Eastern Sailor," "Beau- 
mont vs. Baladan," "Chester Valley 
vs. Campbello," "Cacique vs. Carta- 
gena," "Dachet vs. Hutchinson," 
"Delavan vs. Pennsylvanian," "Delana 
vs. Nevasco," "Devolente vs. Winova 
County," "Elkton vs. Cold Spring," 
"Eastern Glen vs. Andrew Jackson," 
"Silverado vs. Lake Faristan," "East 
Indian vs. Lake Flag," "Eastern 
Shore vs. Boston Bridge," "Eastside 
vs. Volunteer," "Eastern Sun vs. 
Jekyle," "Federal vs. Monamac," 
"Gypson Prince vs. Queen Makon- 
ing," "Glenwhite vs. Wathena," "H. 
F. Morse vs. Capulan," "Hadnot vs. 
Allentown," "Hickman vs. Faraby," 
"Intan vs. Putnam," "Ida vs. West 
Hepburn," "Lake Strabo vs. Lake 
Franconia," "Louisiana vs. Tallac," 
"Lake Freezeout vs. Liberty," 
"Mesholee vs. Johnson City," 
"Moosehausic vs. Jene L. Summer- 
ville," "Monasses vs. Eastern Queen," 
"New Briton vs. Braebrum, "Orcus 
vs. Johnson City," "Pawlet vs. Yana," 
"Pratt vs. Irish," "Shannock vs. 
Devo," "Sacanac vs. War Hagara," 
"Sutransco vs. Swedco," "Tollard vs. 
Gunston Hall," "Quabbin vs. Far- 
nam," "Tunica vs. Neponier," "West 
Katan vs. Flavel," "West Harcouver 
vs. West Hemmetite," "Western 
Hope vs. Impico," "Western Comet 
vs. Nordica," "Western Queen vs. 
Cripple Creek," "Westford vs. Osha- 
loosa and Osakis," "West Segovia 
vs. Wampum," "Western Comet vs. 
Nesco," "Western Pride vs. West 
Silkirk." "West Maximus vs. Moose- 
hausic," "Western Front vs. Silver 
Queen," "Wonahbe vs. Consort," 
"Cold Spring vs. Lycoming," "Be- 
noni vs. West Hargrave," "West 
Harcouver vs. Ozaukee." S. B. Ax- 
tell, 9 State St., New York City. 



Mrs. Hattie McClellan, 510 James 
Street, Seattle, Washington, is desir- 
ous of locating her son, George L. 
McClellan, age 21; last heard from 
about year ago in Norfolk, Va. 
3-9-21 



Mrs. Theresa Moran, 313 Rich- 
mond street. Providence. R. I., is 
anxious to ascertain the where- 
abouts of her brother, Dan Gillis, a 
member of the Firemen's Union, last 
heard of in Ashtabula, Ohio, about 
four years ago. Any information 
will be greatly appreciated. 4-27-21 



Carl Tossavainen, a former mem- 
ber of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, a native of Kuopio, Finland, 
age 33 years, last heard from on the 
Pacific Coast in February, 1913; 
any one knowing his whereabouts 
will please communicate with Busi- 
ness Manager, The Seamen's Journal, 
San Francisco, Cal. 12-1-20 



Mrs. John M. Eshelman, 601 Un- 
derwood Bldg., San Francisco, is 
anxious to ascertain the whereabouts 
of Friend McHarvey, a native of 
California, age 40, last heard from 
while in Alameda county this spring, 
1921. 2-16-21 

Emil Nagard, 2438 Folsom street, 
San Francisco, California, is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of his 
brother, Joseph Louis Nagard, a 
member of the Marine Firemen's 
Union of the Pacific, last heard of 
at San Francisco, January, 1919. 

8-3-21 



Mrs. Jeremiah T. Murphy, 39 Gecr 
Street, Glens Falls, N. Y., is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
son, Timothy J. Murphy, last heard 
of in March, 1919, at Burkeburnett, 
Texas. Those knowing his where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
his mother. 8-31-21 



J. Latvala is anxious to ascertain 
the whereabouts of Arne Wartiainen, 
a native of Finland. Anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts, kindly commu- 
nicate with the above named at 
Box 306, R. F. D. 2, Kirkland, Wash. 

4-20-21 



Ole Toreson, born in Trondhjem, 
Norway, age about 30. His cousin, 
Tryggve Hagen, would like to hear 
from him. Address, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Fore Grandinetti, of Campias, Bra- 
zil, brother of Cesaro Grandinetti, 
who died at sea, can recover $119.21, 
his distributive share of the estate 
of said Cesaro Grandinetti, by com- 
municating with Attorney Silas B. 
Axtell, 9 State St., New York, N. Y. 

4-13-21 



|lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIM 

V/ori'1's V/orI«>rs 
Iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

The British Trade Union Congress 
adopted by an overwhelming ma- 
jority a resolution protesting against 
the fulfillment of the Government's 
naval building program, and endors- 
ing the November Conference in 
Washington for limitation of arma- 
ment. 

Unemployment is still a serious 
factor in Scandinavia. The percen- 
tage of members reported idle in 
June by certain trades unions mak- 
ing returns to the Norwegian Cen- 
tral Bureau of Statistics, was 16.1, 
as compared with 14.7 in April, and 
0.9 in May, 1920. 

In spite of the fact that their 
plans to affiliate with the Third In- 
ternationale were defeated at Lille 
by a very small majority, the ex- 
tremist element of the French labor 
movement have set out to reverse 
the decision arrived at by the Gen- 
eral Confederation Convention. 

The extension of protective laws 
for workers in Austria fix conditions 
of service for women employes in 
conformity with the Washington con- 
vention. Before and after confine- 
ment a period of rest must be 
granted without loss of employment, 
and further concessions are made in 
regard to time allowed to mothers 
for nursing their infants. 

At the annual conference of the 
General Federation of Trade Unions 
(Great Britain) a scheme was con- 
sidered for extending activities and 
increasing the influence of the Fed- 
eration. It was agreed that, in order 
to counter the influence and attacks 
of employers' organizations, it is 
essential to carry on active propa- 
ganda. It was decided to set up a 
department of statistics, and for in- 
dustrial and commercial information. 
Two organizers were appointed for 
immediate action along these lines. 

The Australian workers are rapidly 
bringing their plans into operation 
for the establishment of a chain of 
daily labor newspapers throughout 
the various States. The scheme is 
based upon a co-operative plan. Gen- 
eral management of the papers is to 
be vested in a board of directors to 
be elected by the unions holding 
shares in the enterprise. Each union 
is requested to assess adult members 
to the amount of $2.50 each, and 
women and juveniles $1.25, for the 
purpose of raising a working fund. 
It is proposed that all the labor 
papers now in Australia merge into 
one company and establish a bureau 
for distribution of information and 
everything necessary to the mainte- 
nance of a complete daily labor press 
system. 

The French Chamber of Deputies 
have voted a supplementary credit of 
twelve million francs for the National 
Unemployment Fund to meet the 
needs of the latter half of the cur- 
rent year. In making his proposals, 
the Minister of Labor recalled the 
fact that the principal credit voted 
by the Chamber for the year had 
been fourteen million francs, and that 
a subsequent supplementary credit of 
4,540,000 francs had been granted. 
These provisions had proved inade- 
quate, and up to July 1 more than 
15,500,000 francs had been expended, 
the monthly disbursements to the 
municipal and various departmental 
unemployment funds being about 
2,5()(),(X)0 francs. An endeavor has 
been made to connect the funds 
closely with the public employment 
exchanges, \ special effort had bi 
made to obtain situations in agri- 
culture. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



in the pi 

.itliin Hi 

un- 

i the time 
A true bill tirried by 

I the 

June. 

h a blanki 

timed 

id II. 
\V. Mine 

To the turn 

I with a 

- leans 

under 

tlu-ir inability 

way in 

■ 

.1 de- 

which in- 

i men in 

cord. 

been told 

• 

.roll and 

n jail 

"ages. In 

■ 

ipating in 
the police 
nee, arrn 
• I thi 
tim while as a 



Member of the Feaeral Reserve System 
And Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 



SAVINGS 



(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 



COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets .......... 

Deposits 

Capital Actually Paid Up 

Reserve and Contingent Funds .--... 
Employees' Pension Fund 



$71,383,431.14 

67,792,431.14 

1 ,000,000.00 

2,591,000.00 

357,157.85 



Elliott, Arthur W. 
Enberg; E. 
Fischer, Chas. O. 

'berg, T. 
Fosse, H. 

nberg, G. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hood, Alex, 
.'olianessen. A. -2277 
Keith. J. 

Klemmetsen, Sigurd 
Lange, Walter 



OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNT, Vlce-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashlsr 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

A. H. MI'LLKU. Secretary 

WM. I"). NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYKR, Manager Mission Branch 

W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT E. A. CHRISTENSON 

TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

L. S. SHERMAN WALTER A. HAAS 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorney* 



_ _ _ , . Murphy, T. F. 

San Francisco Letter List ; ESSJSfcg* 11 

Mourners whose mail Is advertised In ] 5J°^t!ST' - 
these columns should at once notify 
B. A. Silver. Business Manger. The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clav Street. San 
Francisco. Cal., to forward same to the 
l>ort of their destination. 



Monsen, Chas. 
Murphy, Eddie 

Nalai. Henry Do 



Schaeffer. George 

V. 
Schibon, Paul 
Schreff, Paul 
Schroeder. C. F. 
Schultz, George 
Scho< nfeldt, C. 
ler, C. M. 



Mors at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only ami .vill be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 



N-Isnn. John G -1366Simmering. C. I 
NU-kerson, Phillip Shapiro, Joseph 
Nielsen, aii. v. K. Stevens, Th 



■ I, Anfinn 
r, Austin 
nisson, P. 

• IV 
Ham 

lohn 
■-. Walter 

.-1526 

Sivert 
W. 

-on, Chas. 
-10U 

-on, C. J. 

on, Ingard 

■ k. August 

in, Herman 
Edward 
Austin, Tom 

ib, L. 

i. .1. 

B. J. 
. Chas. P. 
th, Einar 
. Konrad 

:mar 
\Ym. 
i 'all 

n. Martin 
Brink, Harold 
R. E. 
r, Chas. E. 

Carlson, Chas. F. 
in, Julius 
n. S. A. 
n, Conrad 

r nt 
. R. 
, Carl -1601 
on, Gustav 
-77G 

<:. V. 
.. Mariano 
11. C. 
II. P. 
Christensen, Einar 



nan. Wtt 

i. Aksel M. 
I lansen, Antonius 
i lansen, Joi 
I lansson, Martin 

■ !. W. 

en, C. H. 
Hanson, O. -2099 

. George S. 
lleathorne, G. 
Heldal 
Hendrlcksen, J. r. 

rid. Halvor 
. Reinhold 
Hildama, S. P. 
1 Corton, i ; o. A. 
Hobby, Win. 
Holmbcrg, Mauno 
Huber, (.'has. L. 
Ernest 
Hurlong, Thos. 
i luberti, Emil 

n, A. 
iretsen, I. 
[ngwaldsen, A. B, 

iVelSOIl. Iver 

1 1 fred 
on, K. Hj. 
Jameson, J. E. 
Jensen, .\. I. 

en, John 

II, Al. M. 

R. 
Johansen, Walter 
Johansson, Rudolf 
Johansson, W. 

-1334 
Johnsen, Norman 
Johnson, Carl W. 
Johannsen, Carsten 

Johnson, Axel 
Johnsson. C. J. 

-1566 
Jonson. H. Erick 
Jon< s, M. 

-en. Emil 
Juniper. Foster P. 
Jurikson, Julius 

Kaktin, Ed 
Karlsson, A. J. 
Kasik, August 



Chrlstinson, WilliamKamm, John 

n, Demetrion Karlson. William 



\ ictim in 









ii A 
; . Frank 
y, Allen 
Corieh, Fred A. 

t'l'ctll, 

letsky, F. 

Albert 

I i. E. 
K. .1. 

k O. 
I rygve 

r, E. 

Carl 
nil, John 
en, Thorleif 
t. A. W. 
Ellis, Frank L. 
el, l >. 

i :/.. Joseph 

\ 1 fred 

I. ill. G. B. 

1 1 ugo 

I lenning 

B. H. 
Ford, Dough 
Foster. C. 

e. Harald 

'.as. A. 
nar 
Fuller, Everett 

i >han 
Gabrielsen, Lasr 

in. Claude 
Groth. Fred 

Halley, Wm. 



i 'has. M. 

Klatt, Herman 

Klemetsen, Erling 
Klieniann, Otto 

Koeliila. Demetrius A 
Kristoffersen, H. O. 
Krause. Arthur 

a. Martin 
Lasdin, H. 
Laine, Gustaf 

•i, FlnvaH 
Larsen, Kaare T. 

e, Julian 
Lesklnen, John 
Leikanger, Beny 

Rli hard 
Llesen, Wm. 
llrger 
Lindenau, E. 

Iroos, Fred 
Little, M. i:. 
iror 

I, Wm. J. 

"dor 
Lucey, James 
Luoma, Waino 
Lyman, T. 

Mahoney, F. J. 
Magnusson, Carl 

Maison. A. G. 
Mackenzie. Ed. 

Macdonald, i Donald 
UacKenzle, Alex 
Makl, Wm. 
Mel lermott, T. B. 

Mel i.i mutt. Wm. 

McCormick, H. W. 
E. McFarlan. Carl F. 

McLean, Angus 

McLean. Donald 

MJeyer, llenrv-3352 

Melln, M. M. 
D. Meza, J. 

Mello, M. N. 

P. 

Mlttel, <ilaf 



Nllsson, Axel-1174 

I '. R. 
Nilsen, Nils M. 
Nllsson, Gustav 

An 
Nlcolaisen 
N'lxon, L, 



Stiniey, Chas. 

I rand, Bror 
Sunsberg, K. K. 
Swensson, EL- 

Sidoroff, N. 
Ancker Sidorof. S. 

Sorens.n, N, M. 



■i. Edward -">447 

Nordstrom, H. Speller I 

Stall. Ralph M 



Nunstedt, Paul 



Ogren. V. E. 

' Milsson, Johannes 

' ilavsen, Otto B. 
1 Usen, Alf. 
Olsen, A. II. 
< Hson, I [an 
olsen. Ole J. 
a. Albin 
Oraerhowsky, Leo 
Oraya, Enrique 
1 'sman. J. 
1 isses, Andrew 
1 'stlund, John 
1 c tern, Aksel 
1 >wens, Leo 



Sternberg. Hj. 

Stewart. J. H. 

Stone. M. C. 



X. 



I'alm, Axel 
I'ankratz, B. 
i 'aterson, Kenneth 
Paulsen, Axel J. 
; ii. Hans 
Peder 
Peters, J. M. 
Pett, Richard 
Pettersen, R. s. 

link G. 
Petterson, C. V. 
Pedersen, Eysten 
Pihlplk, C. 
Pihlstrom, R. J. 
I'itali, Tony 
rilklnton. Homer 
Pope. Bert 
Powell, J. E. 
Prebensen, 



Tanum, Helge 
Tennenbaus, Harry 
Terry, J. E. 

A ink. II. S. 

1020Thoinpson, Gus 

Thomson, Geo. II. 
Thorne, A. W. 
Thorsen, Carl 
Tlngstrom, A. R. 
Tjersland, Sverre 
Toffor, A. 
Tomlln, Edward 
Tourtellot. W. J,. 
Tosh. James M. 
Troughton, Wm. 
Tvede, Nick 
Tyson, W. 



Vaguer, John 
Vaidez. William 
Vanquest, Ernst 
VdKooy, S. F. F. 
Veckenstedt, Wm. 
Verhoef. II. 
Vlncenzo, Robt. 
his, Ejler 



Rankin, Orrin 
Rasmussen, Aksel 
Reb. Walter A. 
..it, Mike 
i. Custav 
• n. Johan A. 
Relesgord, Hillm. 
Riedel, i lustav 
Kingman, C. W. 

Rodowitch, Harry 
Rogenfeldt, John 
Rosenberg, Louis 
Roth, C. M. 
Rundslrom, Albert 



Walters, Herbert 
Walker, A. 

Watson, A. 
Waleiiius. Peter 
Wehde. Fritz 
Nicolai weis. Bruno 
Wendel, Emil 

erde, John 
W.nl, A. de 

land, Fred 
Weistex, Willi 

Whallcv. A. J. 

Wijkander, Eric 
Wllhelm, Erick 

Williams. R. II. 

Wo... i, Richard 
Worman. Albert 
Wolter, John 
Woodley, C. R. 



Ziehr. Ernst 



PACKAGES 

Bergqvist, Johan W.Clark. Fred W. 
Hower, U. R. Carpenter. Harold 

Christensen, Richard Dommelen, G. 



Ljungqvist, HJ. 
Larsen. J. -ZU12 
Maloney, J. J. 
Murphy, T. 
O'Connor. John J. 
Olsson, Carl J. 
Rusch, R. H. 
Sebring, James E. 
Stein, X. 

Sidoroff, N. 
Taylor, James B. 
Wagner. R. H. 
Weishaar, Rudolph 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Torsten Hanson, kindly commu- 
nicate with Capt. Gust. Johnson, 
Center St., San Pedro, Cal. 
His last address was Hotel Oliver, 
722 Harrison St., S. F. About nine 
years ago he was employed by Mat- 
son Navigation Co., S. I". His father. 
Hanson, of Gothensburg, Swe- 
den, wishes to hear from him. 

9-21-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Charles Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, last heard of in 1916, 
address P. O. Box 673, Juneau, 
Alaska. His father, Peter Iverson, 
is anxious to hear from him. Kindly 
communicate with A. Johnsen, P. O. 
Box 65, Seattle, Wash. 7-20-21 



Mrs. Margareth Watson is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
husband, John Watson, who left 
Seattle on board the S. S. "Jadden," 
and was then heard from in June, 
1920, on board the S. S. "Quaker 
City," at Philadelphia. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts, kindly 
communicate with his wife at 3420 
Thirty-ninth avenue S. W., Seattle, 
Wash. 6-22-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Joseph Bert Riese, a native of 
Cleveland, Ohio, last heard of De- 
cember 1, 1919, in Savannah, Ga., 
when he shipped on the SS. "West 
Apaim," please communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Joseph Riese, 4120 
Bailey avenue, Cleveland, O. 

6-29-21 



Brother of Carl Wohmar Holm, 
a native of Isle of Nargem, Es- 
thonia, born 1888, last heard of at 
Newport, Monmouthshire, England, 
on an American ship in 1916. Kindly 
communicate with Erik Kristian 
Holm, care National Sailors' and 
Firemen's Union, 9 Dubois street. 
Antwerp, Belgium. 7-27-21 



Phone Kearny 6361 Union Tailors 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 
50 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PhoK 



(^1379 Your Old Friend JOE W E I S S 
WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

92 FOURTH ST. nr. MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Union-Made Shoes for Men Exclusively 

Repairing Done While You Walt 
We use only the best leather that the market affords 




PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 
268 MARKET STREET 

Colducted by Capt. Chas. Ehlera 
Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Garfield 2457 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNI-SHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 

Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



GEO. A. PRICE 



SAYS 



'BUSINESS IS GOOD. YOUR MONEY'S 

WORTH AND YOU KNOW IT. 

THERE IS A REASON." 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Office — Phones — Residence 

Garfield 1649 West 1400 

Habla Espagnol and Parla Italians 

DR. J. D. REENG 

Genito-Urinary Diseases a Specialty 

Office Hours: 11 to 12:30 a. m. and 

3:30 to 7:30 p. m. 

709-710 Phelan Blda., 760 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two Individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, N«ar Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Thos. A. Jones, 720 N. Lancaster 
avenue, Dallas, Texas, is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of his son, 
Thos. Lenard Jones, a member of 
the Marine Firemen's Union of the 
Atlantic. 3-9-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Olaf Erling Hendrikscn, a native 
of Norway, age 33, last heard from 
on the Atlantic Coast, kindly com- 
municate with his brother, Albert 
Hendriksen, Aalo Post Office, Chris- 
tiansand, Norway. 6-1-21 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CTJGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5.00 

UNIFORMS and SUITS, TO ORDER and READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 



!'!:;!■; 



36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



AT THE DENVER CONVENTION 

the American Federation of Labor took official 
notice that 

— huge losses were suffered by workers last year 
through purchases of fraudulent and worthless 
securities. 

Convention Resolved 

— to call upon the United States Government "to rid 
the country of fraudulent schemers" 

— to assist the Government to bring to the attention 
of the union members the advantages of buying 
Treasury Savings Securities, issued in denomina- 
tions of 25c, $1, $5, $25, $IOO, $IOOO 

Buy Them Through Your Post Office or Bank 
Government Loan Organization 

Second Federal Reserve District 
120 Broadway, New York 




lie Si S 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



quAlfr D C See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
O 1V1 KJ rw S^ IV O box jjj wn ich you are served. 



■^J^lfl 138(1 &±V^3&5dfZ2 I 
Issued by Authority 01 the Cigar Makers International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

a^* ■■ *^> TrU'td r?.«-M»«i ik-. k .^-„, — ,..«,< ,nihi\ boi rn»« tmo mi(J« W» llfSlUUSS WfXWl 

in WMruitm* de*ol»d ^ " 
1. OWi Ikntansn.'i 



TcSJV 2hiS de\id\ti. lhittli4C«>Mieoiit*n«.Jimi 
SVfcl iwnecnof ih[ 6c*«ku*twiKitB»»iio>ut uni 



1 union or Aiwiici in orjinuitna demoted h»th»id- 
»a»W tiie MOBM MAUBIAUnd iNlliliCl UAl WUIMl Of TXt 



Uvm Ciwu to ill ynoUfi 
/jfj MWiataaMUWM tru. 1 ibt' 



ttwouqloot tlit wotld 

«' oil U punlMd •cunlf'O* * l«Ti 






try. » ' 



*TA«? 



Amtriti I 



Mows from Abroad 





Headquarters For Dependable Shoes 

FOR MEN 

Agents for 

W . L. Douglas 
Walk Ease 
\ Just Wright 

\ PPIfT'C 58 THIRD STREET, S. F. 
^^ I lllvLl \J Between Market and Mission 



A rich gold discovery is reported 
from Glen limes, New South \\ 
and a rush for (he new digging 
set in. 

Report . .nii.ua show (hat 

nearly 40,000,000 people are affi 
by the Unprecedented famine; 15,000, 

000 are stan ing with at least 1 .< 
(Hill doomed to die. 

Mi>s Kersten ren, for n 

years a labor leader in Sweden, has 
been elected al Gothenburg as mem 
her of the lirst chamber o.f the 
Sw edish parliament. Miss He 
gren w ill be the in s.t w ojnan to hi >ld 
1 seat in tins chambi 1 

I In' schooner " VI ajestic," com- 
manded bj Captain Haines, with 
thirty-two passengers and crew fi 

1 leme'i ara foi Barbados, is belii 1 1 d 
to have been lost in the hurricane 
which swept Barbados • 
September 8. 

I In- nego't iatii nis ci inducted by 
Paul II- mail- , tin- Belgian deli 
!<■ the League of Nations, 
Lithuania and hi ques- 

tion ol thi oceu-pied citj of Vilna, 
will be passed on to the Lea 

Council, as Poland hi I Eo 

1 . 1 1 agreement submitted 
by Lithuania. 

Uprisings in India continue, and all 
the Government buildings in Nilani 
bur, in t he Malabar district, ai 1 
ported to have 1 ieen burned by 'the 
M'oplah rebeK. The bridge between 
Nambad and Nilambur has been de- 
stroyed, thi statement dei lared, add- 
ing (bat tlii rebel bands are being 

■ in ;ued. 

Geneva reports thai suggestions 
tending to bring aboui mediation be- 
tween Turk ej been 
made in Leagin ■ ch bj pei 
1 iiimi 1 ted v, u ! ek delegation. 
League ol aj no notice will 
I en of thi 1 pri ipositions unl< 
nted as a formal demand foi 
inten ention. 

Approxin 10,000,000 bushels of 

■ ram have passed through the port 
of Montreal so fai this season, sel 
ting a new record. About 4(1 pi 
cent of the total was American gi 

R ( cent shipment i bei am'e so heavy 
that the ( lanadian Pa'i ific and Grand 
Trunk Railroads ann'oum < ci ' estric- 

foi protei tion of Canadian 

shippi 

The British steamer "Port Kem- 
bla" reports that time signals were 
ed from Manila, Philippine Isl- 
ands, when the vessel was 
miles away from that port on the 
high seas. Twelve hours later time 
signals were al ■ - d from 

Melbourne, Australia. The 1 ompai I 

son of these two time signals 1 1 

Manila and Melbourne gave sails - 
fai tory chi onbmetei corrections, thi 
" Port Kembla" 1 1 poi ted 

l In Italian Government has in- 
tervened to stop the invasion 
parts of Vustria bj Hungarians ac- 
cording to reports received Ironi 
Rome. Word b.is been received in 
Rome in. m Paris that the council 
of ambassadors has now accepted 
the I i.ib.ni point ol \ iew so that 
joint action to stop the Hungarian 
1111.1 ion appears ti ured. 

Eighteen - ars of American food 
have reached Moscow from 
Twenty-three nun - on the 

, are necessary lo al - 

ford a balanced ration ' and male 

0] id kitchens 

ill MOSCOW, besides shipping rations 

to Kazan and Samara, the firSI 
pla 1 , in the Volga region v 
kitchens will be opened. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



ill 

Horse Cabman ("to driver of forty 
horse-power car, who has bumped 
into his horse) — All, yer blinkin' cow- 
ard! Forty against one! — Evening 
News (London). 



Mother — Those little playmates of 
yours look rather common, Bobbie. 
1 hope none of them swear. 

Bobbie — Oh, some of 'em try to, 
mother, but they ain't much good at 
it.— Life. 



Mrs. Brown — I hear the vicar 
thinks your daughter has a real ge- 
nius for reciting, Mrs. Smith. 

Mrs. Smith — Yes. All she wants, 
he says to me, is a course of elec- 
trocution, just to finish 'er off like. — 
London Opinion. 



Lady Visitor — But you're wrong in 
thinking the birds a nuisance. They 
devour the insects and caterpillars. 

Mrs. Subbubs — I'm glad you told 
me. It's a great consolation to know 
that they eat my fruit merely for 
dessert. — Life. 



Teacher — You remember the story 
of Daniel in the lions' den, Robbie? 

Robbie — Yes, ma'am. 

Teacher — What lesson do we learn 
from it? 

Robbie — That we shouldn't eat 
everything we see. — Yonkers States- 
man. 

Nurse — Why, Bobby, you selfish 
little boy! Why didn't you give your 
sister a piece of your apple? 

Bobby — I gave her the seeds. She 
can plant 'em and have a whole 
orchard. — Kingston Standard. 



"Dicky," said his mother, "when 
you divided those five caramels with 
your sister, did you give her three?" 

"No, ma. I thought they wouldn't 
come out even, so T ate one 'fore I 
began to divide." — Edinburgh Scots- 
man. 

She was telling an acquaintance 
about her girl friends. 

"Yes," she said, "my friend Maud 
is only twenty-live, but she's been 
married three times. And all her 
husbands have been named William." 

"You don't say!" replied he. ''Why. 
she must be a regular Bill collector!" 
— Xew York American. * 

An American visiting the Sydney 

zoo was rapidly getting the goat of 
his guide, by exclaiming of every- 
thing shown that "they had 'em 
much larger in the States." Finally 
they came to an old man kangaroo 
which the American had never seen 
before. Asking the guide what it 
was, the Yank was astonished to re- 
ceive the reply: "A grasshopper, you 
blooming bounder; now see if you 
can beat that." 

Edith Wharton, the writer, told 
this war story: 

"The American wounded were 
being brought in from the second 
Marne battle," he said, "and a fussy 
American woman in a khaki uniform 
and Sam P.rowne belt knelt over a 
stretcher and said: 'Is this case an 
officer or only a man'' The brawny 
corporal who stood beside the 
stretcher gave her a grim laugh 
and said: "Well, lady, he ain't no 
officer, but he's been hit twice in the 
innards, both legs busted, he's got 
two bullets in both arms, and we 
(Implied him three times without his 
lettin' out a squeak, so T guess ye 
can call him a man.' " — Seattle Argus. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Comer Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Tills OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
,.l CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
n demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has onlv the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be. even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well Informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 

500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Hezzanlth'a, Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's Compasses, 
Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sounding Machines, Sextants, 
Parallel Rulers, Pelorus, Dividers, Nautical Books, Charts 
and Tide Tables. Fully equipped department for the 
repair and adjustment of chronometers, watches and 
clocks. This work Is in charge of an expert of American 
and European experience. All work guaranteed. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds arc Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 
Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



Seamen! Watch for Developments 

See Our Weekly Reports Posted in All Union Halls. 

I have said that I would never be attorney for shipowners, until the 

seamen were shipowners. One of the purposes of my visit to Europe this 

summer is to acquire knowledge as to shipping conditions abroad and 

particularly to ascertain with what degree of success the seamen of 
Italy are ooerating ships. 

Any seamen, who, with a view to becoming shipowners some time, are 
willing to form "a Seamen's Society for Savings" and will pledge to save 
one-fourth of their wages over their board and lodging per annum, said 
savings to be put In a depository that they themselves may select, please 
jommunicate with the undersigned. 

Silas B. Axtell, 9 State St., New York City 




Qames Ji. Sorensea 



SILVERWARE » CLOCKS 

for wedding presents. Large stock to select from. 

£cJWkmCa 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

715 Market St., between Third and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco 

All Watch and Jewelry Repairing Guaranteed 

Gifts that last by the thousand 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Established 1874 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want your Panama blocked 
right I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 






BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

762 VALENCIA ST., San Francisco 
Phone Park 9401 



OUiiBUSTEH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ARGONAUT S' 








FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 




A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXXV, No. 4. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1921. 


Whole No. 1772. 



BIN' 



Unncnvnlnsedl WorlfetoM CondlMoims Baur©dl h>y IinivosttS^atlniniM Boa^d 



The following report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation, between the Canada 
Steamship Lines, Ltd., and the Sailors, Firemen 
and Cooks' Union of Canada, reveals the miser- 
able conditions under which these unfortunate 
workers are compelled to exist. It also proves 
beyond doubt that the steamship operators are 
determined to take full advantage of the un- 
employment situation to degrade and ruthlessly 
exploit their employes: 

Montreal, Canada, July 28, 1921. 
To the Honorable G. D. Robertson, 

Minister of labor, Ottawa, Ontario. 

Sir: — The undersigned members of the Con- 
ciliation Board authorized under the Industrial 
Disputes Investigation Act of 1907 in the matter 
of a dispute between the Canada Steamship 
Lines, Limited, employer, and certain of the 
employes, being firemen, oilers, wheelsmen, 
watchmen, deckhands, cooks, stewards, etc., 
members of the Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
Union of Canada, under date of the second day 
of .May, A. D. 1921, have the honor to submit 
the following: 

1. After the first preliminary session of the 
Board, it was found that a great many difficul- 
ties faced it, principally among which was the 
difficult of securing witnesses. The seamen at 
tliis season of the year are scattered over the 
Great Lakes and canals, and it simply meant 
a slow process of digging up material evidence 
and bringing the same before the Board, hav- 
ing regard for the convenience of the witnesses 
and the non-interruption of the movement of 
traffic. Unfortunately no set presentation of the 
case for the men as regards witnesses had been 
arranged by the Secretary of the Union, Mr. 
Gray, and the Hoard had to act in conjunction 
with him by advice and many consultations to 
bring before the Board material and necessary 
evidence. 

2. In addition to securing evidence under 
oath, the Board considered it advisable to make 
a personal inspection of different vessels, a list 

hnl, i. hereto attached, for the purpose of 
confirming to their own satisfaction the state of 
affairs existing on said vessels. This was done 
on the occasion of two trips to Port Colborne 
where advantage was taken of the fact that it 
was a meeting place of the Upper Lake boats 
and those engaged in the canal traffic to Mon- 
]. At this point also, through the energetic 
ts of the local business agent, Mr. C. 
Crombie, many witnesses were secured and their 
evidence taken on the occasion of each visit. 
Further investigations were made by the Board 
by numerous interviews with gentlemen who 
are familiar with the different phases of sailor 
life on the Great Lakes, and valuable informa- 
tion was thus secured by informal discussions. 
Observations on the Evidence 

3. Th( satisfied itself by examination 
of the Secretary of the union, Mr. Gray, that 
conditions absolutely existed justifying the ap- 
pointment of a Board, i. e., that on or about the 
11th day of April, 1921. after the new schedule 
on wages had been announced by the Canada 
Steamship Lines, Limited, there was great 
dissatisfaction and the seamen employed by 



them at Midland, Ontario, being members of 
the union had threatened to go on strike, but 
at a meeting held on the above date, at which 
there was a fair attendance of at least seventy- 
five representatives of the men, it was decided 
to wait until a Board of Conciliation had been 
secured in accordance with the Act, and, in 
the meantime, that all hands should be in- 
structed to resume work. At this time at Mid- 
land there were nine boats of the Canada Steam- 
ship Lines, Limited, laying up ready to go into 
commission at the opening of navigation carry- 
in^ a total crew of approximately 190 men, 
and in the event of their striking, eighty odd 
license men would be directly affected. At 
Port Colborne there was also a number of boats 
laid up awaiting developments at Midland. On 
hearing of the decision of the Midland meet- 
ing that was accepted by the union at Port 
Colborne. In the event of a strike by these 
men, other unions affected would be the Long- 
shoremen's, Elevator Handlers' and other em- 
ployes engaged in the handling of traffic at the 
Upper Lake ports. 

The decision of this meeting was communi- 
cated to all points and apparently the under- 
standing was that they- were to join up at the 
company's rates of wages and carry on until 
an award was made by the Board which was 
being applied for under the Act. The negotia- 
tions which were entered into between the of- 
ficials of the union and the Canada Steamship 
I ines, Limited, Montreal, were carefully gone 
into and copies of all correspondence are here- 
to attached. This has already been submitted 
to the department prior to the appointment of 
the Board. The question of the membership of 
the union was also gone into and it was dis- 
covered that there were some twenty-one hun- 
dred members on the list in good standing, 
also the matter of the authorization of the 
Secretary, Mr. Gray, to act for the union, was 
verified. 

In the course of the examination of vairous 
witnesses as regards the taking off of coal 
passers, which was one of the complaints 
made to the department, other complaints and 
grievances ware disclosed, among which were 
the following: 

(a) Lack of first aid. 

(b) Lack of ventilation in sleeping quarters, 
bel ow ' 

(c) Paying off of crew by time check. 

i,l i i treatment of sick and injured 

sailors, 
(el Sanitary conveniens i 
I i i The undermanning of ships. 
(g) Prevalence of venereal diseases. 
(h) Lack of recreation. 
( i ) No certificate of discharge. 
( j ) Discrimination against union men on the 

part of certain slippers. 

mpliance of the Shipping Act in 

referenci to the signing of the articles. 
Mi Desirability of the appointment of 

Shipping Masters at the inland ports. 
I'm) Notice oi di ■< harge, etc. 

den paid at a monthly rate for single 

trips of less than twenty-four hours. 



(o) Lack of protection around the gears of 
deck winches. 

4. The above subjects were gone into very 
exhaustively and every effort was made to get 
at the actual facts. After consideration the 
Board has concluded to make the following 
findings in respect to each subject: 
Lack of First Aid 

fa) This complaint was discovered to be ab- 
solutely true. While some time back, somebody 
fail authorized and provided medical chests or 
boxes containing essentials for first aid and 
medical comforts, through lack of proper su- 
pervision, nobody apparently considering it 
his duty to look after this branch, the whole 
arrangement gradually fell down until the 
present time when scarcely any ship has a 
vestige of the system left, or material to use in 
case of accident. This point was brought to the 
attention of the local superintendent, Mr. Grant, 
of Toronto, who, it appears, must have com- 
municated the matter to the General Manager 
in .Montreal, because when the latter was 
examined he said that he had recently ordered 
complete boxes containing first aid appliances 
and medical comforts with strict instructions 
that the same were to be looked alter by the 
certified officers. The General Manager admitted 
the subject having been neglected. The Board 
is of the opinion that the instructions do not 
go far enough, but that orders should be issued 
that certain officers of each ship should take a 
course in first aid which, it is imagined, could 
easily be done during the winter when the 
ships are laid up. The complaints leading up 
to this investigation were various men having 
cited instances of hardship anil danger to their 
lives by their inability to get lii%t aid attention 
until they reached a hospital at the first port. 
Lack of Ventilation in Sleeping Quarters 
Below Deck 

(b) The Board finds that the complaint as 
to lack of ventilation in sleeping quarters be- 
low deck is justified on many ships, and recom- 
mends that steps be taken especially in the old 
vessels in commission — to have this grieva 
remedied without delay. It would appear thai 
the idea seems to prevail on many ships that 
all the ventilation necessary is a port hole, no 
intelligent study being made as to the circula- 
tion of the air. 

Paying Off of Crew by Time Check 

(e) This practice should be abolished. While 
it may work in many cases without any hard- 
ship, at the same time the I!' mm] see, no 
reason why any member of the crew being 
p. i id off should not receive his cash. If the 
captain's allowance id' cash is not sufficient, 
which we understand is now $2(X(, the amount 
Should be increased. 

Careless Treatment of Sick and Injured Sailors 
(d) Sick sailors arc at once sent to a hos- 
pital, but unless the sickness has Occurred 
through the fault of the ship, the sailor is 

ibliged to pay his own hospital fee and medical 
attendance. There is no sick mariners' dues on 
the inland lakes the same as at sea ports. 

Although this matter has been under discussion 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



time, no n arrived 

,, i hat there 

nountable why the same 

mid not be put into effect as at the 

lard. 

In the case of injured sailors, the masters 

have ive an immediate report 

of all accidents even minor ones— to thi 

then filled out, directed to 
the V - Compensation Hoard of To- 

■■■• A the 

is made and claim duly pre- 
I to the Canada Steamship I ines, I united, 
in due course. Cases under the Quebec Work- 
men's Compensation Act are somewhat differ- 
ent, the responsibility of the Company being 
determined by the courts instead of by a 
lent claims are insured 
against by the company. The Hoard is of the 
opinion that some instructoins should be issued 
to the seamen denning exactly what their rights 
are in respect to and accident, and the 

taken, as the Board has met 
v. lure the seaman has met with 
mishap and apparently through ignorance or 
neglect oi ceived no redi 

Sanitary Conveniences 

t does not appear to have 
iion that it should. On the 
rp inspection is made 
dail , nger con- are 

d, but th would appear 

; itter of dis- 
ild easily be enforced. 
The Undermanning of Ships 
(ti Under the present law, a ship can clear 
an inland port with a en too small 

to , ithout danger. The Hoard recotn- 

PS be taken to go into 
this question so ' would be per- 

mitted to char without an adequate comp 
men1 n . This is a somewhat technical 

:l ,,d the Board would prefer to shut 
t|u . sures inaugurated 

nically conversant with the sailing 
hips. 

Prevalence of Venereal Diseases 
(<r) should be taken to see that 

men thus afflicted are not allowed on board. 
Medical inspection seems to he very lax and 
little is done on the discovery of the 
jnfectioi te the diseased man. 

Lack of Recreation 
able complaint has been made 
that the men have nothing to do in then- 
spare mo While the working hours are 
long and of time >- taken in 
ping, at the same time tb to be 
; ,1 for 1 1 periodicals. 
No on is made to supply these and, 
generally speaking, there is no place where 
men can enjoy small games such as cards, 
draughts, etc. 

Certificate of Discharge 
(i) Tin- complaints as to the absence of 
this certificate have been justified. It is con- 
sidered that in the interest of both the ships 
men, these certificates should be given. 
It would assist the employer in having a 
record of the employ ne extent do 

away with the employment of nun who are put 
on ana tarn out to be no good for 

wan t o The way things are at 

present men drift around in an aimless sort of 
way no behind them, and very little 

to I rward to. The ( 1 record marks 

exhibited 

to the 1 of l )r ' de "y tne P os " 

irs of th 
Discrimination Against Union Men on the 
Part of Certain Skippers 

mplaint was justified, and the Gen- 

r. Enderby, has admitted in his 

,. V1I : ! least one officer had been 

reprima liaving col- 

and insisted upon the surrender of union 

union men who were being 

employed. 

Lax Compliance of the Shipping Act in Refer- 
ence to the Signing of the Articles 
( ki It has 1 .red that these articles, 

ned in the presence of the 
- at the port of embarka- 
n, are frequently, and in fact in most c 

,n board the ship often many days after 

the employe ha! aboard. A rigid in- 

uld be mad to see that the terms 

the Shiping Act are carried out, because it 

is in the interest both of the employer and the 

employe. 

Desirability of the Appointment of Shipping 

Masters at the Inland Ports 

This subject came up frequently during 

tin tion and the COl opinion 

be that a shipping master, duly 

i : nment, would 

be an advai lieu of a shipping master, 

as well. This gives a seaman an opportunity 
of getting any : >1 and en 

him to get a jt- m in any i ase where 

he imagines he ha a grievance. The practice 
is that after the complainant has 
made a complaint in the usual channel, through 
his superiors, and no action is taken, the 
Ct is washed out. There seems to be no 



question as to the advisability of shipping 
masters at Ocean ports, and similar officers 
if almost equal benefit at inland 
Notices of Discharge, Etc. 
Complaint was made as to notices of 
neral practice being theo- 
retically to -even days on an employe 
being discharged, or his leaving the service. 
In practice this does not work. The employe 
leaves whenever he sees fit at a port of call, 
and the officers of the ship seem to be able 
to dispense with his services without noti 
company has just issued printed notii 
touching this matter, a copy of which is en- 
ed herewith. The interpretation of the 
ship's contract should not be unilateral but 
should work both ways as regards notice 
required. 

Men Paid a Monthly Rate for Single Trips 
Less Than Twenty-Four Hours 
(ui Complaints came before the Board of 
men being paid at monthly rates for single 
trips of less than twenty-four hours. It is 
recommended that these men be paid at shore 
rates for similar work. 

Lack of Protection Around the Gears of 
Deck Winches 
I'his is not generally done. A number 
of vessels were examined and it was found 
that the machinery was dm ind 

lent it..' idents in bad weather especial- 

ly. A rigid inspection of all machinery should 
tiade forthwith and steps taken to have all 
parts such as .mars of deck winches, 

Withdrawal of Coalpassers 
5. Lastly, as regards the cm if the 

withdrawal of th iers, the nds 

that this action entailed additional work and 
hardship in some cases. The utilizing of the 
forward crew to assist the firemen has un- 
fortunately in many cases engendered con- 
siderable friction and has not tended to facilitate 
the smooth working of the engineroom, which 

so desirable. The company recognizes in 
some cases the necessity of pi is in the 

cage of the "Collingwood," the District Su- 
perintendent having recommended that passers 
be reinstated on this boat. A thorough study 

some of the other boats — which are known 
among the seamen as "hard" boats should be 
made as the placing of passers would eliminate 
much of the trouble which now exists between 
the forward and after crews. The Hoard in its 
investigations have discovered that on many 
ships there were continual changes in the per- 
sonnel of the crew, in some cases the en 
having changed completely three times up to 
date, .<\\i\ can only come to the conclu- 
that the conditions, especially in the fire hole, 
are such that the men have thrown up their 
jobs even at the risk in these days of unem- 
ployment of failing to secure work on shore. 
As before pointed out, the conditions of the 
sleeping quarters, sanitation, ventilation, and 
hard work, have, in the opinion of the 

ird, been the cause of so much transient 
employment. 

Wages 
stion of wages paid on those 
ships is a difficult one to tackle, and the Board 
ha> gone into the subject with great pains and 
submits the following remarks: 

rally speaking, the wages paid sailors 
rward and after crews 
found to be below the remuneration of similar 
i occupations, both skilled and unskilled labor, 

the wages of a wheelsman for example, 
in 1915, during the eight months of service 
on the Great Lakes, which is the maximum 
mployment in the year at the scale 
as submitted to thi , he would earn 

$336 i ird for the peril id I •■ ere 

a married man, and a large proportion of these 
vs are married, he would of necessity have 
' to support a family on this sum. If he were 
fortunati i to get two months' inter- 

mittent ent, as we believe is the aver- 

would make, say $100, giving him 
, a total of $436 for his year's work. The Labor 
zette for 1915 gi\es a fair cost of ordinary 
living for a small family as $719.16. This 
ans that he would have at that time to 
deprive his family of what is usually con- 
sidered as , He has nothing to go 
on with for a supply of clothing for himself 
and family as it certainly appears that he was 
in very bad financial straits and was quite 
evidently underpaid. 

In 1920 the wheelsman's wages had been 
raised up to $880 for the season. At tra- 
iler rate of wages paid on shore, if he got 
employment, he may have earned $220, making 
• whole year's earning The Labor 

Gazette for that year shows that the cost of 
living for a small family was $1212.12. It will 
then be seen that although his condition was 
improved over 1915, he still is not in a satis- 
factory financial shape to meet the require- 
ments of his family. Examination of witnesses 
pursuing a similar occupation on shore, say 
motormen, hoisting engineers and so forth. 
shows that the shore standards are much higher 
1 that the shore job is a much better one. 
Of course the position of a single man is 
much better than that of a married man in as 
. much as he has his board free and on the 



other hail a rule to keep up a 

Id, but the evidence taken would show- 
that a very large proportion are married men 
and that man) single men have contributions 
to make for tin of their immediate 

families and In fact there were only 

a few who did not have claims upon their 
of some sort in this respect. 
In the case of the lower ratings, conditions 
an- proportionately worse. On shore jobs where 
■ ,n of the Canadian climate certain 
trades remain inactive through the winter, 
higher wages have always been allowed to the 
trade so affected. For instance, this applies to 
the case of stone mason and bricklayer, who 
have always had a higher rate than carpenti 
whose work was not atsly affected by 

climatic conditions. In the case of the crews of 
the Canada Steamship Lines, Limited, boats 
1 we believe on other lines) this aspect of 
loyment has never been considered. The 
heavy reduction of wages at the beginning of 
this season put the seamen into a pecuniary 
, ondition as bad as 1915, which was bad enough. 
Many v -.ere examined who formerly 

led a seafaring life and had be(*n employed on 
the lakes. Without exception they all stated 
that they would not under any circumstances 
return to sailing. being given, sur- 

roundings wi better, hours were more 

opportunity for enjoyment, 
ay, and ivironments generally, 

evidence in this respect was most emphatic 
The [Joard is of the opinion that the re- 
duction was much too swi ter care- 
ful consideration believe that a ten per cent 
redu ould be more ile, especially 
in view of the fact of the slight percentage 
in the i l st of living as given 
by the Labor Gazetti schedule 
of wages should I from the begin- 
ning of the season of 1921. flu- reduction made 
this year in the pay of the masters and engi- 
neers was only ten per cent. It is difficult 
understand why only a ten per cent reduction 
made in their cases and marly thirty per 
i in the cases of the rest of the crew, unless 
it be that it was anticipated that there would 
be considerable difficulty in replacing the cer- 
tificated staff, whereas in the latter case, it was 
lected to take full advantage of the wide- 
spread unemployment of labor on shore. It 
might be noted on reference to the exhib 
that the American schedule is much higher than 
the Canadian at the present time. 

An analysis of the pay rolls of the Canada 
Steamship Lines, Limited, indicates that large 
sums of money have been saved by the re- 
ductons made in their rates of wages. At the 
same time it is brought out in evidence that 
no reduction has been made in passenger 
rates and a small reduction in freight rates, 
which are well maintained, and in addition, the 
evidence of the General Manager would go to 
show that the boats are operated at much less 
t, more especially in respect to coal, so far 
mtside of labor are con- 
cerned. In investigation as to the causes of 
the raise in rates during the period of 1915- 
1920. it appears that it is due almost entirely 
to the scarcity of men and to the high rates 
paid ashore. Mr. Enderby testified that when 
lis scredules were being made the company 
had solely in view what they could afford to 
pay. but did not consider, in any case, the 
-i living imposed upon their men. 
It would appear to be evident that the re- 
duction this year was made with the object 
in view of taking advantage of the abundance 
men and ally through- 

out the territor, ompany from 

which their nun are recruited. 
Conciliation 
7. The Hoard has made several efforts to- 
wai On the 11th instant a 

between Mr. NorcrOSS, the President, 
ami Mr. Enderby, and the Hoard took place 
at the company's bead office, when it was em- 
phatically stated that the union would not be 
re, - nothing to conciliate, 

further, that it was the intention of the 
ike a further reduction. This 
was confirmed under oath by Mr. Lnderby at 
the the 12th instant, 

wh ted that he had positive instructions 

from his management to take the action above 
mentioned, and while he. as General Manager, 
was always willing to listen to complaints from 
men individually, no n as would be 

held with officials of the union. A further effort 
was m '.ally by Colonel Hums as rep- 

resenting the Canada Steamship Lines, Limited, 
on the Hoard, with Mr. Lnderby on the 20th 
instant, without effect. Lvery assistance was 
in Mr. Enderby— it may be noted — in furnish- 
the Hoard with statistics and such in- 
rmation as was asked of him. 
We have the honor to be, sir, your obedient 
servants. 

RUEMAN BLACK, Chairman. 
G. E. BURNS, Member. 
D. L. KENNEDY, Member. 



It is quite in keeping with the fitness of 
things that compulsory arbitration should find 
its highest acceptation in the land of the 
boomerang. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



FOREIGN INTRIGUE EXPOSED 
(Continued from last week) 



Even more illuminating than the address itself 
is the series of events which followed its de- 
livery and its insertion in the Congressional 
Record. The president of the International 
Mercantile Marine Co., P. A. S. Franklin, at 
once took issue with some of the statements 
made by Senator Jones in the address from 
which 1 quoted. Thereafter, on January 25, 
1921, the Senator from Washington placed in 
the Record three agreements of the Interna- 
tional Mercantile Marine Co. with the British 
Government, dated, respectively, August 1, 1903, 
October 1, 1910, and September 2, 1919. These 
agreements will be found in the Record of 
January 25, 1921, pages 2041-2042. 

On January 25, 1921, the Senator from Wash- 
ington placed in the Record three agreements 
of the International Mercantile Marine Co. with 
the British Government, dated, respectively, Au- 
gust 1, 1903, October 1, 1910, and September 2, 
1919. These agreements will be found in the 
Record of January 25, 1921, pages 2041-2042. 

Turn to the American members on the board 
of the International Mercantile Marine Cor- 
poration and note for a moment the significance 
of their railroad connections. 

The J. P. Morgan interests, which have al- 
ways been dominant in the affairs of the 
International Mercantile Marine and are now 
represented on the board by J. P. Morgan and 
Charles Steele, hold directorates in the follow- 
ing railroads. I give only those in which Mr. 
Morgan is a director. 

He is on the board of directors of the 
Central Railroad of New Jersey; Lehigh Valley; 
Lehigh & Hudson; Erie; Northern Pacific; 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway; South- 
ern; Chicago Great Northern; New York; Sus- 
quehanna & Western; Pere Marquette; Phila- 
delphia & Reading, eleven in all. 

The Guaranty Trust, represented on the di- 
rectorate of the International Mercantile Marine 
by Charles II. Sabin, president of that company, 
holds directorates in the following roads: 

Michigan Central; Pittsburgh & Lake Erie; 
Lake Erie & Western; Toledo & Ohio Central; 
Kanawha & Michigan Railway; Cincinnati & 
Northern; Monongahela Railway; Rutland Rail- 
road; New York Central; Wabash; Southern 
Pacific; Illinois Central; Texas & Pacific; - St. 
Louis Southwestern; Missouri Pacific; New 
York, Susquehanna & Western; Gulf, Colorado 
& Santa Fe; Santa Fe, Prescott & Phoenix; 
Toledo, St. Louis 6k Western; Atchison, Topeka 
& Santa Fe; Erie; St. Louis & San Francisco; 
Seabord Air Line; Union Pacific; St. Joseph & 
Grand Island; Oregon-Washington Railroad & 
Navigation Co.; Baltimore & Ohio; Illinois 
Central; Alabama Great Southern; Nevada 
Northern; Copper River & Northwestern; Chi- 
cago Great Western; Pennsylvania; Long 
Island; New York, New Haven & Hartford; 
New York, Ontario & Western; Pittsburgh, 
Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis; New York, 
Westchester & Boston; Western Maryland; 
Delaware & Hudson; Illinois Central; Yazoo & 
Mississippi Valley; Central of Georgia, forty- 
three in all. 

Mr. F. A. Vanderlip, until recently president 
of the National City Bank, is on the board of 
the International Mercantile Marine, and Mr. 
Franklin, the president of the International 
Mercantile Marine, is on the board of the 
National City Bank. Directors of the National 
City Bank are to be found on the boards of 
the following roads: 

El Paso & Southwestern; Southern; Chicago, 
Indiana & St. Louis; Mobile & Ohio; Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul; Orego-. Short Line; 
Oregon-Washington Railroad & Navigation 
Co.; Rutland; New York Central; Union Pacific; 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; Michigan 
Central; Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. 
Louis; Pittsburgh & Lake Erie; Lake Erie '& 
Western; St. Joseph & Grand Island; Chicago 
& Alton; Yazoo & Mississippi Valley; Illinois 
Central; Central of Georgia; Los Angeles & 
Salt Lake; Galveston, llarrisburg & San An- 
tonio; Houston & Texas Central; Morgan's 
Louisiana & Texas R. R.; Texas & New Or- 
leans; Arizona Eastern; Southern Pacific; Loui- 
siana Western; Houston East & West Te I 
Co.; Chicago & North Western; Cincinnati, New 
Orleans & Texas Pacific, thirty-one in all. 

The roads that bring the products of the 
country to the coast for shipment, of course, 
largely control those shipments overseas. Here 
you see how skillfully the masters of trans- 
portation by land and water of Great Britain 
and the United States are combined in interest 
and associated together to control our maritime 
commerce in the interest of British shipping 
corporations and the British Government, so 
that a few financiers may be enabled to 
the profits of the business. And the profits 
of the business, mind you, arise from trans- 
porting our goods abroad, and arise almost 
solely from transporting our goods abroad. 

When the project of selling the stock of 
these British companies to Americans was 
broached by the elder Morgan to Lord Eller- 
man some years ago, the latter, who was the 
president of the Lcyland Co., addressed his 
stockholders and advised them to make the 
sale. He said: 

"lint we must look at this matter all around, 



and 1 am bound to tell you that there arc two 
factors in regard to the shipping trade which, 
while on the one hand it would be quite pos- 
sible to exaggerate their importance and take 
too serious a view of their importance, it would, 
on the other band, be exceedingly foolish to 
ignore and not give due consideration to. You 
may accept that offer or you may decline it, as 
seems best to you in your wisdom, but of one 
thing be sure, American capital is coming into 
the Atlantic trade, and is coming into the At- 
lantic trade to stay. The Atlantic trade is a 
peculiar trade in this respect, that it is almost 
entirely an eastbound trade. Your vessels going 
out to the United States take practically noth- 
ing. They do not pay their way, or anything 
like it. The profit is wholly made upon the 
return cargo. 

"Now, an eastbound trade means the carriage 
of produce from the United States to Great 
Britain and the Continent. Well, the relations 
of Messrs. Morgan to the great railway systems 
of the United States are known to everybody, 
and you can judge for yourselves, without any 
enlarging upon the matter, whether Messrs. 
Morgan and their friends coming into the At- 
lantic trade would or would not come into 
thai trade under very favorable conditions so 
far as they were concerned and very unfavorable 
conditions as far as many of their competitors 
were concerned." (See Congressional Record, 
March 15, 1902, p. 2847.) 

Why, how simple it all was. If you would 
study the great lines of railroad that traverse 
your country, and see how they center in New 
York, and then study the directorates of those 
railroads and the directorates of the great 
financial institutions of New York, you would 
see how completely it is possible for the masters 
of those transportation systems to deliver the 
products of this country to any shipping con- 
cerns in which they are interested, so far as 
overseas trade is concerned. Lord Pirrie saw- 
that. His long experience in the transportation 
service, his mastery of the large portion of it 
which Great Britain dominates made him at 
once open-minded to this proposition of an 
alliance with these American financiers who 
control the railroads of this country, whose 
affiliations with British shipping interests would 
be of tremendous mutual benefit and profit if 
any proper arrangement could be effected. So 
this arrangement was effected and these con- 
tracts were entered into. 

But the British Government, ever with an eye 
single to British interests, saw to it that those 
affiliations were dominated by contract pro- 
visions that would protect British interests 
ever. Ever in the forefront of British inter- 
national relations sits the great purpose of pro- 
tecting British interests and British commerce, 
which is the basis of British wealth. So these 
contracts were made. 

Mr. Ellerman saw- that American capital com- 
ing into this business, owning or controlling 
the terminal facilities here and the railroads 
which carry the products to the ships, could 
build and qperate their own ships to the ex- 
clusion of British competitors. Then, apparent- 
ly, was devised the scheme I have but im- 
perfectly outlined to you, whereby a few rulers 
of railroads and financial magnates combined 
to ship our goods in British ships under the 
British flag for the upbuilding of the British 
merchant marine and the destruction of our 
own for the dollars they could get out of it. 

I have said a number of times that I would 
bring to the attention of Senators the recent 
appointments made by the present Shipping- 
Board, which I think, Mr. President, call for 
some comment, and I believe that here is 
perhaps the best place to introduce that infor- 
mation. 

Of course, I take it that Senators know 
that when the Shipping Control Committee was 
established in 1918, English domination was 
very pronounced. Indeed all of the earlier 
operations were largely under British control. 
\\ lien the Shipping Control Committtec was 
established in 1918 Sir Guthrie was made a 
member of it, representing British interests. 
The other two members were P. A. S. franklin, 
jident of the International Mercantile Ma- 
rine, the associations and business connections 
of which 1 have spent much time upon, and 
II. II. Raymond, president of the Clyde Line 
and now president of the American Steamship 
Owners' Association, an intimate ol Franklin. 

W. J. Love, American manager for Francis 
Withy & Co., shown in the upper left-band 
Corner of the charl which hangs upon the wall 
With its British connections, served as a director 
at that time of trades and allocations. I ask 
irs t^i I i ep that name in mind. 
The chartering committee of the Shipping 
Board at th time consisted of three 

members, the first of whom was J. Bai 
Smull. Me is now at the head of the division 
of operations. I f • - was in an important position 
under the old Shipping Board. lie is in a 
very important position under the present 
Slopping Board as the director of the division 
of operatic 

The other members were A. J. fetterlock, 
vice president of the International Mercantile 
Marine, and Welding King, of the United 
States and Australian Steamsjwp Co., which T 
believe only British lines, alth 

! am not absolutely certain that there ma\ 
(Continued on page 11) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia— 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adeliade, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions. Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 14-16 Central Building, 41 
North John Street, Liverpool. 
BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 
Transportarbeiter Verband, Reichsabteilung 
Seeleute. Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, 
Germany. 

FRANCE 
General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan 7, 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 
Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Langgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbogade, 15 Copen- 
hagen. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Copenhagen. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, L. Strand- 
strade 20, Copenhagen. 

HOLLAND 
Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

ITALY 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Corso Principe Odone 2, Genoa, Italy. 
SPAIN 
Socicdad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Qalle 
Inglaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Socicdade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedistinos 18, Rio de Janeiro 
SOUTH AFRICA 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



iillllllllllllllllllill 



:iiiii: minimum !*:;iui!ii-imi;uii in; uii'in m : 






Itnniiniliinm 



The United States Engineers' Office 
at Eureka intimates that work in 
progress on the jetties at that port 
will 1 e halted fur lack of funds 
within a week. No matter what 
steps may ho taken by Congn 
period of inactivity on the jetties 
will result. 

The Bureau of Lighthouses 
nounced that the Point Robert Light 
on Washington Sound, repi 
tinguished on September 17, will be 
hted as soon as practicable. The 
< Kford reel' gas whistling and suh- 
marine hall buoy 20R, reported ex- 
tinguished several has been 
relighted and placed in it> proper 
position. 

In spite of the setback it received 
on account of the war, the German 
mercantile marine will he one of 
the sharpest competitors to be en- 
countered by the American mer- 
chant marine. indiscriminate 
rate cutting, chartering vessels of 
other nationalities and building new j 
ships at top speed, the Germans are 
assembling a fleet which is already 
formidable enough to make itself 
felt. 

All of all ports of the 

world for the importation of lumber 
were broken by the Port of San 
Pedro the month ending September 
5. Traffic manager Pederson of the , 
harbor department announced that 
135,000,000 feet of lumber had been 
received and discharged there in 
that time. The local record for ar- 
rivals and departure of steamers also 
was broken. There were 135 steam- 
ship owners arriving and sixty-nine 
off-shore vessels. 

Xew coastwise sea regulations 
state that every steamer or barge 
carrying passenger's shall be pro- 
vided with suitable ladders to enable 
ngers to descend conveniently 
to the lifeboats and liferafts. One 
■ if such ladders shall be provided for 
each set of boat davits and kept 
ready and convenient for use on the 
boat deck, and shall be long enough 
to reach from such deck to the ves- 
sel's seagoing light-water line. All 
such ladders shall be reversible and i 
free from projections, the ruling 
states. 

Tlie decision of the Marine Court 
of Enquiry, which investigated the 
stranding of the Canadian Govern- 
ment steamer "Canadia Exporter" 
on Willapa bar on July 31, and 
which suspended the master, Captain 
Bradley, for six months, is to 
challenged by the latter. Papers have 
been filed to bring the matter before 
the Supreme Court on September 26. 
The basis of the appeal is that no 
charges were preferred against Cap- 
tain Bradley, and that he was given 
no opportunit j of pre >i i de- i 

The Pacific Steamship Company 
received word from Yokohama that 
the sailing of the steamer "llawkeye 
has been delayed from that 
port on account of a mishap to its 
machinery. The vessel will leave 
Yokohama for San o on Oc- 

tober 11 via Honolulu. The "Hawk- 
eye State" is under charter to 
Matson Navigation Company, but 
was loaned to the Paci 5l amship 
Company for one Oriental trip. Since 
the steamber has been in servh 
the Pacific Coast it lias had four 
mishaps, one at Salina Cruz, one at 
San Pedro, one when it collided with 
the steamer "Wanatchee" on Puget 
id, and the recent mishap in the 
< irient. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 

SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 

Prices 

Represented by 



All work done in 

our own sanitary 

workshop 

E. PEGUILLAN 



Established 
for 20 years 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 




MARINE ENGINEERING — NAVIGATION 

We prepare you for examination in four to six weeks — either course. 
Eighty dollars pays for individual instruction until you get your license. 

THE TECHNICAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

W. P. Pierson, Principal 
Phone Fillmore 9 7 0—2707 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Alilstrom, Ellis 
Ahlstrom, Kllian F. 
Apinaitis. Antony 
Anderson, J. A. 
Amundsen, Ben 
Allen, I. J. 
Allen, William 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Bill 
Anderson, A. B. 
Allen, E. 
Bassin, George 
Back. Christ 
Haeliman, Peter 

W. 
Raker, Eddie 
Beals, Chas. M. 
th, K. M. 
Hennett, Chas. C. 
Boria, Mike 
Breen, Thomas 
Bach, S. C. 
Hakke. Eilif J. 
Corrigan, Reul B. 
Cooper, Oswald 
Durett, Joseph E. 
Doehring, Otto M. 
l (.- Mon, Earl 
Danielson, Alben 
l Hetz, A. 

Erlckson, Emanuel 
Erickson, Hans E. 
Bills, I- W. S. 
Kmmerz, Josef 
Bngler, Samuel 
Klze, Carl 
Fielding, P. 
Forsberg, Swen L. 
Framnes, A. 
Fugman, Arthur 
Foster, Clarence 
Francis, William S. 
Golden, Roy L. 
clilkison. A. F. 
«',riv. John 
Gluck, Karl 
Gorman, Peter A. 
Gallery, Russell B. 
i (laser, Jean 
Green, Joe 
Harris. Thomas 
Hall, Robert E. 
Ilalvorsen, Hans 
Hopperman, ll. 
Holman, Martin 
Hanson, William 
Harris, John T. 
Huber, Charles L. 
Hanson, O. 
Howell, E. W. 
Hanson, Carl 
Holman, Martin 
Hofstad, Lester 
ilenriksen. George 
Hines, Leo 
Hill. Charles 
Holmes, M. 
Heino, Gust. 



Inguealsen, Arthur 
Jensen, Emanuel 
Johansen. Stefan 
Jensen, Chris 

-2278 
Johnson, E. 
Johnsen, Ben 
Jensen, E. Churs 
Joyce. Dan 
Koster, Walter 
Klaver, R. 
Karlsson, August 
Kopperrnan. H. 
Kluck, Karl 
Kaaveland. Thos. 
Kennedy, Bart 
Kelly, D. J. 
Kiepper, T. 
Korliz, Jack 
Kraus. Jaek 
Larson, Chris 
Lundgren, Gust 
Law, H. C. 
Lackey, Chas. H. 

M. 
Lambers, G. B. 
Lesklnen, John 
Lewis, H. S. 
Lent, Frank 
Langerud, Henry 
Milionald, James 
Miller, Wlnford 
Mack, George W. 
Martin, Charles 
MallkofT, Peter 
Meyer, Robert 
Morey, Art J. 
Mikkelsen, Harry 
Muldrose. W. L. 
Markim, Bernard 
Mackway, George 
McGregor 
Neuman, Alex 
Neuman, John C. 
Norberg, John E. 
Norgaard, Henry 
Norman, A. 
Nelson, Peter 
Nilsen, Christ 
Olson, John 
Olsen, Michael 
Olson. Tom 
Osterlund. A. J. 
Peppert, Fred C. 
Peterson, Carl A. 
Petersen, William 
Pettersen, John 
Paterson, George 
Petersen, Knut 
Tursi. Ernest 
Paystl, Anskelm 
Preston, E. 
Pope. Bert 
Pehle, Frank L. 
Rhodes, Russel C. 
Redondo, Manuel 
Rover, John T. 

ii. J. 
Robertson, E. J. 



Rengsdorf, W. 
Sibley, Milton 
Madling, Axell 

.. Harvey S. 
Sauer, O. K. 
Samuelsen, Sigvart 
Sanderson 
Skaar, Jakol 
Skubber, Hans 
Skaar, O. W. 
Bwansson, N. O. 
Smith, Carl J. 
Sitts, Bud 
Sinclair, P. 
Sterner, Charles 
Slade, I. S. 
Sanders, George 
Svansson, Ernest 
Toomey, Paul 
Thompson, Guy 
Thornquist, Adolf 
Tuhkanen, John J. 
Tolman, W. E. 
Torwlcte, H. 
Taylor, Bert 
Tingstrom, A. R. 
Taylor, J. G. 
Velte, Clayton L. 



Weber. Fred C. 
Westley, W. E. 
Walter, B. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Witravamen, Geo. 
Warniek, A. D. 
Walters, Fred L. 
Wohn, Otje 
Wolff, Herbert 
Wood, E. E. 
White, William 
Wurtanen, Frans 
Willey, Edward 
York, Chas. E. 
REGISTERED 
LETTERS 
Peterson, Carl 
Behmar, Joe 
Oelgado, Nazarlo 
Worgaard, H. 
PACKAGES 
Adams, H. C. 
Heaps, James 
La Born, Rov 
Okasskl, Welling- 
ton 
Scarthland, Gunnar 
Williams. Edward 



OLD KENTUCKY TOBACCO 

Rich, Nature 
"The Kind That Made Ken- 
tucky Famous." Chewing or smok- 
ing. ". lbs. 11.00 postpaid, 

KENTUCKY TOBACCO ASSN. 
W 452, Hawesvllle, Ky. 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE— S. G. Swanson is not connected 
Willi any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cat. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Fred Klein, who left New Orleans 
on the S. S. "Lake Ferona" in 
March, 1920, is inquired for by his 
father, L. Klein. Address, care the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion, 543 Bienville Street, New 
Orleans, La. Charles Thoresen, 
Agent. 



Anyone knowing how Eugene Mc- 
Nulty, coalpasser, met his death re- 
cently at Boat Harbor, Newport 
News, Va., while employed on S. S. 
'"Co'quit," will confer a favor on his 
mother, Mrs. Frances McNulty, 511 
Hemlock street, Scranton, Pa., or 
Silas B. Axtell, 9 State street, New 
York City, by communicating with 
either one. 



ALBERT MICHELSON, Attor- 
ney-at-law; attorney for Marine 
Firemen & Watertenders' Union; 
Admiralty law a specialty. 676 Mills 
Bldg., Telephone Douglas 1058. Resi- 
dence Phone Prospect 2908. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of William Peterson, born in Nor- 
way, last heard of in Bayonne, N. J., 
when he quit the S. S. "Gulfland" on 
November 11, 1918; is requested to 
communicate with Joseph A. Moran, 
43 Ship street, or John Ward, 489 
F.ddy street, Providence, R. I. 

4-27-21 



Mrs. John M. Eshleman, 601 Un- 
derwood Building, San Francisco, is 
anxious to ascertain the whereabouts 
of Louis B artels, a native of Fin- 
laud, age 45 years, hair and com- 
plexion light, medium built. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts will 
please communicate. 9-14-21 



Louis Seipel 1'. O. Box 67, San 
, I'edro, Calif., is anxious to ascertain 
the whereabouts of Fritz Griesan, of 
Brandenburg, Germany. Any infor- 
mation apprecia 9-21-21 

You Want the Truth 

This year there will be Btirring times 
in the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
iiiK t. m and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette Is making a 
real fight to lilt some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them where they belong — on exeess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ins; attaeked more bitterly than any 
oilier man in public life. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year — Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine. Madison. Wis. 



SINGLE ROOMS 
$1.50. $1.71 $2.M a Week 

BROOKLYN HOTEL 

369 First Street Phone Douglas 604 

SINGLE HOUSEKEEPING KOOMS 

Per Week 
DOUBLE HOUSEKEEPING UOOMS 
$5.50 Per Week 



THE 

JAMES H. BARRY CO. 

"Uhe Star Tress 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

We print "The Seamen's Journal" 



To Scandinavian Sailors: 

Inheritances collected. Money 
forwarded to all places in Sweden, 
Norway, and Denmark to banks 
or private persons at lowest rates. 
Full guarantee. 

LEONARD GEORGES, 
General Passenger Agent Swedish- 
American Line, 268 Market St. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




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Standard Oil Crowd Finances Mexico's 
Latest "Revolution" 

The recent Tampico "revolution" was in- 
stigated by the Standard oil group, which 
made such a noise about danger to property 
that the United States Government ordered 
two warships to Tampico. The "hat was 
passed" in Houston, Texas, to finance the 
uprising against the Mexican Government. 

The above charge is made by W. H. 
Gray, President of the National Association 
of Independent Oil Producers, in a letter 
to W. II. Sproul, President of the Kansas 
Oil and Gas Men's Association, at Sedan, 
Kansas. 

It is stated that immediately after Mexico 
taxed oil imported from that country the 
Standard ( )il group started a movement to 
boycott Mexico and in addition "pull off a 
small revolution to throw the fear of God 
into the Mexican Government." 

"The 'hat was passed' by Houston oil 
companies to finance the plan. 

"A loud noise was made at Washington. 
The announcement was made that all tools 
be shut down in the Mexican district, and 
word went out that conditions were dan- 
gerous there. A pseudo-revolution was 
publicly proclaimed with a general in the 
field in command. The necessity for war- 
ships was pointed out to the State Depart- 
ment at Washington. Presto ! The Navy 
ordered two warship to Tampico. 

"Meanwhile the revolution (there was 
one general and 50 men) was in full swing 
in the Panico River district. The Mexican 
Government promptly sent a detachment of 
soldiers in pursuit of the band of revolu- 
tionists who surrendered upon proper guar- 
antee of safety and made confession that 
they were merely camouflaging for certain 
oil interests in the United States. 

"The State Department, which had been 
led into an apparent warlike demonstration 
against Mexico by sending warships 
into a friendly harbor, was immediately 
swamped with telegrams from all parts of 
the United States protesting against any 
such demonstration. Of course, the prompt- 
ness with which the Mexican Government 
put down the 'petroleum rebellion' in the 
Panico district made it unnecessary for the 
warships to remain for a longer period 
than twenty-four to thirty-six hours, and 
the order was given to get out and get out 
quick which left the actors in this opera 
bouft'e in very bad grace with the State 
Department at Washington and the State 
Department at Mexico, and there was 
nothing to do but lean heavily upon the 
boycott. 

"The first skirmish resulted in a victory 
for the Mexican Government and a defeat 
for the 'oilers.' However, it was announced 
the boycott would be continued notwith- 
standing the Washington Government had 
quietly decamped from the held of action. 

"By the middle of August it became very 
apparent that the Mexican Government 
was going to be able to hold out for a much 
longer period without the tax than the boy- 
cotters were without the oil. 

"The Standard crowd then determined to 
send the heads of the leading companies 
which had entered into the boycott down 
to Mexico City, and they succeeded in per- 



suading the Mexican Government to allow 
them to pay this tax quarterly instead of 
monthly." 

Workers Oppose Jingoism 

Wage earners should keep in mind the 
announced purpose of the limitation-of- 
armament conference on November 11 and 
refuse to be sidetracked by manufactured 
issues. 

Some of the world's most cunning minds 
and sharpest publicity agents will be 
in Washington at that time to mold public 
opinion for imperialists, militarists and 
commercial expansionists. 

These forces — skillful, resourceful and 
uncrupulous — would barter a world's ideal 
for their selfish purpose. 

Wage earners must be alert to the 
methods of this sinister group, whose 
leading cards are national and racial 
prejudices, foreign concessions, high so- 
ciety and political influence. 

For the year ending June 30, last year, 
Congress appropriated $5,686,005,606. Of 
this amount 92.8 per cent was voted for 
recent and previous wars and for the War 
and Navy Departments. 

One per cent of the $5,686,005,606 was 
voted for research, educational and de- 
velopmental, including the Public Health, 
Labor, Agricultural, Federal Education, 
Bureau of Mines, Women's and Children's 
Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau 
of Standards, Library of Congress, etc. 

In other words, Congress voted more 
than five and one-half billion dollars for 
Governmental purposes last year, and 
out of every dollar of this vast sum 92 
8-10 cents were for war purposes while 
1 cent was devoted to the arts and 
processes of peace. 

Militarists will pile their back-breaking- 
debt on labor as long as labor permits. 

Labor has made repeated protests, but 
let every man, woman and child join in 
such a thunderous protest" on Armistice 
Day against war expenditures that even 
the most hardened militarist will be af- 
fected. 

Ninety-three cents for war and 1 cent 
for peace is not a healthy condition. It 
is a menace to democratic life. 

loin with the American Federation of 
Labor in its program of mass meetings 
and parades on Armistice Day against 93 
cents for war and 1 cent for peace. 

Interest every other America-loving 
citizen in this anti-militarist, anti-jingo 
movement that is eating up the people's 
sustenance, and retarding the development 
of a fuller life. 

"The time has come to disarm." 



Greedy Shipowners 

Shipowners are bringing immigrants to 
America in defiance of the new immigration 
law, which limits the number of arrivals 
From each country to 3 per cent of the 
nationals who were in this country in 1910. 
The shipowners' greed and their disregard 
for law has congested New York. The 
(Continued on Page 11.) 

S T Hogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer, Seamen's 
pecialty. Sixth floor Pacific Bldi 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 

■iv 1880. — Adv. 



PIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIB 

| International Seamen's Union | 
| of America 

Biii:!:i:i'i;i;ii;i:]i|i[ii][iiiiii[]i!'!:;:: : : ;:: : .: ■: , !;: , ::i 1 ::.':!:!;; :: :.:,!:;, i :;;i::;::r:'::i:::!.::!,::;ii:;iiB 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street. Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR. Secretary 

1% Lewis Street 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 67-69 Front Street 

BALTIMORE, Mrl c. RASMUSSEN. Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

13 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON. Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60y 2 Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La CHARLES THORSEN. Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex SAM HALL, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex L. LARSEN. Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHARLES MARTELL. Agent 

369 South Main Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. j. LEWIS, Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEON W. MENDEL, Agent 

707 Palafox Street 

TAMPA, Fla c. F. BIGELOW, Agent 

205 Polk Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C ERNEST H. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN. President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowline- Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, NY. D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A . MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf s 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T . KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS Agent 

411 Union Street 

BALTIMORE, Md H . MEYERS, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK NOLAN Agent 

140 South Third Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK Agent 

413y 2 Twenty-first Street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S. OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON. Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y TAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa.... FRANK LIBBY Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

812 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

2212 West Avenue 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex H. LONDEMA, Agent 

332% Proctor Street 

GALVESTON. Tex J. KOMISKIE, Agent 

2306 Post Office Street. Ave. E. 

BOSTON, Mass. JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP. Agent 

r,13 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS. La DAN LYONS, Agent 

600 Chartres Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. McCABE, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I HARRY RIDLEY, Agent 

296 Eddy Street 

PORTLAND, Me MCDONALD, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga H. COOK, Agent 

27 I louston Street 
CHARLESTON, S. C ...R. MCLAUGHLIN. Agent 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

WM. IT. BROWN, Secretary 
Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK N Y TAMES J. FAGAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 
H. ESKIN, Secretary 

I" .I'.OKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
NEW HAVEN, Conn 13% Collls Street 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 






"!;■ I.' 1 "!-' ' 



Published Weekly at San Francisco 
by THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 18B7 
j 

J. VANCE THOMPSON Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $3.00 | Six months - - - $160 
Advertising Rates on Application. 
Business and Editorial Office. Martime Hall Bldg., 
E» Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address ail communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Franrrsco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
Of po! Ided for in Section 1103, Act of 

r 3. lfllT. authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
general interest, hrief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1921. 



REAL MEN NEEDED 



Taking timely advantage of world con- 
ditions, conscienceless employers every- 
where are exploiting, gouging and degrad- 
ing their employes to the limit. Perhaps 
none are more a ive in these efforts 

to subjugate the workers than the ship- 
ping interests. 

Powerful, perfectly organized and un- 
scrupulous, they seem determined to de- 
grade the seamen's calling to such extent 
that no self-respecting individual will be 
able to seek a seagoing career. With their 
great wealth and control of international 
commerce, the operators arc enabled to 
bring tremendous influence upon Govern- 
ments for fulfilment of their purposes; 
they can disregard laws with impunity 
and are even capable of chastising or using 
disciplinary measures upon such law- 
makers as may court or warrant their 
displeasure. But, there is one element 
which all their great wealth and power can 
never control and that is the human ele- 
ment, the qualities and character of man. 

It lies within ourselves whether we be 
freemen, only we are capal 
molding our own destiny. If we lack the 
spirit t<> rebel against injustice, or fear to 
id our liberties, there can he only one 
final ending to our dreams —we shall re- 
main slaves. 

Those who would make the calling of 
seamen what it ought to he must he up 
and doing; we cannot tamely submit to the 
lash of the slave-driver, we cannot cringe 
or fawn or evade the issue. Wc must con- 
front the situation as men, not as weak- 
lings. 

As seamen at different times, we have 
suffered hunger, scurvy and degradation 
of the deep-water lime-juicer. We have 
experienced the hardships and indignities 
of "Yankee lull ships." We have wrestled 
with hell and cheated Davy Jones' locker 
in unseaworthy tramps of all nations, and 
yet we have brought the ends of the world 

tOgel I 

What has 1- he thoughts of men as 

they run before the brimming trades. 
\\ hat visions have been seen in the quiet 



moonlight watches of the tropics when 
they have stood alone in a vessel's top or 
on her decks, filling their lungs to the 
limit with God's pure air. with only the 
sky above and the deep blue, unfathomable 
■ '-van below? You can stretch your arms 
out to the Infinite as the noble Redman to 
the Great Spirit rind feel yourself a man. 

There is. then, no room for small' 
thoughts or cowardly fears; only hope, 
ambition, aspirations and ideals. Or, 
when running down your easting, fighting 
the elements in their ugliest mood with 
grim determination to conquer. It is such 
things that tend to mold the character of 
seamen and men. 

Bui ashore, as now. confronted with un- 
employment, distress and all the ramifica- 
tions of an imperfect society, should we 
find cause to fear, or should we face the 
future unafraid? There are seamen who 
by dint of hard and earnest effort have 
climbed from the lower stratas, hut even 
they have seen their pitiful savings dwindle 
piecemeal. They confront an uncertain 
future with shadows of poverty and priva- 
tion stalking in the back-round. They 
may witness a child's need or see the lines 
of care and worry intrude upon the fea- 
tures of loved ones, perhaps a wife, mother 
or sister. There are dreams no longer 
merely cold, material facts and a situation 
which will put manhood to the severest 
list. AN'ill such men. who have been sub- 
ject to hardship and degradation, fail now? 
Will they quail when further indignities 
are heaped upon them? Seamen should 
these thoughts with them, nurse them 
in the dog-watch. Keep them with you in 
the lonely night watches; let them sink 
into your soul until you understand what 
calibre of man is required in order that 
he he free, and the very waves will seem 
to echo a cry for justice. 



A THRIVING INDUSTRY 



Much is being said and written nowa- 
days about the unemployment situation, 
of industries, production, etc. Factories 
have been closed down, transportation is 
operating at a minimum, and general de- 
ms to he the order of the 
day. However, if we would keep in touch 
with current events, it will be noted that 
an occasional boom takes place in some 

nerally overlooked quarters. These 
booms may not he apparent to all, but a 
close inspection shows that in these times 
of strikes and lockouts there is one set of 
gentry who endeavor to take advantage of 
conditions, and that is the private de- 
tecl ives. 

\ny individual, without character or 
scruples, revealing the least symptoms of 
a prospective Sherlock Holmes, does not 
find it difficult to "get In ." 

During the recent lockout hundreds of 
these specimens were swarming the water- 
front on docks and ships, and it was, 
doubtless, with keen regret that they 
viewed the termination of the struggle: 
they do not take kindly to loss of such 
easy graft. 

Again, these birds have scented a prom- 
ise of a new boom, and such willing tools 
of predatory wealth have cast their eyes 
towards the California oil fields. Observa- 
tion will show that there is no lack of re- 
cruiting agencies in the City of San Fran- 
cisco, even institutions bearing the mark | 



of respectability and declared to be char- 
acter builders have lent their efforts to- 
ward- obtaining would-be sleuths and 
strikebreakers. The parties doing the hir- 
ing state that it is easy work, no experi- 
ence required. Each aspiring gunman is 
furnished with an identification card in 
order that in the event of being picked up 
by the police he may be set free immedi- 
ately. What sort of character builder is 
an institution that would lend its support 
to the recruiting of such social jackals? 



THEY'RE NOT CONCERNED 



With billions of dollars tied up in tax 

exempt securities and the pleasant busi- 

of coupon clipping undisturbed, the 

money-hog can well afford to sit tight and 
let the industrial situation evolve as best 
it may. 

So long as millions in interest can be 
transferred to whatever pleasant part of 
the world its recipient may he. what do 
they care for the welfare of those from 
whom the lucre has been wrung. 

( )ne of the surest methods of speeding 
up production again would he heavier in- 
stead of lighter taxes upon excessive 
profits and incomes. 



Yea, Bo! Bullet-heads and sandpaper 

necks have no monopoly on the rough stuff 
when it comes to linguistic defamation. 
In comparison with some we have heard, 
the average Johnny Yegg is a Chester- 
field. You should listen to certain of our 
ted shipowners in action when the 
occasion seems to be ripe. In polite so- 
ciety they resemble a hull in a china shop. 
It is not to be expected that waterfront 
characters, even cmployVrs, would US 
all times Shakespearean language; hut, Oh, 
Boy! 



A COWARD'S PART 



That pale word "neutral" sits becomingly 
i >n lips of weaklings. 
Hut tin' men whose brain- 
Kind fuel in their blood, the men whose 

minds 
Mold sympathetic converse with their 

hearts. 
Such men are never neutral. The word 

stands 
Unsexed and impotent in realms of speech. 
When mighty problems face a startled 

world 
Xo virile man is neutral. Right or wrong. 
His thoughts go forth, assertive, unafraid 
To stand by his convictions, and to do 
His part in shaping issues to an end. 
Silence may guard the door of useless 

words 
At dictate of Discretion; but to stand 
Without opinions in a world which needs 
Constructive thinking is a coward's part! 
— Ella Wheeler Wilcox. 



The I. oval Legion of Loggers and Lum- 
bermen, the company "union" of Xorth- 
west lumber barons, sings a new song. 
The Legion aided the barons in hammering 
wages to the suhsistence point in localities 
where the bona fide Timber Workers' 
Union is weak or does not exist. The de- 
pression continues, however, and now the 
Legion says high wages of building crafts- 
men is the cause of idleness. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



A SHAMEFUL EVENT 



The following from a recent issue of 
the San Francisco Examiner is worthy of 
more than passing - notice : 

"The narratives of the horrible suffering 
in Russia make the heart of any good man 
sick. The agonies of children and babes, 
the despair of men and women — the dread- 
ful, dreadful agonies that torture and kill 
these helpless, wretched human beings — 
are beyond the power of words to tell. 

"The pitiful and shameful thing is that 
this awful suffering was deliberately cre- 
ated by the heads of the so-calied Chris- 
tian and civilized governments; that Brit- 
ish and French and American money was 
spent by the hundreds of millions to re- 
cruit and finance the invading hordes 
which made it necessary to use and wear 
out the transportation systems in military 
service, while the blockade of every en- 
trance into Russia made it impossible to 
procure either new equipment for trans- 
portation use or food for the cities, or even 
medicines and disinfectants to ward off the 
awful ravages of the plagues. 

"The men who committed this terrible 
crime against humanity still wear fine 
raiment and dine sumptuously and are 
extolled as statesmen and excused by any 
convenient lie that can be invented. But 
they will go to the judgment bar of 
Almighty God some day red with the 
blood and damned by the accusing cries 
of a great host of human beings whom 
they ruthlessly and wickedly condemned 
to die the terrible death of the starved. 
And before the dreadful and just Judge 
no subterfuge and no lie will avail them." 

If we could feel certain that retributive 
justice would surely overcome all who are 
responsible for the pitiful misery of our 
fellows in Russia, we might experience a 
certain uneasiness for ourselves for our 
apathy, and for permitting consummation 
of the crime of the ages. 



MINIMUM WAGE LAWS 



The frightful mortality in industry is 
indicated by a statement issued by the 
State Workmen's Compensation Board. 
From January 1, 1916, to September 1, 
1921, there were 1,089,353 accidents, of 
which 15,517 were fatal cases. This terri- 
ble slaughter in peace times does not in- 
clude every accident in Pennsylvania in- 
dustry during the five-year period as the 
board only includes those cases that are 
reported to it. 



The Canadian Government has loaned 
her returned soldiers more than $80,000,- 
000 to pay for stock and equipment for 
farms which they have either bought or 
homesteaded. 



KANSAS BANS LABOR FILM 



The State Board of Censors for Moving- 
Pictures has refused permission to exhibit 
in Kansas a film production in which 
union coal miners are represented as hav- 
ing won a strike. The permit was not 
issued because the board felt that the 
exhibition would inspire class antago- 
nisms that would be "damaging to the 
public interest." A facetious comment 
upon the board's action proposes that the 
strike in the moving picture be submitted 
to the Industrial Relations Court to find 
out whether or not it is according to the 
"can't-strike" law. 



The fixing of wage rates by act of law 
is a practice that is quite general in a num- 
ber of countries where men as well as 
women come within the scope of the laws. 
In the United States, minimum wage laws 
are found in twelve States,- the District of 
Columbia and Porto Rico, but they are 
applicable only to women and miners. 
The U. S. Department of Labor, through 
its Bureau of Labor Statistics, has just 
issued as Bulletin No. 285 an account of 
the minimum wage legislation of the 
United States, including its legal construc- 
tion and its operation in the different juris- 
dictions. 

Rates are usually fixed by a board or 
commission, though in Arizona and Utah 
the law itself names the rate. The indus- 
tries covered may be few or many, accord- 
ing to the terms of the law. Wisconsin 
covers all employments with a single order, 
while California has nine and Massachu- 
setts fifteen orders applicable to as many 
industries or classifications. 

The entire history of this legislation has 
been marked by attacks on its constitu- 
tionality, but the Supreme Courts of five 
States have upheld their laws as valid, 
with no adverse decision by such a Court. 
There still is evident a disposition to re- 
gard the laws as interfering with the 
"freedom of contract," which, of course, 
they do, as does practically every "labor 
law," notably those fixing the hours of 
labor, compensation of workmen for in- 
juries, etc., which have been fully vindi- 
cated in the Courts. Moreover, the survey 
by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the 
reports of administrative commissions indi- 
cate a very general acceptance of the law 
by employers, many of them giving it a 
hearty approval, as to both principles and 
results. 

The economic effect of these laws is 
said to be a general wage increase in 
favor of the persons affected by them, 
though without any apparent tendency for 
the minimum fixed by legal process to 
become the maximum or even the standard 
wage, although the laws have largely done 
away with wide variations in wages paid 
for identical services. The employment of 
younger children is said to have been re- 
stricted in some cases — a result that is 
regarded as beneficial, in view of the 
desirability of deferring employment in 
favor of school attendance. 

The first law of this type enacted in the 
United States was in Massachusetts in 
1912, eight other States following in 1913. 
Questions of constitutionality caused a 
check in legislation, from which the move- 
ment has hardly recovered, though three 
laws were enacted in 1919. The fact of 
the current reorganization of industry is 
an argument both for and against action, 
employers feeling that there is need of 
free and rapid adjustment to meet chang- 
ing conditions, while the proponents of this 
form of regulation regard it as necessary 
in an unusual degree in order to steady 
conditions that are in danger of working 
undue injury to the group of workers for 
whose benefit such laws are enacted. 



IC1AL 



IIIIIIIIII! 
SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cat, Sept. 26, 1921 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 
7 p. m., J. Vance Thompson, presiding. Secre- 
tary reported shipping poor; plenty of idle 
members ashore. Following were declared 
elected delegates to the Twenty-Second Annual 
Convention of California State Federation of 
Labor, to convene on the 3rd day of October, 
1921 at San Jose, Calif.: B. Bentsen, Andrew 
Furuseth, George Larsen. 

R INGWARDSEN, 
Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 19, 1921. 
Shipping and prospects dull. 
1C , „ , R- TOWNSEND. Agent. 

153 Cordova St. W. P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 19, 1921. 
Shipping fair. 

„_ x A. KLEMMSEN, Agent. 

2016 N. 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 19, 1921. 
Shipping dull. 

„„ „ p - B - GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 19, 1921. 
Shipping in steam schooners fair. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 28. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 19, 1921. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

ao , „*. J ACK ROSEN, Agent. 

88^ Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 19, 1921. 
Shipping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67 
Phone 137-R. 



Those, willing to learn by experience can 
turn defeat into victory. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 12, 1921. 
Shipping picking up. 

WILLIAM HARDY, Agent 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 
E^— — mb— » m. m Hur.fm ■ iM i 

DIED 

Walter Douglas, No. 134, a native of Illinois, 
age 49. Died at Portland, Ore., Sept. 21, 1921. 

Aage Wm. Emanuel Petersen, No. 1391, a 
native of Denmark, age 33. Died at San Pedro, 
Cal., Sept. 17, 1921. 

Olaf Peterson, No. 1379, a native of Sweden, 
age 41. Died at San Francisco, Cal., Sept 
23, 1921. 

The attention of seamen and fishermen 
is respectfully directed to our advertisers. 
It has always paid to advertise in the 
Journal, and in spite of the fact that the 
purchasing power of seamen was recently 
somewhat restricted we are at all times in 
a position to patronize those who seek our 
trade and good will. AVhile looking for 
the union label, remember our advertisers. 

According to statistics issued by the Suez 
Canal Company, 4009 vessels, with an ag- 
gregate net tonnage of 17,574,657 tons, 
passed through the canal in the year 1920, 
as compared with 3986 vessels and 16,013,- 
802 tons in 1919 and 5085 vessels and 20,- 
033,884 tons in 1913. 

Tlie number of vessels under the British 
flag included in the total for 1920 was 235'), 
and the tonnage 10,838,842 tons net (or 
61.7 per cent of the tonnage for all flags). 
They are grouped under the following cate- 
gories : 

Net 

Number. tonnage. 

Merchant vessels i..,i 7,066,043 

Mail Steamers L69 1,10 

Warships and transp : L,078,871 

Government chartered vessels 146 

Vessels in ballast 250 

I 2,359 10,838,842 

Of the total net tonnage passing through 
the canal in 1020 Japanese vessels ac- 
counted for 9.1 per cent, Dutch for 8.1 per 
tut and French for 4.4 per cent. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



UNEMPLOYMENT IN GALVESTON 



The Galveston agent of the Marine 
Cooks' and Stewards' Association of tin- 
Atlantic and Gulf sends some very inter- 
esting facts relative to the unemployment 
situation in that port. He states that there 
are over 500 seamen on the beach with 
little prospects or opportunities for them. 
The city officials seem to have adopted the 
usual methods of meeting the problem by 
harrassing, and deporting the jobless out 
of the cit\'. and as usual, in a case like this. 
where politicians* interests conflict with 
that of the workers, the latter are unable 
to get their side before the public. 

The Following correspondence, and clip- 
ping from the Houston Press, give some 
slight idea as to what is transpiring. 



Police Department of the 

City of Galveston 
Galveston, Texas. Sept. 6. 1921. 
To the President and Secretary of 
the Cooks" and Mess Boys' Union: 

This is to notify you that from and after 
this date you must not permit anyone to 
sleep in the hall as this is a violation of 
the law. By order of 

J. O. STEVENS* 'X. 

Chief of Police. 



Galveston. Texas. Sept. 7, 1921. 
To Mr. J. O. Stephenson, 
Chief of Police, 
Galveston, Texas. 
Dear Sir: 

I am in receipt of your letter of notifica- 
tion, and will endeavor to answer it in a 
true spirit of a fellow citizen. 

First <>f all, we have no men sleeping- in 
our hall, and what union members we have 
ashore spend most of their time in our 
hall, which is their home while they are in 
port. 

I am given to understand that your 
campaign of ridding the seamen from this 
fair city originated from some Spanish 
seamen that were caught burglarising a 
local residence a few nights ago. 

Are we all to be judged and branded by 
the acts of the two men your department 
arrested? I will venture to say that those 
two men were not true seamen. While it 
is my duty to protect our members. I will 
go the limit to see that they get Justice. 
The average seaman is not a crook, nor 
he depend upon the citizens of this 
community for support, for when a seaman 
is in trouble he will either go to his local 
representative or to a fellow comrade for 
support «>r relief, and T will defy any citi- 
zen of this community to step to the front 
and make a statement of seamen asking- 
support from our citizens. 

When a scainan comes into port he 
makes the union hall his home, which is 
kept up by him on a pro-rata basis. At 
this time being we have some members 
ashore through no fault of their own, as 
when some of the vessels returned to Gal- 
veston they have been'sent to the "Bone 
Yard" and this puts many men on the 
beach here. They are not allowed to take 
a job Ion a ship) from the dock under any 
circumstances, as that is a ruling given out 
bv the United States Sea Service Bureau. 
Tie must then ship through their bureau, 
and 1 would like to know how some of 
these jobs are given to the men. 



On all Shipping Board ships, Americans 
are given first preference, which is quite 
natural and in accordance of our country's 
policy, but on the other hand we have 
hundreds of first class seamen that have 
not as yet become full citizens, that have 
answered the call of this country during 
the war. .and now the slackening up of 
shipping has become in effect, so these men 
are no longer wanted. With the hundreds 
of vessels that have paid their crews off 
in Galveston, most of the business houses 
have enjoyed benefits from the business 
derived from the spendings of the hard 
earned money of the men that go down 
to the sea in ships, and now that times 
have become a little hard and the men 
are meeting with a little difficulty in 
securing places on ships they are to be 
hounded from place to place and face 
charges of vagrancy until they are cleared 
out of this port. 

What are you going to do about it? If 
we are to live under the same methods 
used while this city was under martial 
law then let's tell the public so. 

We have a grand city, and I think we 
will do better by ridding it of the gambling- 
house and bootlegging saloons (commonlv 
known as Blind Tigers) instead of chasing 
the seamen that helps to keep the chain 
of the commercial world linked together. 

Thanking you, I remain 

Very respectfully yours. 

CHAS. F. BULLOCK, 

Business Agent. 

Galveston Deports Unemployed Seamen 

Another unusual thing has happened at 
Galveston, and no report has so far 
appeared in either of the two daily papers. 
The same condition of unemployment still 
exists. 

Now it appears that the police are en- 
gaged in the laudable endeavor to drive 
the Mexican crooks and redlight habitues 
and Chinese gamblers out of town, but 
they do not seem to be able to discriminate 
between hard working, honest men out of 
work and the ordinary crap-shooting 
colored element. 

On Monday night it seems that three 
men broke into the residence of Henry 
Betssner. Two were caught, who said that 
they had been at the firemen's hall, accord- 
ing to one report, at the sailors' hall. 
according to another. Then on Monday 
night about 11:30 both the firemen's and 
sailors' halls were raided and 57 men were 
dragged out who were inoffensively sleep- 
ing on the tloors because they had no other 
place to go and no money to pay room 
rent. They were lined up in the police 
station by Night Sergeant Defferari and 
after a short questioning as to names 17 
were allowed to go. 

Deported Without Trial 

The other 40 were taken in the city's 
automobile to the causeway and there 
dumped and told not to show themselves 
in Galveston again. The sergeant ordered 
the half dozen police officers in attendance 
to look them over thoroughly and arrest 
any at sight that might be found on the 
streets afterwards. 

No attention was paid to the baggage 
and other property of these men. Xo court 
hearing was held. Xo charges were p 
ferred. Xo warrants of any kind were 
issued. The union officials were told at 



the time and later not to allow any of the 
men to congregate in the halls after 9 
o'clock at night, and if any were found 
they would be promptly arrested. 

Thus it appears as if the night sergeant 
had all at once become prosecuting attor- 
ney, judge, jury and executioner, in deport- 
ing harmless, inoffensive, plain working 
men outside of the city limits without giv- 
ing them a chance to carry along even any 
of their clothes. 

Congressman Notified 

The writer interviewed Clay S. Briggs, 
our Congressman, and asked him the plain, 
blunt question whether the 1'. S. Constitu- 
tion is still in effect in Texas and Galves- 
ton. ITc was horrified to learn of these 
details of minor police officers' usurpation 
of authority, and said it was not in his 
official line <<\ duty. Tie said that depor- 
tation beyond the city limits without hear- 
or trial is not Americanism, that peac- 
able assembly rights had not yet been 
abolished, and he believed that the city 
commissioners and Grand Jury should in- 
vestigate the proceedings. 

The writer interviewed Mayor Keenan. 
He also was completely in ignorance of the 
facts, especially as he had been out of 
town for several days and had not yet 
received official police reports of any kind. 
lb -aid that in his written and verbal in- 
structions to the police department they 
wire given a natural and necessary amount 
of judgment in enforcing the laws regard- 
ing minor infractions, but he stated posi- 
tively that he had not authorized any 
deportations, or trial by police sergeants, 
or condemnation without public hearing. 
He assured the writer that he was glad to 
learn the facts in the case and would start 
ati investigation at once. 

No Place to Go 

I am privately informed by the men 
interested that many of them have come 
back. They have no place to go. The 
only friends they have within the range of 
a thousand miles arc lure. Their only 
chance to get a night's L - here in 

tin- poor shelter of the union halls. Their 
only chance to get a bite to eat is from 
the ships in the harbor, where they occa- 
sionally get a handout. Sailors do not beg 
from townspeople as a rule. Their only 
other chance for a meal or a loaf of bread 
is from some friendly sailor's restaurant or 
bakery in the district where they congre- 
gate. And there they must congregate, be- 
cause there is where the captains and 
mates of vessels look for men to work. 

Again it is pertinent to inquire is this 
all we can afford to do in this boasted era 
of civilization"' Do we wish to maltreat 
-t men to the point of making tramps 
and thieves out of them deliberately ?—B) 
Dan Morgan. 



(From Galveston Daily News) 
The United States Shipping Hoard will 
be asked by the Hoard of City Commis- 
sioners to amend certain regulations apply- 
ing to the employment of American sea- 
men only on Shipping Board vessels, in 
order to alleviate the condition said to 
exist here because of the large number of 
unemployed foreign seamen stranded in 
Galveston. Mayor Charles A. Keenan and 
City Attorney Frank S. .Anderson were 
empowered to draft suitable resolutions to 
be presented to the Shipping Board, fob 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



lowing a plea made in behalf of the desti- 
tute foreign seamen by Rev. J. F. Sarner, 
chaplain of the Adoue Seamen's Bethel, 
which is caring for more than 500 men of 
all nationalities. 

Tn outlining the destitution of the 
stranded men, Rev. Mr. Sarner explained 
that the men were left here when the 
Shipping Board ordered employment of 
American sailors only, and when a large 
number of the Shipping Board vessels were 
placed out of service. The Seamen's 
Bethel has given more than 2000 free 
lodgings to the men during the past four 
months. 

Suggestions were offered by Mr. Sarner 
that the city could probably prevail upon 
the Shipping Board to permit each ship 
leaving the port to take a few men out at 
a time. He declared that the men are 
ablebodied and eager to work. While ap- 
preciating the fact that citizens should be 
given the preference in the matter of labor, 
means should be devised to give them em- 
ployment with winter approaching. Mr. 
Sarner declared that the situation will be 
more accentuated with the number of 
Great Lakes sailors and others coming 
down from the East on their annual pil- 
grimage. By Christmas there will be 
approximately two thousand idle seamen 
in Galveston, he predicted. 



SAFEGUARDING CHILD WORKERS 



REFLECTIONS OF AN "OLD-TIMER" 

An examination of the capitalist method 
of production and distribution is remark- 
able for the fact that the average wage 
slave accepts the statements and almost 
everything else put forward by the master 
class as gospel truth. To him everything 
appears ordained, which shows the evil 
and danger of taking only a superficial 
view of things. Everything on the surface 
appears right and reasonable to the slave, 
but a scrutiny below the surface would 
reveal surprising contradiction, not to say 
illusions. 

If the slave has the good fortune ( ?) 
to hold down a job he generally shows a 
deplorable lack of perception as to the 
manner in which he is skinned to a 
frazzle. After furnishing his labor power 
to the boss for a specified time, the latter 
hands him certain dirty looking pieces of 
paper, or coins, which, to his mind, have 
the magical facilities of transformation 
into food, clothing and shelter; but what 
it really represents is a demand on other 
workers' services, for corned beef, shoddy 
clothes and a rented room. 

With seamen a slightly different set of 
rules operate. 

Whereas, shore workers are permitted a 
certain amount of freedom when quitting 
work, the seaman is cribbed, cabined and 
confined aboard the vessel he may happen 
to have shipped on, sometimes for lengthy 
periods. All the amenities of social inter- 
course are denied, while the traditions and 
customs of seafaring life weigh heavily 
upon him. However, if he has been gifted 
with a brain equal to that of a Ilea, he 
should note the manner in which the 
skinning process is camouflaged. 

JAMES CHAFPEY, 1309, 
Vancouver, B. C. 



How one State has developed unique 
methods of protecting her youngest wage- 
earners is shown in a report just issued 
by the U. S. Department of Labor, 
through the Children's Bureau, describing 
the employment-certificate system in Wis- 
consin. This report is the fourth of a 
series dealing with the administration of 
child-labor laws, previous reports having 
summarized methods of administration in 
Connecticut, Maryland and New York. 

In Wisconsin the State Industrial Com- 
mission has control over both the issuance 
of employment certificates and the inspec- 
tion of industrial establishments. It has 
general supervision over the officers grant- 
ing working permits and also has sole au- 
thority to appoint these officers. This 
centralized authority is strengthened by 
the commission's power to interpret legis- 
lation through its own rules and regula- 
tions, which are legally binding. More- 
over, the commission's work of protecting 
children from illegal employment is made 
more effective by its power to bring civil 
action, instead of only criminal, for nearly 
all child-labor violations: the employer 
may thus be made to testify and to 
produce his records. 

Children between fourteen and seven- 
teen years of age must secure permits be- 
fore they can enter industrial employ- 
ment, and are afforded special protection 
in their work. This is a higher age than 
that prevailing in most States. All impor- 
tant cities and towns in the State main- 
tain vocational schools, at which part-time 
attendance of all employed children be- 
tween fourteen and seventeen years of age 
is compulsory. The Industrial Commis- 
sion is represented on the Board for Voca- 
tional Education. The apprentice laws. 
requiring in connection with shop experi- 
ence a certain amount of formal instruc- 
tion, together with the vocational school 
system, give Wisconsin a unique oppor- 
tunity for leadership in the vocational 
training movement. 

In spite of its many advantages, the 
Wisconsin law has several weak points, 
the most serious being that physical ex- 
aminations of children entering industry 
are not required ; however, such examina- 
tions are now made mandatory in the 
largest city, Milwaukee, by order of the 
industrial Commission. 

The possibility of a child's working with- 
out a permit is reduced to a minimum by 
an exceptional provision of the workmen's 
compensation law. If a child of permit 
age is injured while working without a 
permit or in a prohibited occupation, his 
employer must pay three times the com- 
pensation ordinarily required and he can- 
not protect himself from this additional 
risk through insurance. The fear of this 
clause and the operation of the minimum 
wage law have resulted, the Industrial 
Commission reports, in a decrease in the 
number of employed children. The number 
of employed children is likely to be de- 
creased still further through the Opera- 
tion of laws passed at the 1921 session of 
the Legislature. 



PULLING DOWN THE FLAG 



American railroad managers have con- 
spired with foreign shipping interests to 
destroy and drive off the seas the Amer- 
ican merchant marine. Senator Wesley L. 
Jones, chairman of the Senate committee 
on commerce, charges in a statement in 
which he reviews evidence upon which 
his deductions are based. 

Senator Jones has sent the report, 
which he describes as having been made 
by an "experienced railroad man tremen- 
dously interested in the upbuilding of the 
merchant marine," to Chairman Lasker of 
the Shipping Board with a request that 
earnest consideration be given to sugges- 
tions the report contains. 

The conspiracies of railroad managers 
and foreign shipping companies, or Amer- 
ican lines with foreign connections, have 
resulted in tying up the great bulk of the 
United States Shipping Board vessels, 
Senator Jones says. 

A study of the situation by the Shipping 
Hoard, the report continues, will show 
that, due to the large fleets of foreign flag 
vessels, operated by the companies with 
which the trunk lines have established 
contracts, these concerns have been able 
to control, at the expense of Shipping 
Board vessels, transportation of "hundreds, 
if not thousands, of cargoes, aggregating 
man}- millions of tons of freight on which 
the revenue has totaled hundreds of 
millions of dollars." 

Secret Contracts Available 

ldie discovery of these secret contracts 
and their enforced filing with the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission, which is 
now required, would enable the Shipping 
Board, in the opinion of Senator Jones, 
"to definitely determine the principal 
cause for the success of foreign flag 
vessels in transporting approximately two- 
thirds of our export and import sea-borne 
commerce." 

Senator Lasker is advised that if he will 
investigate he will find that railway man- 
agers have used their influence in favor 
of foreign ships and against ships that fly 
the American flag. 

■ There is, according to Senator Jones, 
adequate existing law to deal with this 
destructive form of treason against the 
national interests. If the Shipping Board 
and the Interstate Commerce will co- 
operate the whole conspiracy can be 
shown up, and then it will be clearly 
established why American vessels have 
suffered so much during the past two or 
three years. 

This is an old story, and it was given 
attention by LABOR shortly after the 
railroads were returned to private man- 
agement. It was then pointed out that 
the great trunk line roads were voiding 
regulations made by the government 
while it operated transportation that had 
for their purpose the curtailment of dis- 
criminatory practices that reacted bene- 
ficially to foreign flags. 

There was at that time some protest 
from Southern Ports, which, during the 
period of Federal control for the first 
time, received anything like a fair deal 
from the railroads. Nothing apparently 
has been done to correct this condition. 



"Do It Xow I" is a good slogan, in con- 
nection with attending meetings. 



Inefficient seamen in the coastwise trade 
make it necessary for the others to be 
more careful. 



When purchasing a sea slock, always try 
to obtain union goods. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WASHINGTON LETTER 
(By Laurence Todd) 



Plutes Show Contempt for Labor 

Five trade union representatives have 
graciously been invited by Mr. Hoover to 
sit in President Harding's conference of 
thirty-eight "best minds" to solve the 
problem of unemployment when nearly 
six million men and women are looking 
in vain for jobs with which to support 
themselves and their dependents this 
winter. 

Five out of thirty-eighl is the ratio, and 
not even all of these five can he called 
progressives. The American labor move- 
ment knows now what the Harding ad- 
ministration thinks of its importance to 
the solution of the problems of labor 
itself. The sentiment may be described 
as one of benevolent contempt. 

Eighteen business men. most of them 
known for their anti-labor and anti-public 
activities, are on the: list. So, also, are 
Hoover and Secretary of Labor Davis— 
neither of whom can be classed as pro- 
labor, and eleven assorted citizens of 
present or past neutral or liberal view- 
point. Finally, there are two former labor 
officials who are generally reported to be 
on the bosses' side. This is the collection 
of individuals picked out by Mr. Hoover 
to begin sessions here on September 26 to 
reach a solution of the unemployment 
question. On the face of the facts as to 
the makeup of the conference, it is safe to 
predict that it will do nothing of impor- 
tance to the safety of the working class of 
the United States. 

Labor Poorly Represented 

Samuel Gompers, president, and Mat- 
thew Woll, eighth vice-president, will 
speak for the A. F. of L. Secretary Mor- 
rison has been left out. W. S. Carter will 
speak for the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Firemen and F.nginemen, of which he is 
president, and John L. Lewis, president of 
the United Mine Workers of America, 
will speak for the coal miners if the 
biennial convention of his union, in session 
at Indianapolis, docs not require his atten- 
tion. Miss Elizabeth Christman will rep- 
resent both the International Glove Work- 
ers' Union, of which she is secretary, and 
the National Women's Trade Union 
League, of which she is secretary- 
treasurer. 

T. V. O'Connor of the Shipping Board, 
former head of the Longshoremen, and 
Edgar Clark, recently chairman of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission and at 
one time president of the Order of Rail- 
way Conductors, are the ex-labor officials. 
O'Connor gained notoriety by notifying 
the Seamen, last June, that the Shipping 
Board, for which he then spoke, would not 
permit any business agent of any union 
to go on board its ships in port, nor even 
get on to the docks. He was an original 
Harding booster. 

Hope Lies With Liberal Citizens 
There arc some fair-minded men among 
the citizens midway between the labor and 
the employer groups in this conference. 
There is Dr. Leiserson, formerly of Wis- 
consin, now impartial chairman between 
the Amalgamated Clothing Workers and 
their employers in Xew York City and 
Rochester for the settlement of arbitra- 
tion appeals. There is Dr. Charles P. 
Xeill, former Commissioner of Labor Sta- 



tistics; there is Miss Ida Tarbell, who 
earned the hatred of Standard Oil by her 
history of that corporation; there is Miss 
Mary Van Kleek. former chief of the 
Women's Division in the Department of 
Labor. Mayor Couzcns of Detroit and 
.Mayor Peters of Boston are supposed to 
be neutral. 

Labor's Enemies Prominent 
enemies of labor are very prom- 
inent in Mr. Hoover's selection of best 
minds. Charley Schwab, who has not yet 
explained the loss of certain money han- 
dled by him for the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration, is one of the big figures. Then 
there is John H. Kirby of Bogalusa Lum- 
notoriety, specialist in "treat-'em- 
rough" handling of labor organizers in the 
South. There is Edgerton, president of 
the National Association of Manufacturers, 
and DeFrees, president of the U. S. Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and Markham, president 
of the Illinois Central Railroad. Field of 
the Pittsburgh Coal Company is backed 
b] Posten of the New York Coal Com- 
pany, Jackson Johnson of the International 
Shoe Company and Julius Barnes, the big 
wheat trader. Xew England textile mills 
and Michigan iron mines are represented, 
along with banks and building contractors 
and furnace manufacturers. 

After announcing that the sessions 
would be open, Mr. Hoover explained that 
he had selected an Advisory Economic 
Committee of twenty experts who would 
it to the conference at its first ses- 
sion a plan of agenda, and that the con- 
ference would then break up into commit- 
tor real work. These committees, he 
said, would seek the co-operation of fur- 
ther representatives of labor, empl< 
and civic bodies in getting at a report. 
But it is to be noticed that organized labor 
will be able to muster only a handful of 
in the showdown as to the findings 
of the conference. 

Such Conference Futile 
Two years ago the country waited with 
genuine interest for the meeting of l 
dent Wilson's First Industrial Conference, 
in which the three ecptal delegations were 
n by and actually represented the 
dominant organizations of labor and of 
the employers and by the administration 
as spokesman for the general public. At 
that time it was the steel workers' strike 
that gave point to the gathering, and it 
was hoped by many even of the trade 
union officials that Judge Gary and his 
associates would see the wisdom of yield- 
ing to the moral judgment of the na 
lint Gary knew the power of aggregate 
and insolent wealth, and he broke up the 
conference by asserting the superior au- 
thority of dollars over human lives. Under 
the law he. could do this, and he claimed 
his legal pound of flesh. 

Two years have gone, and again labor 
and aggregate and haughty capital meet 
under the call of the President of the 
United States. But now labor is not 
there in equal numbers and with 

is. It is there as an orphaned poor 
relation, on sufferance, while the power- 
ding heap of dollars from which spring 
Schwab and Kirby and DeFrees and 
erton becomes an altar at which cabi- 
net chiefs bow down. 

Five spokesmen of organized labor will 
sit in this strange gathering to discuss 
the misery and want and humiliation and 



rising anger of six million of their adult 
fellow-Americans. Looking back to the 
conference of 1919 and then looking at 
this assemblage, it may be that Samuel 
Gompers and W. S. Carter and John 
Lewis will find words to recall the warning 
of Daniel to Belshazzar. Or — they may 
not. 

Railroad Situation Doubtful 
Meanwhile the railroad crisis slowly de- 
The shop crafts have authorized 
their officers to declare a strike. President 
Jewell of the Railway Fmployes' Depart- 
ment of the A. F. of L., announces that 
the officers await the decision of the Rail- 
way Labor Board upon the working rules. 
They wait, also, for the decision of the 
chiefs of the transportation brotherhoods 
as to whether they shall order the strike 
which has been authorized in the referen- 
dum of their membership. 

Some of the railroad men believe that 
a strike will lie made unnecessary by the 
general public, in case the public wakes 
up to the fact that a dangerous shortage in 
coal supply for the coming winter exists. 
Buyers have held off, mines have not pro- 
duced, and winter is near. Railway tracks 
and rolling stock are in worst disrepair 
than ever before, while the need for heavy 
traffic in coal from the mines to distant 
parts of the country is going to be acute. 
Someone, they say, is going to freeze to 
death for lack of coal. Then the public 
will begin to make protests, and finally 
Congress will have to take the properties 
over in order to rush the repair of equip- 
ment ami the movement of coal. 

If this theory be borne out by experience 
the railroad unions would prefer that the 
public find them working, so that their 
threat to strike may be put behind the 
demand of the public that the wasteful 
and incompetent private control of the 
railroads be ended. They say it is doubt- 
ful if the companies can get the money 
ssary to repair the equipment, since 
half a billion dollars of the cash surplus 
been paid out in the past year as 
dividends, leaving very little money on 
hand for emergency uses. 

No Justice for Labor 
West Virginia's coal operators are pre- 
paring the next scene in the labor trag- 
edy in that State. The Logan County 
Grand Jury has indicted four hundred 
strikers on charges of murder, and one 
hundred more on lesser charges. Presi- 
dent Kecncy and Secretary Mooney of 
district 17, U. M. W. A., have surrendered 
and are in jail under murder indictments. 
Yet Lively, the Felts gunman and known 
murderer of Sid liatiield and Ed. Cham- 
bers, is not even under arrest. 

The murders charged against the trade 
unionists are, of course, the killing of the 
two or three gunmen who fell in their 
attacks on the outlawed and hounded 
strikers and their families. 



Organized Labor holds as a moral 
principle that inasmuch as all workers em- 
ployed reap the advantage and secure the 
benefits from the efforts, costs and sacri- 
fice- of the ( h-ganized Labor movement, 
they should become members thereof and 
bear their part in the duties and obliga- 
tions of which they arc- beneficial ii -. 



Attend your Union meetings. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



FOREIGN INTRIGUE EXPOSED 
(Continued from Page 3) 



not have been some other lines within their 
control. 

The manner in which this indirect British 
control continues at the present time is sug- 
gested l>y the personnel of the three new 
directors of operations in the present Shipping 
Board — Smull, Love, and Frey — comment upon 
whose appointments taken from the New v ork 
Journal of Commerce of July 14, jus! last 
month. 1 now place before Senators showing 
how entirely satisfactory to foreign interests is 
the appointment of these three men by the 
present Shipping Board. Mark you, J. Barstow 
Smull and William J. Love were in important 
positions under the old Shipping Board in con- 
nection with the direction of operations and 
the chartering of vessels. 

The Journal of Commerce said on July 14, 
1921: 

"There was genuine delight in shipping circles 
yesterday over the appointment of William J. 
Love, J. Barstow Smull, and A. J. Frey as 
members of the new operating committtee for 
the Shipping Board. Not only were American 
interests pleased by the action taken, but the 
directors of foreign lines expressed great satis- 
faction." 

And so forth. 

Mr. President, I know thai many Senators 
upon this floor have received letters of severest 
complaint and stricture upon those appoint- 
ments, from owners of independent lines who 
have suffered the destruction of their business 
and the discrimination of the Shipping Board 
through these same men when they were in 
official positions before, and who know their 
connection and their affiliation with British 
shipping organizations. 

Mr. President, in connection with the ap- 
pointment of these three men by the new- 
Shipping Board to these positions of great 
power, really the directors of operations, the 
men who were in charge of all the movements 
of the shipping facilities that we have been 
expending these vast amounts of money to 
create, 1 wish to say this: The connection of 
Mr. Smull with the firm of J. II. Winchester 
& Co., steamship agents and ship brokers, estab- 
lished in 1856, which has direct connection and 
affiliation with British interests, the connection 
of Mr. Love with the International Mercantile 
Marine, which has the tie-ups to which I have 
directed the attention of the Senate through the 
contracts, and the connection for many years of 
Mr. A. J. Frey, who has received appointment 
by the new Shipping Board, with the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Co., which is one of the large 
British shipping companies, are all important, 
and I mention them now in connection with a 
proceeding that was started about a week or 
ten days ago by the Shipping Board, evidently 
with these very men behind it and pushing it 
forward, to dispossess of its Shipping Board 
vessels what appears from newspaper statements 
to be a purely American shipping company, 
the United States Mail Steamship Co., a com- 
pany that had taken over from the old Ship- 
ping Board a number of vessels under contracts 
which provided that they should be overhauled 
and that certain allowances were to be made 
for them. 

Senators may have noticed that the United 
States Shipping Board just a few days ago, 
under court proceedings through the United 
States marshal, took possession of those vessels 
that were under the contracts made between 
the old Shipping Board and the United States 
Mail Steamship Co., and gave out that they 
had violated their contract; that they were 
behind in their rentals; and that the Shipping 
Board was starting in to make a clean-up for 
the new order of things. 

What happened? The shipping company made 
a public statement that every dollar of the 
money which was invested in their business was 
the money of American citizens; that they were 
trying to build up a truly American line; that 
they owned some ships of their own; that they 
had taken those ships of the American Ship- 
ping l'.oard under the contract made with the 
old Shipping Board; that they were proceeding 
as best they could under the circumstances to 
recondition those ships for overseas service; 
that during the time that they were engaged 
in reconditioning them the shipping conditions 
underwent a great depression; that, however, 
they were- within their contract rights, because 
it was provided that if any occasion arose for 
differences with respect to contract rights there 
should be arbitration; and that they were not 
going to surrender to this movement on the 
part of the new Shipping hoard. Their charges 
are openly made in the press reports. 

Mr. I 'resident, it is charged openly in the 
press of this country and other countries that 
this movement on the part of the Shipping 
Board was instigated by foreign interests, rep- 
resented through their officials, who had the 
old-time affiliations with British shipping; that 
they were reaching out, through the power of 
the federal Government, to throttle a real 
American organization, which wanted to put 
the American flag on the high seas, and that 
was doing it very successfully; that had its 
lines operating and breaking in for the first time 
in history on the great ocean-carrying trade of 



foreign governments in the passenger service, 
as was shown by the figures which they gave. 

Mr. President, I repeat, they stated that they 
were within their contract rights, and that they 
would fight the Shipping Board to the last 
ditch to hold on to those vessels. I observe 
that an injunction, which was temporarily 
granted to restrain the United States Mail 
Steamship Co. from operating those ships, was 
dissolved and that they are in possession of 
the ships. 

If the Shipping Board does not back down 
completely, as it has been backed off the 
boards in their first attempt to secure out of 
hand control of those vessels, the matter will 
have to be fought out at length. I trust that 
some of the facts which are stated in the 
newspaper accounts will be developed in court, 
in order that we may have that aid in ascer- 
taining just how much our new Shipping 
Board is being imposed upon by British and 
other foreign interests. 

The Problem That Confronts Us 

The question which is confronting the country 
today respecting our merchant marine is much 
larger than any question of graft or incompe- 
tence on the part of any officials who have 
been connected with the Shipping Board. Brit- 
ish intluence and British power could not keep 
us from our rightful place upon the seas if she 
had not cleverly made it for the interests of 
our own shipping concerns and financial insti- 
tutions to continue British supremacy upon the 
seas. British propaganda and British intrigue 
can do no harm when we know it and recognize 
it for what it is. hut when it comes to us 
from our own people, through our own press, 
and even through our own public officials, then, 
indeed, it does harm. 

You may ask, What are we going to do 
about it? My answer is that the first thing 
we should do about it is to find out the facts. 
1 believe that the conditions existing in the 
International Mercantile Marine Co. are typical 
of those existing mainly in all our great ship- 
ping companies, upon the patriotism and loyalty 
of which we are counting to build up an Ameri- 
can merchant marine. The first thing to do 
is to conduct a searching investigation into 
the whole subject and sec what the relations 
are between the shipping and transportation 
interests of this country and Great Britain. 
If the conditions are such as I have shown to 
exist in the case of this one company, then 
we should do what we ought to do in the case 
of this company — we should compel it to di- 
vorce itself absolutely from British ship] 
interests if it wishes to continue in business 
as an American shipping company. It can not 
serve two masters. It can not be bound by 
contracts or by self interest to serve and pro- 
mote British shipping and at the same time 
serve and promote our own shipping, which 
is in direct competition with that of Great 
Britain. You may say the remedy is drastic. 
1 answer that the disease calls for a drastic 
remedy. If we are to build up an American 
merchant marine, we must have the absolute 
loyalty of every person engaged in that enter- 
prise from seaman to shipowner. There must 
be no divided allegiance. The crews must be 
American seamen, the officers must be American 
officers, and the ships must be American owned 
and free to meet the competition of Great 
Britain and all other countries in a legitimate 
struggle for our portion of the maritime com- 
merce of the world. 



[IllillllllUlllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII § 

| Interna 'c ior.nl Seamen's Union | 
| of America | 

niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 

LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAK 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark 

K. B. NOLAN, Secretary 
THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 
Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. V GEORGE HANSEN. 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN. 

1501 Columbus Road 

MILWAUKEE, Wis CHAS. BRADHERING, 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich WM. DONNELLY. 

410 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR. O J. W. ELLISON, 

74 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. T 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

CONNEAUT, O 

992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio S. R. DYE, 

618 P'ront Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 

3308 East Ninety-second Street 

SUPERIOR, Wis WM. EDGEWORTH, 

724 Tower Avenue 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 5) 



companies can be forced to return the im- 
migrants, but the law can not compel them 
to return passage money to the victimized 
immigrants, who are in many cases driven 
to distraction and hysteria when they dis- 
cover conditions here. 

It is suggested that Congress pass legis- 
lation providing for a fine of $200 against 
the companies for every alien above the 
quota brought overseas and also compel 
them to refund to the immigrants the price 
of their passage. 



The Canal Traffic Heavy 
Despite the world-wide trade depression 
which held during the fiscal year 1921, a 
new high record was established for Ameri- 
can tonnage passage through the Panama 
Canal. In a total of 2892 ships traversing 
the waterway, 1212 were American, exclu- 
sive of Government-owned and chartered 
vessels. The nearest competitor of the 
United States was Great Britain, whose 
flag appeared on 970 ships carrying 3,722,- 
000 ton, against 5,179,000 tons freighted 
under American colors. 



ES 

Street 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

..Agent 

.-Agent 

Agent 

..Agent 

Agent 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 71 Main Street 

THOS. CONWAY. Secretary 

ED. HICKS. Treasurer 

Phone Seneca 48 

CLEVELAND, 819 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE. Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 410 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 35 West Eagle Street 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 
Telephone Seneca 896 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 CKy Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 671 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 66 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box «T 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 1016 First Avenue, South 

P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore Room 21, Alnsworth Building 

SAN PEDRO. Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 674 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 86 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 68 Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 41 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 118 

DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca Street 

rCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box IIS 

FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. .DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 
STOCKTON, Cal Labor Temple 

FISH TRAP PILE DRIVERS AND WEB WORKERS 

OF PUGET SOUND AND ALASKA 

1316 Dock Street, Bellingham, Washington 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



The meat cutters and butcher 
workmen of Trenton, X. J., have 
organized and are preparing to im- 
prove working conditions. 

Opposition to wage cuts was re- 
corded by the United Textile Work- 
ers at its annual convention. Atten- 
tion was called to newspaper propa- 
ganda of employers, who are mold- 
ing a public opinion to lower v, 

The National Unemployment Con- 
ference opened at Washington last 
Monday. A mass of data was pre- 
pared for use of the conference and 
it is expected to take up formulation 
of a permanent policy for meeting 
unemployment. 

Recommendations on the question 
of a pardon for Eugene V. Debs, 
lis) leader imprisoned at .Atlanta 
for violation of war laws, may be 
sent to President Harding next 
week. Attorney-General Daugherty 
slated recently that the recommenda- 
tion'- have been completed. 

The Pullman Car Company has 
d its first agreement with or- 
ganized labor. The contract is be- 
tween the company and System Fed- 
eration No. 122 of the A. F. of L. 
Railway Employes' Department, and 
closes a long dispute between the 
two parties. The company organized 
a 'union" in an effort to defeat the 
trade unionists. 

The American Legion estimates 
that there are 600,000 unemployed 
ex-service men in this country. The 
Legion reminds business men of 
lises made to these boys when 
they enlisted, and employers arc 
called upon "to loosen their purse 
strings, lengthen their vision and 
make jobs for the men who kepi 
American business safe from a Ger- 
man indemnity." 

Ignoring instructions sent by in- 
ternational officers, Local No. 31, 
Structural Iron Workers of San 
Francisco voted to join the building 
construction branch of the "rank and 
file." As a result of this action the 
local expected its charter would be 
revoked, as Local Xo. 78 of San 
Francisco and Local 117 of Oakland 
have been suspended for failure to 
heed the warnings of the interna- 
tional officers. 

Thirty-eight coal miners, whom of- 
ficers declare were gathering, masked 
and armed, in a field about a mile 
from Spadra, Arkansas, one night 
last week, were arrested and eh 
with night riding. The sheriff 
he had been told that the nun 
planned to march from their meet 
ing place to the Strip Pit of the 
Spadra mine, where non-union labor 
is employed and blow up the pit and 
all machinery there. The men, the 
sheriff said, came to the field in pairs 
or groups of three and four, and as 
they arrived were arrested and dis- 
armed. All but seven of the thirty- 
eight men have been released on 
bond, fixed at $1000 each. 

The third week of the strike of 
California oil workers is marked by 
the determination of the workers to 
meet any contingency. The men arc- 
preparing for a long struggle and 
have perfected a powerful machine. 
In addition to signal corps, con- 
ducted by ex-service men, an air- 
plane has been secured for scouting 
operations. Each of the seven li 
which are on strike has organized 
what is known as the "second line 
of defense." This is an organization 
of mothers, wives, daughters and 
is of the strikers into a woman's 
auxiliary. These women are credited 
with being responsible for the splen- 
did morale of the strikers. 



Office Phone Main 2665 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



DENTIST 

Hours: 9 a. m. to «:30 p. m. 

EUGENE PAYNE, M.D., D.D.S. 

At 3 Fourth St. Mezzanine Floor 

California Theatre Building 
Market St. Corner Fourth St. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL, 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1— Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

filler a rule adopted by the Seattle 

Uiee. letters addressed in eare of 

the Bailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 

lint be held longer than 30 days from 

Ivery, [f members are unable 

i ill or have their mail forwaded 

during tl ut period, they should notify 
I to hold mall until arrived. 

i, Geo. W. Bei t 

Andersen, C. B. i lei man 

i ,,,,:, i (scar K mlstra, Sum 

d, A. M. Kaa, Xils 

on, II. Keai ney, Hush 

Anderson, A. C. Kuhlman, A 

on, G. B. Kereher, Wm. 

son, John Krakila, Alfred 

Abrahamson, c. A. Kane, C. 

Anderson, Albert Cretchman, Max 

Vnderson, Andrew Kolodze I 

Anderson, W. C. Kelly. A. .1. 

Vekerman, Anton Kother, H. 

in. S. M. Karlson, K". 
Arstad, B. 

fohn 

Berg, <;. W. Law, H. C. 

Blackman, Arthur Leskinen. John 

r, R. H. Lyslad, John 

Behring, C. Lovendal. I ete 

Bjorkqvest, R. Lund, Hjalmar 

Barry, Wm. Leskinen, Y/rja, 
Burton, A. G. John 

s, J, w. 

i'.uis. Wm. Lundmerh, Gista 

ink, E. T. Lokl 

m, K. C. 

ont, Joe Langen, John 
Blmngren, A. 

■e) Lindekranz, C, 

IMlal: i Line, T 

, F. I Incoln, H. A. 

R. M. I ' P. 

Baulianl, F. A. 

McCail, G. W. 
Christensen, Aug. Mikkelsen, K. -1G_'0 
Calmark, B. G. >d, Angus 

McDonnell, M. 
I i trold Moherg, Alf 

bell, Andrew Mayer, F. M. 
Caldwell Meza, Jose 

Carr, Boh Mattson, Olaf 

,, e. Magnusen, Nils 
Carlson, Wm. 

i. hell. C. Nelson. Kmil 

..,-, l. c. Nicholsen, Chas. 

m, Rudolf X. '■ e, J, 

has. Ni< Isi n, C J. P. 

Ni l.-nn. I>. J. 
B. R. A. 

i yerland Erik Nerberg, J. E. 

id J. W. Nielsen, N. C -1 --I 

Nyman. John 
. M. Ness, IT. 

in, .John x. B. 

Erickson, i 

i. B. Olsen, C. -1412 

n, B. rens 

Carl ' '• J- 

Edwards, John >, M. 

Ericksen, Xils Oste 

iri 
Fleming, M. Chris 

O'Connor, B. L. 
Gordon, Arthur e i, P. 10 

'Irin .l.i I 

< lis. 'II, I ll.'lf 

( lundersen, J. Ihristoffer 

Goughan, Thos. H. 

Griffiths, Ben Olsson, Julius 
ill-- ii. 

[ngvald 

Frank Petersen, C 

3, a. Petersen, i ienry 

Harris, John P. Petersen, Carl 

Hanson, Jim Petei 

Harris. F. Ptvoch, John 
Hilland. i Ben, > lie 

id, John I'i tterson, H.-2266 

Huber, Chas. L. P lohn 

Hindi. W. sen, John 

Hammond. Allen A. H. 

Huoslin, Remington Pedersen, I 

t, IT. E. i tin 

Hanson. Martin n, P. C. 

Hansen, II. P. 

Hemes, C. Quandt, A. 

ii, John 

. W. I ». 
Ingv'aldsen, Arthur B A. 

E. IT. 
on. Per Kmil Reyes, M. C. 

A. tnussen. T. C. 

■ is. ar Rod. T. 

i, Hans Kernel s. Frank 

i- Rossam. <;, -1553 
Andrew Ryan, Jan 
.Inhnsen, Alex 

Carl (ami 

Jones, A. IT. Rivaul, John 

n. IT. P. 
on, Adolf Simmon. Is. John 

Johansen, Johna. Stenberg. Hjalmar 
Fred. irg. Chas. 

■ dto 
Kaho, II. L. Sharman, C. S. 

Karlson, G. A. -1190 9aro, TT. 
Krause, Arthur Slifller, R. 

Kill. Andrew Sater, P. P. 

P. J. Slattery, IT. 



Samuelsen, 11. 


[Tndelstvedt, 


B. C. 


Swanson, Albert 






s.ii ins, ui. Geo. 


Wilson, R 


ii. Kills 


Wilson, A. 




Sevensen, Oscar 


W. 






m, E. 


\v. 


- 


Wilson, T. 




Sabro, R, W. 


, T. 




• '. E. M. 


Wald, P. 




Fred 


Wald, J. 




I'm 


l-os.S, 


James 


Sjoldenburg, P. 


White, B. 










Soderman, E. 


m, .1. 


V. 




Wi-iii 


A. 


ky, Tin-oil 


. Willi:. ,. 




Torjusen, < lunvald 






'lln in. Arvid 






Thai ker, C. J. 


a, S. 




Hai ris 


erg, Ax.'l 






Takkes, J. 


Zlmera, i }< 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound Uistriet. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1890 
MEN'S CLOTHING, SHOES. HATS 

and FURNISHING GOi 
108-110 Main Street, Seattle, Wash. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Alaska Fishermen's Letter List. 



A. 



Alaska Fishermen 

Letter List 
Audrey, A. Bell 
Anderson, Olaf 
Andersen, Ole 
Brumfilt. Walter 
Burg, Chas. 
Brown, George 
in. Eddy 
D. 
Carlson. E. 
Carlsen, Krnest 

: Bruce 
i tentril, Salvatore 
Halin. August 
Erikson, John 
!-"n m. Knut 
Graham, R. J. 
S, .lark 

Janssen, N. .M. 



• n. I". «'. 
Karlkrsmoli, 

• ii. Theodore A. 
Lldoroff, X. 
Muller, An 

Ii in. Ben. 
NI son. < Iscar 
Xi-ss, Pen. 
Olsen, Oscar J. 
n. Victor 
Rnni. 

i, Jack 
Rath, Herman 
Smith, K. 
Skooba, Xils 

Bchaffer, Paul 

Registered Mail 
Mittemeyer, John 
Meyer, Hi 

n. Peter 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Anderson, K. F. 
Anderson, Olaf 

-1118 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Charlie 
Albers, George 
Barton. M. 
Bohm, Aug. 
Carman, P. 
Fostervold, Kasper 
Gustafson, J. 
Harris, John T. 
Molmberg, Trans. 
Johannessen, Alf. 
Johannessen, Jonas 
Jackson, John 
Jesperson, Martin 
Lepp, Alex. 
Laisel, Harry 
X'ielson, Chr. 
Nielsen, Hans 



Newlngton. Fred 
Olsson, Chas. 
Pedersen, Wilhelm 
Peterson, John 
Parker, Arthur 
Rengsderf, \V. 
Rawley, Bruce 
Rubens, Cb 
Randle, C. W. 
Saro. W. 
Smith, C. Johan 
Smith, Fred 
Smith, Kmil 
Sehant, H. 
Tonsfeldt, John 
Torjesen. Gunwald 
Vejvada, Frank 
Vetters, Oscar 
Westerberg, Carl 
Wilenlus, J. T. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS. Sl'SPENDERS. 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



UNION LABEL 
SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

NYMAN BROS. 

Bee Hive Store 

Men's Furnishings, Hickory Shirts, 

Hats, Oil Clothing. 

Home of the Union Made 

Co-operative Shoe. 

302 So. F Street, ABERDEEN, Wash. 

on the Water Front. 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Andersen. John 
Dominguez. Joseph 
Jarvinen, Osear 
Klingenberg, John 
Low, G. 
Matson, P. 
Marvis, John T. 
Nelson, Andrew B. 



Rengsdorf, W. 

Robinson, K. 

one, W. F. 
Landberg, John 
Skully, John 
Smith, John 
Carl J. 
phson, T. 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WAI.I.IN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN. WASH. 



Honolulu Letter List. 

Freitas, Danl. Olson. Carl W. 

.son. Erlck Willardsen, W. 

Kaht. Hermann Whitecross, Jas. 

:obt. Westvick, Ingolf 

Lauber, Emil Springman, W, II. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



James Kenney of Philadelphia, last 
seen in Pcnnarth, Wales, is inquired 
for by V. McMahon, 96 Plain street. 
Providence. R. I. 6-1-21 

Mrs. Hattie McCleilan, 510 James 
Street, Seattle, Washington, is desir- 
ous of locating her son, George L. 
McClellan, age 21; last heard from 
about year ago in Norfolk, Va. 
3-9-21 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 

"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 

219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ole Toreson, born in Trondhjem, 
Norway, age about 30. His cousin, 
Tryggve Hagen, would like to hear 
from him. Address, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Anders Teodor Turesson, born at 
Gothenburg, will please notify The 
Swedish Firemen's Union, Gothen 
I burg 7, Sweden. 11-24-30 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Alfredsen, Adolf Lueder, Wm. 
Andersen, J. N. Lund, Olai 

Aspe, Teodor Lindholm, Chas. 

.Alto, John. -1349 Llndroos, Oskar 
Albertsen, J. Lill. Karl 

Anderson, Chas. A. Lodersen. John 
Anderson, Charley Lehan, C. 

H. I. 11 sen, Olaf J. 

Andersson, A. G. B. Larson, C. 
Andreassen, TIans Lindahn, Alfred 
Anderson, B. A. Larson. C. S. 

Anderson, Harold M.Loven, C. 
Anderson, H. M. Li.yovski. Joe 

-1495 Lorenzen, Je m 

Andersson. Gust B Laursen, Max O. 
Anderson, Harry B. Lanritzen H. M. 
Anderson, ('has. A. Lobelos, Jose 
Anderson, H. M. Luhrs, Ludvig 
Anderson, Sam Lepp, Alex 

Lamon, Arne 
Bersin, Jacob 

Berglund, Erik McCormick H. 

Boyd, W. P. MeMnllen. Dan 

Bergesen, Bert McCard, Albert 

Broman, Karl McNash, J. 

Ball, Hans McVay, Prank 

MeRride, .George 
Cormie, William Meiaa, Peder 
Carter. John J. Martin, Charl 

Crawford, Thomas Muller Prederik 
C:i risen. Diek Mathisen, N. -1296 

Carr, R. W. Monsen, Ed 

Cameron, Robert Mize. J. H. 
Cumalet, John H. Mattson, Maurice 
Christian. Jim McCIoskey, W. 

Clementsen, Alfred 
Cristen, John Neville, Thomas 

Catherwood, HoraceNystrom, Uno 
Carr, Robert R. Nielson, S. 
Calcoff, Sam Nelsen, E. C. 

C can, Thomas Nelson, Charlie 

Checkan, W. 

Carlson, Axel G. Olsen, Stephen 

Deaver. Alvin Olsen, Henning 

Ossante, Anthony 
Dyrland, Erik O'Donnell Jas. 

Dreger, Jack Olsson, P. 

Denham, Harry Olsen, Harold 

Daunt, C. Ovist, John 

Olsen, Arne 
Bliassen, Emil Olsen, Ferdinand 

Pvenson, Alex Olsen, Heman -1340 

Evans, John Olsen, E. F. -1280 

Ericksson. Julius 
Eliasson, George Perdok. H. 
Evertsen, Olaf Petersen, W. 

Emerson. Geo. Persson, Bernhard 

Escalante, J. E. Petterson, Axel 

reterson, O. 10. 
Forsberg, Alfred -1558 

Fritze, Harry Pakkola, H. 

Fernandez, Chas. Pastorillan. M. 
Fallbom, John A. Pruzon, William 
Fugman. Arthur 

Rudowitz, Henry 
CJregersen, K. Rogers, Arthur 

Gray. A. Rhodes, Bruce 

Gunn'erud, Thor Ruygrok, Dick 

Gustafson. Johan Rostum, Hairy 
Gotz, Rudolf Runge, Robert 

Gaide, Wm. Runska, Henry 

Rokow, Steve 
Hanson, Harold Rengsdorf, W. 

Hanlon, William Romand, Gaetano 
Harvev Earl S. Rogers, Robert G. 

Hill, Chas. Richardsen, E. 

Horton, Geo. A. 
Hodman, Max Smith. Alberl 

Hickey, John Sandbach, < rge 

Hall, Robert E. Stewart, Elder 

Horner, Ambrose Sandberg, N. A, 
Haave, Norval Sorensen, Edwin 

Hogstedt, Chas. Sanders, Chas 

Hansen, Berger Sutert, Ole 

Harbst, John -2905Stenberg, Alf. 
Heino, A. Schellhouse. W. 

Hunter, Ernest Sandblom H. 

Harwardt, Evold Samuelsen. H. M. 

Shaw. G. S. 
Isaak, John S. Schierenbeck. K. 

twersen, W. Shaffer, Ray W. 

Sundquist, Walter 
Jansson, John A. Seller, Robert 
Johansen. J. -1432 Schulz, Louis 
Jones, Arne M. Schmidt, H. T. L. 

Johnson. George Seamen, Fred 

Johansen, Ed. -2240 Sandstrom, Hjalmar 
J. hi. ii. John Sunde, O. 

Jorgensen, Knud Svendsen, George E. 
Johnson, James 

Jackson, F. Thompson. M. 

Jensen. Marius Thompson, Maurice 

Johansen, Carl Thomas. Fred 

Johnson, A. Tvete, Roy L. 

Johnson, Clarence 

A. Verney, A. 

Jorgensen, J. Vizcarra, O. 

Johnson. 'Pom 

Janson, John R. Williams, Terrell 

Johansen, John E. Werner, Ch. J. 
Johnson, Oscar Wilson, John 

Johnson, C. A. Williams, Frank 

Jonessen, Fred Wright. Charlie 

Johansen. Johan Wilhelm, Eduard 
Johannsson, Albert Woide, John 
Jorgensen, Jons G. Wilhelmson. Karl 
Jonassen, Johannes Winkelman, Otto 
Jensen, Paul Wennerquist, Anton 

Jensenj Kristian Werner, Chas. 
Jacobsen, Tom Wall, George 

Johanson, J. E. 

-2873 Young, Carl 

Janson, Jack R. Young. William 

Krause, Arthur Zimera, George 

Kopatz, Oscar Zetbury, Harold 

K'nudson. Andrt „ 

Koskl, Juho PACKAGES 

Buckens, B. Haines, Harold 

Kaernbach, Hugo Stevenson, Robert 

McVay, Frank 

Line, Paul Brast, K. 



Old Reliable and Up-to-Date 

TOM WILLIAMS 

EXCLUSIVE TAILOR 
FOR MEN 

28 Sacramento Street 

Phone Douglas 48 7 4 



Seamen! Have You Got a Copy of AxtelPs 

Book, "Rights and Duties of Merchant 

Seamen"? 

It contains a digest of the maritime and statutory law which any seaman 
can understand. 

It is an education as to your rights as well as your duties. It will protect 
you wherever you are. It deals fully with the subject of wages, breach of 
contract of hiring, salvage, personal injury, maintenance, consul's duties 
and powers, authority of the master and officers and duty of the seamen 
to the ship and master; digest of your rights under the Constitution of 
the United States. Enclose a dollar in an envelope and we will mail you 
a copy. Reduced rates in quantities. 

RIGHTS & DUTIES PUBLISHING CO. 

9 State St. Iver Olbers, A. B., Sales Manager New York City 



V/ori-l's 'V/arlkors 




For Twenty Tears we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 
Peaceful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
Hisputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLUS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE, General S<*retary-Trea»iiref 



UNIOWTCTAK 

fidory 



Haierup, Axel J. 
i in rwardt, Bwald 
l lavis, < irville 
MeCormick, Harold 

I lonniini. Christ 
< 'unpin 11, J. R. 

i ilsen, Herman 

Cnst ley, F. L. 
Juli.'i nson. N. A. 
< ifferdal, Ing 
Nelsen, Steve -1449 
Larson, Carl 
Hanson, O. -2171 
Baxter, T. A., -2351 
Olsson, Nels., -1710 
Keller, Robert -1648 
Vasilopolis, S. -476 
Rod, Sakarias -1172 
Johansen, J. V. -282 
Jai i ilison, Jacob -193 



Pedersen, Lars -1111 
Albertsen, Harry 

-2436 
Benbow, Chas, L. 

-3111 
Schmidt, n. <:. -3619 
Kai lane, J. -1628 
Smith, Edw. G. 

-3939 
Shurm, C. TO. -3884 
1'i.u ell, P. -1008 
Gudmundsen, J. -562 
Williams, A. -1707 
Rich, B. II. E. G. 

-1570 
Moller, L. T. A. 

-1894 
Ecklin, Carl -121" 
SGelbke, H. -584 
SHeggum, A. -3453 



"Cold Spring vs. Lycoming," "Be- 
noni vs. West Hargrave," "West 
Harcouver vs. Ozaukee." S. B. Ax- 
tell, 9 State St., New York City. 



Frank Hines, John Ryan and 
Harold Wood, who claim to have 
been forced off the SS. "West Que- 
chee" in France, December 14, 1919, 
please report or communicate with 
me at once. S. B. Axtell, Nine State 
street, New York. 4-20-21 



INFORMATION WANTED 



I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crews of the follow- 
ing vessels. In most cases, action 
has been commenced. In some cases 
the funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney with 
me. "Anacortes vs. Barge 95," 
"Alabama vs. Brandywine," "Bell 
Haven vs. Riverside Bridge," "Bak- 
ersfield vs. Eastern Sailor," "Beau- 
mont vs. Baladan," "Chester Valley 
vs. Campbello," "Cacique vs. Carta- 
gena," "Dachet vs. Hutchinson," 
"Delavan vs. Pennsylvanian," "Delana 
vs. Nevasco," "Devolente vs. Winova 
County," "Elkton vs. Cold Spring," 
"Eastern Glen vs. Andrew Jackson," 
"Silverado vs. Lake Faristan," "East 
Indian vs. Lake Flag," "Eastern 
Shore vs. Boston Bridge," "Eastside 
vs. Volunteer," "Eastern Sun vs. 
Jekyle," "Federal vs. Monamac," 
"Gypson Prince vs. Queen Makon- 
ing," "Glenwhite vs. Wathena," "H. 
F. Morse vs. Capulan," "Hadnot vs. 
Allentown," "Hickman vs. Faraby," 
"Intan vs. Putnam," "Ida vs. West 
Hepburn," "Lake Strabo vs. Lake 
I Franconia," "Louisiana vs. Tallac," 
"Lake Freezeout vs. Liberty," 
"Mesholee vs. Johnson City," 
"Moosehausic vs. Jene L. Summer- 
ville," "Monasses vs. Eastern Queen," 
"New Briton vs. Braebrum, "Orcus 
vs. Johnson City," "Pawlet vs. Yana," 
"Pratt vs. Irish," "Shannock vs. 
Devo," "Sacanac vs. War Hagara," 
"Sutransco vs. Swedco," "Tollard vs. 
Gunston Hall," "Quabbin vs. Far- 
nam," "Tunica vs. Neponier," "West 
Katan vs. Flavel," "West Harcouver 
vs. West Hemmetite," "Western 
Hope vs. Impico," "Western Comet 
vs. Nordica," "Western Queen vs. 
Cripple Creek," "Westford vs. Osha- 
loosa and Osakis," "West Segovia 
vs. Wampum," "Western Comet vs. 
Nesco," "Western Pride vs. West 
Silkirk," "West Maximus vs. Moose- 
hausic," "Western Front vs. Silver 
Queen," "Wonahbe vs. Consort," 



Mrs. Theresa Moran, 313 Rich- 
mond street. Providence, R. I., is 
anxious to ascertain the where- 
abouts of her brother, Dan Gillis, a 
member of the Firemen's Union, last 
heard of in Ashtabula, Ohio, about 
four years ago. Any information 
will be greatly appreciated. 4-27-21 



Carl Tossavainen, a former mem- 
ber of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, a native of Kuopio, Finland, 
age 33 years, last heard from on the 
Pacific Coast in February, 1913; 
any one knowing his whereabouts 
will please communicate with Busi- 
ness Manager, The Seamen's Journal, 
San Francisco, Cal. 12-1-20 



Mrs. John M. Eshelman, 601 Un- 
derwood Bldg., San Francisco, is 
anxious to ascertain the whereabouts 
of Friend McHarvey, a native of 
California, age 40, last heard from 
while in Alameda county this spring, 
i 1921. 2-16-21 

Emil Nagard, 2438 Folsom street, 

I San Francisco, California, is anxious 

j to ascertain the whereabouts of his 

brother, Joseph Louis Nagard, a 

i number of the Marine Firemen's 

Union of the Pacific, last heard of 

at San Francisco, January, 1919. 

8-3-21 



Fore Grandinetti, of Campias, Bra- 
zil, brother of Cesaro Grandinetti, 
who died at sea, can recover $119.21, 
his distributive share of the estate 
of said Cesaro Grandinetti, by com- 
municating with Attorney Silas B. 
Axtell, 9 State St., New York, N. Y. 

4-13-21 



Mrs. Jeremiah 'P. Murphy, 39 Geer 
Street, Glens Falls, N. Y., is anxious 
j to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
! son, Timothy J. Murphy, last heard 
! of in March, 1919, at Burkeburnett, 
j Texas. Those knowing ins wherc- 
I abouts will please communicate with 
his mother. 8-31-21 



nuiiiiiiiiiii 

An open shop fight has been in- 
stituted by shoe manufacturers of 
Vancouver, B. C. 

All electrical services in Berlin 
were tied up recently by a strike of 
the electricians. Xo street cars were 
running, the electric light service was 
suspended, and the newspapers were 
unable to appear. 

A number of British trade unions 
are dissatisfied with the Government's 
unemployment insurance and are 
dropping the scheme. Notice of 
withdrawal has been given by the 
Vehicle Workers' Union and the two 
organizations of seamen. The cost 
of administering the insurance is a 
drain on the unions, which complain 
that the Government has failed to 
carry out its part of the plan. State 
benefits are paid by the unions ad- 
ministering the scheme, the State 
refunding the money later. It is 
claimed that the Government is dila- 
tory in making these refunds and in 
some cases vast sums are owed the 
unions. In the case of the vehicle 
workers only about 10 per cent of 
the members participated and it is 
impossible to continue the scheme 
with such poor support, which has 
already resulted in great financial loss 
to the union. 

An investigation made by the In- 
dustrial Federation of Biella, Italy, 
into the textile industry, shows that 
in May last about 10,000 wage earn- 
ers in the factpries covered in the 
investigation, including women, boys, 
and non-qualified workmen, had an 
average hourly pay of 2.10 lire. In 
the first six months of 1914 the 
average hourly pay was 0.27 lira; 
that is to say, the cost of labor 
for spinning, carding, dyeing, and 
weaving increased from 65 centimes 
per meter to 5 lire. The condition 
of these workers is now critical, 
both on account of unemployment 
and because those who are occupied 
work on an average only three days 
per week. Conditions are more or 
less the same in the other districts 
of Italy. ' The workers have de- 
clared themselves ready to accept 
reductions in the hourly pay, pro- 
i ided continuity of work be guaran- 
teed them. But the manufacturers 
have not been able to accede to this 
proposal, because they can not ven- 
ture to increase production. 

A strike for higher wages in the 
German automobile building trades 
in February and March, 1921, re- 
sulted in pay increases for both un- 
skilled and skilled workmen. The 
following wage schedule, furnished 
by the Schebera Aktien Gesellschaft, 
motor car body builders of Berlin- 
Tempelhof, presents, for practical 
purposes, the approximate current 

:s being paid in the automobile 

building trades. Unskilled labor be 
fore the strike received 5 marks per 
hour, and now (July, 1921) it re- 
6.40 marks per hour. The 
apprentice class of labor received 
before the slrike 6 marks, and now 
6.80 marks per hour. The skilled 
workman before the war, 30 pfennigs 
, ,r hour; before the strike, 7 marks 
per hour, and now, 7.80 marks per 
hour, with the provision that in 

i. ! he may earn up to 10 

marks per hour but no more. The 
Inst class workman, "Vorarbeiter," 
is between 8 and 9 marks an 
hour, while the foreman, or so- 
, alb,! "Muster," gets hut 8 marks 
an hour. The working day is eight 
hours 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 









- 





Member of the Federal Reserve System 
And Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 



INFORMATION WANTED 



I (pen shop in the carpenter I 
was started ' < at Chi 

when contractors hired men in 
cities to work in Chicago for 
$1 per hour scale rejected by the 
union men. 

The Swedish steamer "Upland" 
arrived at New York last week 
from Gothenburg and Newcastle, 
with gold valued at $1,000,000, con- 
signed to the National City Bank of 
Xew York. 

The Department of Labor claims 
that Chinese have been smu 
across the Canadian border into 
United States to such an extent that 
there are now fifty thousand Chil 
illegally domiciled in this country. 

Eight hundred and five thousand, 
two hundred and twenty-eight im- 
migrants arrived in the United 
States during the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1921, as compared with 
430,000 for the previous fiscal year. 
Steamship companies that have 
bought vessels from the Shipping 
Board have been notified that they 
will be permitted to insure the Gov- 
ernment equity in the vessels at $60 
per ton for lakers, $80 per ton for 
other steel sir 100 a ton for 

tankers. 

The Commit! -eight at 

New York announced it is organ- 
izing a new political party to i 
the 1922 Congressional campaign. 
•Solution of the railroad problem, 
reduction of national expenditures 
and relief from taxation, by pi 
ing new and legitimate sources of 
revenue, were stated to be its chief 
aim. 

According to the Department of 
I abor, more than one hundred Rus- 
sian anarchists are at liberty in this 
country under bonds which are 
covered by $600,000 in Liberty B 
deposited with the Secretary of 
Labor. On account of the r< 
of the Russian soviet governmi • 
accept them, it has been : 
to deport them. 

It has been reported that the police 
0, Calif., have made a 
practice of using bluejacket 
"stool-pigeons" in campaigi 
crime in that city. Recently Secre 
tary Denby declared that the Navy 
1 department has neither authorized 
nor sanctioned such practices by civil 
authorities, and an investigation of 
the affair has been ordered. 

The fifteenth destroyer division of 
the Pacific fleet achieved an unusual 
honor when the destroyer Wickes 
won the battK- efficiency pennant and 
the destroyer Zeilin the gunnery 
trophy for 1921 in competition with 
the 256 destroyers of the Pacific, At- 
lantic and Asiatic fleets. Both the 
Wickes and tin- Zeilin are att 
to the fifteenth division. 

Condemnation proceedings against 
the Munson Line steamer Tuscan, on 
which United States authorities 
charge they found US quarts of 
liquor, were filed in the Federal 
Court, and when the steamer came 
into port at Mobile. Ala.. from 
China she was seized and placed in 
custody of the L T nited States Mar- 
shal. 

there were 
3149 illiterate 

or over in the State of Wyoming 
in 1920, illiterate as used meaning 
unable to read or write in any lan- 
guage. Only 320 were native whites 
or native pan the remainder 

being of foreign or mixed parentage 
or of foreign birth. The percentage 
of illiteracy decreased from 3.3 in 
1910 to 2.1 in 1920. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets $71,383,431.14 

Deposits 67,792,431.14 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,591,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 357,157.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Msrr. A. H. It. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSB, Vice-President 

A. H. MI'LLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SOIAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch 

W. C. HEYER, Manager Park- Presidio District Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT E A. CHRISTENSON 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

L. S. SHERMAN WALTER A. HAAS 

GOODFELLOW, wnaf.T.S, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorney* 



San Francisco Letter List 

Memoers whose mall is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver. Business Manger. The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clnv Street. San 
Francisco. Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and .vill be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 



rd, Anfinn 

r, Austin 

Abrahamsson, P. 

1,1 v 

Sam 
in. John 
; . Walter 
Andersen, Adolf 
Andersen, Albert 
Andersen, H.-1526 
Anderson, E-2459 
Anderson, Sivert 
Anderssen, W. 
Andersson, Chas. 

-Mil 
Andersson, C. J 

Anderson. Ingard 

Andwerck, August i , A. B 

A 1114 nst in, Herman Iverson, Iver 

Edward 
Austin, Tom 



Hanson. O. -2099 
. George S. 
orne, G. 
Heldal, T. 
Hendricksen, J. R. 
Hetland Halvnr 
1 [ilden, iteinhold 
llil.laina, S. P. 
Horton, Geo. A. 
I lobby, Wm. 
Holmberg, Mauno 
I tuber, ("lias. L. 
Hunter, Ernest 
Hurlong, Thos. 
Hubertz, Emil 



Ingebrethsen, A. 
Ingebretsen, I. 



Randerob, L. 
ii. J. 
nas. 
Bengtsson, Leander 

Isen, B. J. 
Ben way, Chas. P. 
Bjorseth, Konrad 
Paul 
n, Gunnar 
Wm. 
Born, Carl 

ii. Martin 
Brink, Harold 
Buckler, R. E. 
Bywater, Chas. E. 

Carlson. Chas. F. 
Carlson, Julius 
Carlson, S. A. 
u. Conrad 
en, Arnt 
Carlson, E. R. 



Jacobsen, Alfred 
Jansson, K. Hj. 
son, J. E. 
A. L.-2806 
Jepptsen, John 
Jewell, ai. M. 

on, Jonas R. 
Johansson, Rudolf 
Johansson, W. 

-1334 
Johnsen, Norman 
Johnson, Carl W. 
Johnson, Axel 
Johnsson, C. J. 

-1566 
.Tonson. H. Erick 
Jones, M. 
Jorgensen, Emil 
Juniper. Foster P. 
Jurikson, Julius 

Kaktin, Ed 
Karlsson, A. J. 
Kaslk, August 



on, Carl -1601 Kamm, John 



Carlsson, Gustav 
-776 

ii. G. V. 
., Mariano 
I'hristensen, H. C. 
Chrlstensen, H. P. 
. n, Elnar 
Christinson, WilliamLarsen, Martin 



Karlson. William 
Kellog, Chas. M. 
Klemetsen, Erling 
Kliemann. Otto 
Kristoffersen, H. O. 
Krause, Arthur 



. Magni A 
Conolly, Frank 

: y, Allen 
Corlch. Fred A. 
Creth, Dave 
Czarnetsky, F. 

Ubert 

i. P. 
on, H. E. 
■iig, K. J. 
l lelin, Die 
l ilttmann, Rud. 
r, Jack O. 
:. Trygve 
Dumber, E. 

Eisenhardt, Carl 
Einardt, John 

n. Thorleif 
t. A. W. 
Ellis, Frank L. 

I, D. 
Erlckson, Alfred 
1 1 ill, G. B. 

list, Charlie 
an, L. 
vg, Hugo 
an. Andrew 
Bills B. 
! le-nning 
Ford, D. 

B. H. 
Ford, Dough 
Foster. C. 
Fosse. Harald 
Friz, Ottmar 
Fuller, Everett 

. Johan 
Gabrielsen, Lasr 



Lasdin, 11. 
Laine, Gustaf 
Larsen, Finvald 
Larsen, Kaare T. 

oe, Julian 
Leskinen, John 
LeiS «ny 

Liesen, Wm. 
Ldlja, Birger 

u, E. 
Lindroos, Fred 
Little, M R. 
I.oberg, Bror 

•ise, Roy 
Lund, Wm. J. 
Lutten, Theodor 

Luoma, Waino 
Lyman, T. 

Mil honey, F. J. 
Alagnusson, Carl 
Malson, a. g. 

-Mackenzie. Ed. 
Macdonald, Donald 
MaiKenzie, Alex 
Maid, Wm. 
McDermott, T. B. 
UcCormick, H. W. 
McFarlan, Carl F. 
Mel .can, Augus 
McLean, Donald 
Meyer, llenry-3352 
Melin, M. M. 
Mesa, J. 

o. M. N. 
Meolloy, Chas. P. 
E. .Mil 1,1. Olaf 

■ i ■ 1 1 v, T. F. 
kelsen, Olaf M. 
Morris, Osear R. 



NIlSBon, Gustav Schussler, C. M. 

.. A '"'''<• Simmering, C. L. 

Nlcolaisen, Ancker Shapiro, Joseph 

Nixon. L. A. Stevens. Thos. 

Nordlund, Edward stiniev. Chas. 

M-om. H. Stjamstrand, Bror 

-here. Alfred Sunsberg, K. K. 

Nunstedt, Paul Swensson, E.-3566 

n„™„ ir ™ Sidoroff, N. 

n. V E. Sidorof. B. 

n. Johannes Sorensen. N. M. 
-i*o« -'447 

Ojavsen. Otto a Speller. Henry 

•"""•-•. »• Spetteland, B. 

-}■ H. stall, Ralph M. 

Olson, Harry-885 Sternberg. HI. N. 
Olsen. Ole J. -1020Stewart. .1. 1 1. 

'•■ Albin Stone. M. C. 
tiowsky, Leo 

'. Enrique Tanum, Uelge 

Osses, Andrew 1 ■ nnenhaus. Harry 

1 'stlund, .John Terry .1 B 

Ottem. Aksel Thorwick, H. s. 
1 'w. i,s. Leo 

Poi— a . imson, Geo. H. 

I aim, Axel Thome. A. \V. 

. ankratz, B. Thorsen. Carl 

1 aterson, Kenneth Toffor A 

"■ A*el J. Tomlln, Edward 

ien, Hans Tourtellot. W. L. 

1 eder Tosn j am es M. 

■' ,' s t ; ?'■ . Troughton, Wm. 

Pett. Richard Tvede, Nick 

Pettersen, K. S. Tyson W 
son, Frank G. 

eraon, C. V. Vagner, John 

I edersen Bysten Vanquest, Ernst 

'I'li'ik, C. VdKooy, s. f. f. 

Piiiistrom, R. J. Veckenstedt, Wm. 

itah, Tony Verl 

ukinton. Homer Vincenzo. Hoht. 

JK? Nicolai Vogellus ' E J' er 

t;-,«vi„ n i Walters, Herbert 

K.inkm, Orrin Walker A 

Rasmussen. Aksel Watson', A.' 

Walter A. Walenlus. Peter 

Redinker, Mlke hde, Fritz 

Reidel, Gustav Weds Bruno 

I eiersen, Johan A. Wendel, Emil 

Re -sKord. Hillm. welteverde, John 

Robertson, Jorgen Werd. a. de 

Rodowiteh, Harry Wergeland, Fred 

Rogenfeldt, John Weister Willi 

aberg, Louis Whailey, A. J. 

Roth, C. M. WUkander, Eric 

Huiid.slrom. Albert Wilhelm. Erick 

Scbaeffer, George w llliams, R. H. 

_ Y- „ Wood, Richard 

■on, Paul Worman. Albert 

''. 1'aul Wolter, John 

Schroeder, C. F. Woodley, C. R 
Schultz, George 

Schoenfeldt, C. Ziehr. Ernst 



Anyone knowing the whereabi 
forsten Hanson, kindly commu- 
nicate with Capt. Gust. Johnson, 
i nter St., San Pedro, Cal. 
Ili> last address was Hotel Oliver, 
722 Harrison St.. S. F, About nine 
years ago lie was employed by Mat- 
sun Navigation Co., S. F. His father, 
< Mto Hanson, of Gothensburg, Swe- 
den, wishes to hear from him. 

9-21-21 



Anyone knowing tlie whereabouts 
of Charles Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, last heard of in 1916, 
address P. O. Box 673, Juneau, 
Alaska. His father, Peter Iverson, 
is anxious to hear from him. Kindly 
communicate with A. Johnsen, P. O. 
Box 65, Seattle, Wash. 7-20-21 



Mrs. Margareth Watson is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
husband, John Watson, who left 
Seattle on board the S. S. "Jadden,'' 
and was then heard from in June, 
1920, on board the S. S. "Quaker 
City," at Philadelphia. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts, kindly 
communicate with his wife at 34211 
Thirty-ninth avenue S. W., Seattle, 
Wash. 6-22-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Joseph Bert Riese. a native of 
Cleveland, Ohio, last heard of De- 
cember 1, 1919, in Savannah, Ga., 
when he shipped on the SS. "West 
Apaim," please communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Joseph Riese, 4120 
Bailey avenue, Cleveland, O. 

6-29-21 



Brother of Carl Wohmar Holm, 
a native of Isle of Nargem, Es- 
thonia, born 1888, last heard of at 
Newport, Monmouthshire, England, 
on an American ship in 1916. Kindly 
communicate with Erik Kristian 
Holm, care National Sailors' and 
Firemen's Union, 9 Dubois street, 
Antwerp, Belgium. 7-27-21 



PACKAGES. 

Br, G. R. Keith. J. 
Chri.stensen, Richard Klemmetsen, Sigurd 

Clark. Fred W. Range, Walter 

iter, Harold Ljungqvist, HJ. 

Dommelen. G. Larsen. J. -jui2 

Elliott, Arthur W. Maloney, J. J. 

Enherg, E. Murphy, T. 

Fischer. Chas. O. O'Connor. John J. 

Fagerberg, T. Olsson, Carl J. 

I, H. Stein. N. 

Hallenberg, G. Sidoroff, N. 

ii. Hans Taylor, James B. 

Hood, Alex. Wagner, R. H. 
in lanessen, A. -2277 



J. Latvala is anxious to ascertain 
the whereabouts of Arne Wartiainen, 
a native of Finland. Anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts, kindly commu- 
nicate with the above named at 
Box 306, R. F. D. 2, Kirkland, Wash. 

4-20-21 



Phone Kearny 6361 Union Tailors 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 
50 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



p^^.d.379 Your Old Friend 




JOE WEISS 

WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

92 FOURTH ST. nr. MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Union-Made Shoes for Men Exclusively 

Repairing Done While You Walt 
We use only the best leather that the market affords 



hi. Claude D. Moseley, T. E. 



Groth, Fred 

Wm. 
n, Aksel M. 
i. Antonius 
n, Jorgen 
Hansson, Martin 
I lay, C. W. 
Haugen, C. H. 



Monsen. Chas. 
Murphy, Eddie 

i. Henry X)e> 
Nelson, John G -1366 
Nielsen, Alf. V. K. 

ii. Axel-1176 
I i. R. 
Nilsen, Nils M. 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 

268 MARKET STREET 

Coiducted by Capt. Chas. Ehler» 

Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



PENNRICH'S NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Mates' Courses, $55; by mail, $80. 

License guaranteed or fee refunded. 

Write for Full Particulars 

For Sale — ■ Sextants and Marine 

Glasses. 

CAPTAIN W. PENNRICH, 

36 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Near Borough Hall, Sub. Station. 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 

Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



GEO. A. PRICE 



SAYS 



'BUSINESS IS GOOD. YOUR MONEY'S 

WORTH AND YOU KNOW IT. 

THERE IS A REASON." 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, N«ar Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Thos. A. Jones, 720 N. Lancaster 
avenue, Dallas, Texas, is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of his son, 
Thos. Lenard Jones, a member of 
the Marine Firemen's Union of the 
Atlantic. 3-9-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Olaf Erling Hendriksen, a native 
of Norway, age 33, last heard from 
on the Atlantic Coast, kindly com- 
municate with his brother, Albert 
Hendriksen, Aalo Post Office, Chris- 
tiansand, Norway. 6-1-21 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5.00 

UNIFORMS and SUITS, TO ORDER and READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 



36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 




You obtain full value for your shoe money when 
you buv 

W. L. DOUGLAS 

(Union Made) 

SHOES FOR MEN 

Y"u know that the price is right. The price is 
ftxi '1 at the factory and stamped on the sole 
of the shoe. Also agents for 

STRONG & GARFIELD. JUST WRIGHT, 

WALK EASE 

Priced from 

$5.00 to $13.00 

58 THIRD STREET, S. F. 

Between Market and Mission 



PRICES 



AT THE DENVER CONVENTION 

the American Federation of Labor took official 
notice that 

— huge losses were suffered by workers last year 
through purchases of fraudulent and worthless 
securities. 

Convention Resolved 

— to call upon the United States Government "to rid 
the country of fraudulent schemers" 

— to assist the Government to bring to the attention 
of the union members the advantages of buying 
Treasury Savings Securities, issued in denomina- 
tions of 25c, $1, $5, $25, $100,' $1000 

Buy Them Through Your Post Office or Bank 
Government Loan Organization 

Second Federal Reserve District 
120 Broadway, New York 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietor* 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SM O K" F R ^i See t* 13 * this label ( in light blue ) a PP« ars on the 
1V1VIVLIVJ box ^ w hich you are served. 

Issued by Authority of the Cigar Makers' International Union of America. 

,-js^ Union-made Cigars. 

K«"«j\ l2flig (Jnllflrt. lhttO»Cl V r»c«.uin.(fln(h.tt)O.M«»r»ria«by.ll'aUaB 

■*" \t\ jutHBtitor iHtfciGttNwr.n'iitunNAiioiuiUHioiioi amiki jnoruru»iM;evot«<jt«tiit»o- 
1P-1 •.onauMiiiftiitMOitAiyAiuiiAUnifiidUiinaALWUiARi.ofTHtOU/i llBiwaresaisraMisS 

dLrySB U»m Ci^uto til vnofc*rc thfotnhouT nit worttf. 

V C M I U tf Ammtti 



m News from Abroad i 



The "Teutonic," the big White 
Star liner, which for upward of 
thirty years was engaged on Atlantic 
passenger service, has been sold to 
a Dutch firm and is being taken to 
Rotterdam to be broken up. 

A disastrous explosion occurred 
last week at Oppan, Germany. The 
Badische Company's great chemical 
plant was destroyed with an esti- 
mated loss of 1500 lives. Nearly 
three thousand persons were injured. 

Announcement that hostilities be- 
tween Jugo-Slavia and Albania have 
broken out has startled the League 
of Nations Assembly. Lord Robert 
Cecil, representing the Union of 
South Africa, and Dr. Fridtjof Nan- 
sen of Norway are anxious that the 
assembly should take some action. 

Rome reports the balance of trade 
still running against Italy. In the 
first five months of 1921 the im- 
ports were approximately $317,000,- 
000, while the exports amounted to 
but $134,000,000. This leaves an ad- 
trade balance of $183,000,000. 
In the corresponding period last year 
the adverse balance was $160,000,000. 

With the withdrawal from Fiume 
of the legionaires of Gabriele d'An- 
nunzio, the Italian soldier-poet, the 
military .command was assumed by 
General Amandtea. The Italian lega- 
tion has been closed and all powers 
have been taken over by the special 
Italian commissioner, Commandant 
Castelli. 

The entire French nation, as well 
as all foreigners residing in France, 
will be re-catalogued and compelled 
to register their thumbprints, ac- 
cording to the latest regulation of 
Police Chief Leuillier. Identification 
of crime suspects and the detection 
of criminals is expected to be made 
easier under the new system. 

The Standard Oil Company has 
acquired possession of the oil re- 
fineries at San Sabba, near Trieste. 
Prior to the war these refineries 
were operated with Galician and 
Baku oils. They had a capacity of 
fifteen thousand tons of illuminating 
petroleum, twelve thousand tons of 
lubricants nad paraffin and three 
thousand tons of benzine. 

The British Indian Government lias 
instituted proceedings against the 
Brothers Mohammed AH and Shau- 
kat Ali on charges of _ attempting to 
cause disaffection among the troops, 
and sedition. The Ali brothers, who 
are associated with the movement of 
Mahatma Gandhi, leader of the non- 
residents, are charged with taking- 
part in recent demonstrations in the 
Malabar area. They are under arrest. 

Australians are for the settling of 
1,000,000 English tillers of the soil 
upon 1,000,000 farms in Australia, 
through creation of a fund of $150,- 
000,000 to be raised in equal propor- 
tion by Australia and Great Britain. 
The scheme would permit emigration 
to Australia of a large number of 
the unemployed service men of the 
kingdom to some of the richest land 
in the world, which as yet has never 
felt a plowshare. 

The world's Zionist Congress, be- 
fore closing its sessions at Carlsbad 
1 lio-Slovakia) adopted a resolu- 
tion calling for an "open door" in 
Palestine, Another resolution adopted 
requested early confirmation by the 
League of Nations of Great Britain's 
mandate over Palestine. The Jewish 
National Assembly in Palestine and 
its executive body were recognized 
by the congress as the official insti- 
tutions representing Palestine Jewry. 



16 



T 1 1 E S K A MEN'S JOURNAL 






With the Wits 






Xoali (as Ark lurches heavily) — 
Confound that elephant; he's turned 
over in his sleep again. 



"(iirls arc very particular whom 
they dance with, but they will marry 
almost anybody." 



"What was the cause of that scar 
you have on your head?" 

"A woman told me that her hus- 
band was in St. Louis." 



If the purpose is to annihilate tax- 
payers, the merchant ship is about 
as deadly as the battleship. -Illinois 
State Register. 



Mabel — 1 low did it feel when Jack 

kissed you in the tunnel- 
Helen— I felt as if 1 never wanted 

to see him again." 



Mistress Hilda, you mustn't clean 
the plates with your handkerchief. ■ 

Slavey— Oh. that bane alright; it 
bane only dirty one. 

"Was she annoyed when she saw 
you with a four days' beard on your 

face?" 

"Well, -he said she felt it very 
much." 



Mother— Xo. Willie, for the third 
time, you can't have another penny. 

Willie (in despair)—! don't see 
where dad pets the idea that you're 
always changing your mind. 



"I'm sorry to have to do this," 
said little Johnny, as he spread the 
jam on the baby's face, "but I can't 
have suspicion pointing its finger at 
me." — Everybody's M agazine. 



Those keen Eastern business men 
bam something every daw A candy 
store operator who has been making 
a 300 per cent profit says be can cut 
prices in half ami -till make a profit! 
— Seattle Times. 

Sammy couldn't understand the ' 
theory of evolution, so he questioned 
his mother. 

"Mamma, am I descended from a 
monkey?" 

"I don't know, my boy." she re 
plied, "I never knew any of your 
father's people.". 



"Hid you really call this gentleman 
an old fool last night?" asked the 

The prisoner tried hard to collect 
his thoughts. 

"Well, the more I look at him, the 
more likely it seems that I did." he 
replied. — Lawyer and Bank. 



you like 
Of course 



A promising youth sought infor- 
mation from his father regarding 
family affairs. 

"1 lad," said he, "do 
mother?" 

"Why, what a question! 
I do!" 

"And she likes you?" 

"I am certain she does." 

"I )id she ever say so?" 

"Thousands of times, my son." 

"Did she marry you because she 
loved you?" 

Thereupon dad became angry and 
said: "See here, young man, you're 
getting too personal. But I don't 
mind telling you that she did." 

The boy added, after a pause: 
"Tell me this, dad: Was mother as 
near-sighted then as she is now?" 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
ot CAPTAIN IIKNKY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. ■ Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Caw, and is now. in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 

500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Hezzanlth's, Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's Compasses, 
Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sounding Machines, Sextants, 
Parallel Rulers, Pelorus, Dividers, Nautical Books, Charts 
and Tide Tables. Fully equipped department for the 
repair and adjustment of chronometers, watches and 
clocks. This work is in charge of an expert of American 
and European experience. All work guaranteed. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds in Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Diamond* 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



Seamen! Watch for Developments 

See Our Weekly Reports Posted in All Union Halls. 

1 have said that I would never be attorney for shipowners, until the 
seamen were shipowners. One of the purposes of my visit to Europe this 
summer is to acquire knowledge as to shipping conditions abroad and 
particularly to ascertain with what degree of success the seamen of 
Italy are ooerating ships. 

Any seamen, who, with a view to becoming shipowners some time, are 
willing to form "a Seamen's Society for Savings" and will pledge to save 
one-fourth of their wages over their board and lodging per annum, said 
savings to be put in a depository that they themselves may select, please 
:ommunicate with the undersigned. 

Silas B. Axtell, 9 State St., New York City 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Established 1874 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want your Panama blocked 

ii do that 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

762 VALENCIA ST., San Francisco 
Phone Park 9401 




games Ji. Sorensea 
sftBLflMJrMM 



SILVERWARE « CLOCKS 

for wedding presents. Large stock to select from. 

cfcwmmta 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

715 Market St., between Third and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco 

All Watch and Jewelry Repairing Guaranteed 

Gifts that last by the thousand 



CJBfrBusr'Eii 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ARGONAUT SHIRR 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



VOL. XXXV, No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1921. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 
Whi 



W« 



Harvestings tin onus Uncover Systemm of Hir&dl^uisfarii&l !Esp5©ini8ig|© 



The following excerpts are of more than 
ordinary interest to every worker in this coun- 
try. They reveal to the public, at this time, 
facts which have been of common knowledge 
to all informed and progressive labor men for 
some time past. Perhaps labor should feel 
grateful that certain of the most respectable 
elements of society have deigned to give these 
matters some measure of consideration. 

The salient features of the exposures are to 
the effect that the duties of the "Under-Cover 
Men" "were to break the morale of the 
strikers." 

Even the respectability which the Inter- 
Church prestige should have lent to the under- 
taking did not give their investigators immunity 
from classification as "members of the I. W. 
W." and "Reds." 

The noticeable suggestion that where radicals 
control the unions it is easier for the "Under- 
Cover Men" to operate is in line with the 
holding up of West Virginia as a place where 
the rights of labor are respected. Editor. 



The Commission of Inquiry, which made the 
Report on the Steel Strike for the Interchurch 
World Movement, announces the publication 
of supplementary reports (recently released to 
the press). The main report and findings, 
adopted by the Interchurch Movement and 
published last summer, provided that the spe- 
cial studies made by the Commission's investi- 
gators during the strike, should be published 
later. These reports are now being brought 
out (by Harcourt, P.race & Co.) in book form 
under the title, "Public Opinion and the Steel 
Strike." 

The new reports deal with the use of "under- 
cover men" or spies in the strike, and the uses 
of spy material after the strike; the abuses of 
civil rights in Western Pennsylvania; the rela- 
tion of press and pulpit to the strike as studied 
in Pittsburgh; public opinion in immigrant com- 
munities; the will are work of the Steel Cor- 
poration. 

In announcing the supplementary reports, the 
officers of the Commission said: "Making pub- 
lie these reports represents the fulfilment of 
the duty put upon the Commission of Inquiry 
by the Interchurch Movement. We have sim- 
ply tried not to shirk our original responsi- 
bilities. The reports indicate what a mass of 
facts the Commission had before it in making 
its own report, and exemplify the types of in- 
vestigation by the trained staff which worked 
under the supervision of the Bureau of Industrial 
Research. P.esides the reports of investigators, 
accepted and edited by the Commission, there 
will be made public certain records of the Com- 
mission's activities, since the investigation as 



well as during the strike. The Commission's 
work is just as pertinent now as it was a year 
ago. There has been no fundamental change 
in the conditions reported on. There are prob- 
lems in the steel industry, notably the twelve- 
hour day, and the denial of collective action 
among the workmen, which will not down." 

Communication from workers in steel mills 
have been received by the Commission, de- 
scribing present conditions. In most cases the 
writers ask that their names be kept secret 
because they would be discharged if it were 
known that they had written to the Com- 
mission. 

The most recent letters show that in some 
mills during the depression of the past summer, 
when there was often but a few days' work in 
a week, the twenty-four-hour turn and the 
seven-day work-week have been abolished, and 
many twelve-hour men were working only ten 
hours. One letter reads: 

"In regard to eight hours, the foreman 
said today he didn't think we would ^et it, 
as when we got busy we would be back on 
twelve hours. 

"I am enclosing newspaper clipping in 
which it states that the reason the twelve- 
hour day is still on the company payroll 
is because the men would rather work 
twelve hours, and that the work was nol 
continuous labor. As far as the men not 
wanting eight hours, I have this to say: 
They never come around to ask the men 
anything about the hours or wages cither. 
You can see by the clipping that Mr. Gary 
formed a committee of presidents of the 
various companies to work out our salva- 
tion, but they never came around to our 
plant to see how many men wanted eight 
or twelve hours. Last Sunday, in Home- 
Stead, I talked with a friend, who is a 
heater in that plant, who said they never 
came around there to see how many hours 
the men wanted to work. 

"As regards intermittent labor, you have 
to be there the whole time and work the 
full time, unless there is a breakdown, and 
then you have to lie around inside the plant 
until the repairs are made. If you are 
down four hours you lose that four hours' 
pay, bu1 you have to stay in the plant those 
four hours. We have to take what they 
want whether it is in reason or not. 1 
trust you will keep my name confidential 
on account of my job, as they do not 
want men to tell tales out of school." 



A membei ol tb ' \. W. 

'I .iylor, returned rece 

portant church conferences ii 
said : 

" ' he St , i W ii 

in Englai -I. in-! 
leaders there i 

in tin- ' ind h 

al eight houi day in I 
plants, and said that the 
steel chiiil. .\ ers tin 

orkmen's null' to 
who did not deal w it 

"No such church reporl 
in E ugland, althoug 
for Ii ading churchmen, 
bishops, to be meml 
Labor parti I 
pressed was ; ! 



mat in - 
e thi i 









"The most important 
officers of the i i 

out the i allej pro. ,,,, 

which thi 

dations, nameh , 1 i 

vestigate the so called lal 
with a view to theii 
Records of the I 
C S. Steel ( orpo 

The supplemental 

merely Supportill 

port, bin are full 

the Commission's m 

given out Octoh 

by Robei i l iii. ii 

In I). .1. Saposs; the j Public 

' (piiiion," and tl 

Commi ion' i 

tors were ■ 

Miss Marian D. 
trial Research eu| 
i i ions. 

Hundreds 

111 the reporl lei e,i tin 

slid strike, and 

clustrial espionage." Il fii 

dred daily reports mm 

or spies in the ti 

the strike. Tl ■ 

Commi || H . 

I iboi detecti the 

wjdi 

The 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



"No. 203," etc., mixed with the strikers or held 
johs inside the plant, dressed as workers. 

The Corporation's auxiliary company pro- 
fessed to have five hundred such "operatives" 
at work in the steel strike, and the concern's 
Pittsburgh manager told the investigator that 
many of these were inside the unions, fre- 
quently as officers, The under-cover men were 
mostly "foreigners" like the workmen they mix 
with. Their reports were very generally sent 
to the detective agency's headquarters to be 
"edited" or rewritten, then mailed to the em- 
ploying steel company. Their duties were to 
"break the morale of the strikers." 

Extracts are given from scores of the under- 
cover men's reports showing how they wormed 
their way among the Monessen strikers, what 
sort of conversation they report, what sort of 
strikebreaking rumors they spread. A general 
unreliability and worthlessness characterizes 
their reports, offset by human touches such as: 

"I think prohibition has a good deal to 
do about this strike, for every time I enter 
a saloon I hear someone saying, 'To hell 
about working, if we cannot get a drink- 
once in a while. Water is no good; it only 
makes one sick. Let Mr. Carnegie drink 
water.' ... I told them that the whisky 
might come back when the strike is over." 
- Report of "Z-16.") 

One under-cover man works inside the plant 
with the few strikebreakers and tells how "the 
office clerks are shoveling coal, and they seem 
to be working fine." Others attend the strikers' 
mass meetings at the one point in this 1 
where the authorities had not forbidden meet- 
ings. A spy report blames these meetings for 
the strikers' morale, and says: 

"It is very difficult for me to understand 
why the local authorities permit these regu- 
lar meetings to be held in Charleroi. . . . 
Undoubtedly, it occurs to me that our 
clients have considerable influence with the 
local authorities. No "meetings are being 
held in Monessen territory, nor in any of 
the other nearby mill centers, and I cannot 
see why these meetings could not be sup- 
pressed in Charleroi also. It, undoubtedly, 
would be a boon for all steel interests in 
this particular section." 

The espionage, the study shows, was hardly 
concealed during the strike. The Corporation's 
auxiliary company manager told the investiga- 
tor that their aim was to work into labor 
unions: "We expect, eventually, to control the 
unions which have fallen into radical hands in 
the last few years." All this is done with the 
highest profession of good intentions. The Cor- 
poration's auxiliary manager was called twice 
from Pittsburgh to Wheeling just as the strike 
broke badly in Wheeling. He said to the in- 
vestigator: 

"\ T ow, for instance, this is how we work. 
We might do this in Wheeling, for example. 
We might have forty to fifty men there in 
different trades, working in from all angles. 
We could expect ten or fifteen of them to 
reach positions of influence in local unions, 
hive or more would become union officials. 
We might expect in that way to have men 
as international officers, or even members 
of the State Federation of Labor." 

He said that "a member of the Steel Strike 
National Committee was their man." lie made 
the flat statement: 

"Take Akron, Ohio, for example; we con- 
trol the situation there. There is no trouble 
in Akron. When the A. F. of L. organ- 
izer comes to Akron he reports to our 
man." 

The study points out that this statement was 
made in the end of 1919, and that over a year 
later ten high labor officials in Akron, Ohio, 
were exposed as on the payroll of the Cor- 
poration's auxiliary company. A former treas- 
urer and a former president of the Akron Cen- 
tral Labor L T nion and a man who was candi- 
date for the Akron City Council were among 
those exposed and expelled from the unions by 
the efforts of union members, who had become 
his. In Wheeling, in the past month, the 
unions exposed officials there who were also 
spies. 

The study also gives the detailed affidavit of 
an operative, "S-32," who worked for several 



hicago unions, stirring up strikes 
and then breaking the strikes. Many manu- 
facturing plants are named, and an attempt to 
swing a union election is detailed. 

The study relates the activities during the 
strike of another concern, Sherman Service, also 
with offices in New York, Boston, St. Louis, 
Philadelphia, Cleveland. New Haven, Provi- 
Toronto. Sherman Service's Chicago 
were raided by the authorities during 
the strike, and its advisory director was indicted 
for conspiracies and intent "to create riots, in- 
surrection and murder." Instructions to "opera- 
tises" (under-cover men) to stir up race hatreds 
between Italian and Serbian strikers are repro- 
duced in the study. The very elaborate efforts 
of Sherman Service, through full-page news- 
paper advertisements and court proceedings, to 
appear before the public as a beneficent influ- 
ence, are detailed. The Sherman Service Chi- 
cago manager, like the Corporation's auxiliary 
•manager, told the investigator that it was also 
their aim to control labor unions and to get 
their "representatives" to hold "the highest 
offices in the unions.'' 

Finally, the study traces the use made of 
industrial espionage against the Commission of 
Inquiry and the Interchurch Movement from 
November, 1919, to the summer of 1920. The 
report of an unnamed under-cover man, wdio 
pursued the Commission's investigators in Pitts- 
burg, and inspected the Interchurch offices in 
New York is given in full. It was sent to 
the offices of the U. S. Steel Corporation, being 
dated two days after the Commission's first 
interview with Mr. E. H. Gary, chairman of 
the Corporation (November 10, 1919). The 
"anonymous" report called the investigators 
"members of the I. W. W." and "reds." 

The study says "the anonymous special re- 
port became a serious episode in the inquiry 
not because any of its allegations were true, 
but because it was received as true by powerful 
nun who were not unaccustomed to a system 
of spy reporting; . . . because great laymen 
in several states and in various industries re- 
ceived and weighed spy reports much as they 
took a newspaper.' This report, called "Docu- 
ment A," was circulated by steel manufacturers, 
by employers associations, by the managing 
director of the National Industrial Conference 
Hoard, first in typed form, and finally in printed 
shape. The secretary of the Ohio Manufac- 
turers' Association, Malcolm Jennings, who cir- 
culated it, retracted, and his apology is given, 
with the results of other investigations of it by 
Interchurch officials. 

The study then describes Document B, an- 
other spy report against the Interchurch. This 
was the report mailed by Ralph M. Easley, of 
the National Civic Federation, to the offices of 
tlie U. S. Steel Corporation on March 29, 1920, 
with a letter recommending that the clergymen 
reported in it be "kicked out of their positions." 
Mr. Lasley's letter gave as his reason for send- 
ing the report on gentlemen in "the Inter- 
church World Movement, the Federal Council 
of the Churches of Christ and the Y. M. C. A." 
the fact that "at this time they arc proposing 
to raise hundreds of millions of dollars for this 
work." Mr. Easley, in a long conference with 
Interchurch officials, denied having sent the 
letter, though he later admitted it. None of 
the men spied on by his agent had anything 
to do with the Interchurch steel report. 

The study also describes Document C, an- 
other secret report circulated in the spring of 
1 ' '-'> and described by business men, who 
showed it to the Commission as "the thing 
responsible for the failure of the Interchurch 
financial drive in Pittsburgh." Its twenty-six 
typewritten pages included much of the spy 
material in Documents A and B. 

The study shows how this material was pre- 
sented to Government officials by steel manu- 
facturers. It was included in the seventy-eight- 
page brief of the National Association of Sheet 
and Tin Plate Manufacturers filed with the 
Senate Committee on Labor and Education 
against the Senate motion to make the Steel 
Report a public document. The Commission's 
reply riddled this document by showing its 
spy sources. 

The study finally asks, "Can we live without 
spies?" The Commission recommends Federal 
investigation of labor detective agencies looking 
to their regulation or abolition. 



A study of the "mind of immigrant commu- 
nities in the Pittsburgh district" analyzes the 
forces which make public opinion among the 
Slovaks, Russians, Poles, Croats, Serbs, Hun- 
garians, Italians and Lithuanians, who com- 
prise the bulk of the steel workers. Community 
leadership is shown to be that of "clansmen" 
or enterprising immigrants accustomed to profit 
from the helplessness of newer fellow-immi- 
grants. The leaders are frequently officers of 
clubs or benefit societies, editors, lawyers and 
other professional men. The leadership is es- 
sentially conservative, and has been neglectful 
of the interests of the immigrants as working- 
men. The leadership follows imitatively the 
dominant "American" leadership round about 
the immigrant communities. Generally the na- 
tionalist leaders did not support the strike, but 
did not dare oppose it. The study points out 
that the immigrants who struck were chiefly 
those who have their families here and expect 
to remain in America. Other immigrants 
wanted chiefly to pile up money to go back 
to their families in their native lands. 

The true story of the interview of the Com- 
mission with Mr. Gary for the informal presen- 
tation of a plan looking to mediation in the 
strike is given out in the shape of the Com- 
mission's records made at the time. Letters to 
and from Mr. Gary are cited. A chapter also 
details the history of the Commission's efforts 
to obtain Government action on the Steel Re- 
port's recommendations, and indicates that a 
pread popular support for the recom- 
mendations has been largely thwarted, so far 
as visible reforms in the industry are con- 
cerned. 

* * * 

A report on what happened to civil liberties 
of communities and personal rights of working- 
men during the steel strike makes up another 
of tin' supplementary reports. 

The report on civil liberties contains part of 
the basis for the main report's finding "that 
the steel strike made thousands of citizens be- 
lieve that our institutions are not democratic 
or not democratically administered; that they 
believe that local magistrates and police au- 
thorities often try to break strikes, and that 
State and Federal authorities often help." The 
conditions lead the Commission to recommend 
that the Federal Government investigate the 
state of civil liberties in Pennsylvania, and make 
public two Federal Government reports made 
two years ago. These reports still remain 
buried in Government files. 

The report on Civil Liberties in Western 
Pennsylvania, by George Soule, is based on 
three hundred affidavits, signed statements or 
statements in the presence of investigators, 
made by victims, or eye-witnesses, of viola- 
tions of civil rights during the strike. The 
statements deal with the acts of public authori- 
ties or of local police or State constabulary 
in Pittsburg, Braddock, Lutler, Clairton, Do- 
nora, Duquesne, Parrell, Homestead, Johnstown, 
McKeesport, Monessen. New Castle, New Ken- 
sington, Natrona and Woodlawn. Conditions 
are contrasted with conditions in Ohio and 
\\ est Virginia, where civil rights were not 
denied, ami no violence attended the strikers' 
exercise of their rights. 

The report finds that the denial of rights 
of speech and assembly to workingmen was a 
practice in Pennsylvania before the strike be- 
gan. Local regulations and State laws are 
such as to facilitate suppression by local au- 
thorities who, in Pennsylvania steel towns, are 
frequently steel mill officials as well. The 
denials, long before the strike, were based on 
the reasoning that meetings would lead to 
unions, unions would lead to strikes, and 
strikes to violence; therefore meetings should 
be prevented. After the strike began, other 
rights of strikers were invaded by wholesale 
raiding and arresting on flimsy charges or no 
publicly recorded charges. The peaceful course 
of the strike in Ohio, where no suppressions 
were enforced, is contrasted with Pennsylvania. 

The affidavits charge a long list of acts of 
unwarranted search and destruction in strikers 
hemes, wholesale and individual clubbings 
principally by the State constabulary, arrests 
and fines meted out when strikers told the 
Court they would not go back to work, denial 
of rights in Court, and shootings and murder. 
Conditions during the strike are described as 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



"terrorism." In most cases there was no 
means of legal redress open to strikers nor of 
investigation open to the public. 

A detailed statement is made of the only 
public meeting for the discussion of the strike, 
held in Pittsburgh during the strike, by a 
non-labor organization. This was conducted 
by Sidney Teller of the Irene Kaufmann 
Settlement despite every influence to prevent it. 



LABOR UNIVERSITY IN BELGIUM 



In two years at most the City of 
Brussels will have a labor university in 
concrete, brick and stone. The plans 
have been approved and the contracts 
awarded. The new buildings are to be 
erected on a prominent site near the 
North Station and the new seaport of 
Brussels. They will include a museum of 
tools for the different crafts, open to the 
public, shops where different trade groups 
can carry on craft experiments, and a 
public liberary entirely devoted to shop 
literature. In the shop classes themselves 
about eight thousand students of all the 
different crafts and trades answering the 
various needs of modern industry will be 
accommodated. 

Many objections had to be overcome 
before this project could be realized. One 
of these was the large expense involved, 
but the need of providing the country 
with a great trade school in the capital 
proved essential, and when it came to the 
point the money could be found. Since 
l')14 the City of Brussels has appro- 
priated for this purpose a credit of 3,500,- 
000 francs, the Province of Brabant 1,250,- 



000 francs, and the State has promised the 
large subsidy needed to realize a project 
which seemed so desirable in the national 
interest. 

The new university of labor is awaited 
with impatience by all who are interested 
in the development of Belgian industry. 
Hitherto the trade schools of the national 
capital, of which 'there were twenty-five, 
were scattered and housed in all sorts 
of buildings, sometimes in cellars, with 
hardly any relation to their particular 
requirements. Yet each of them occupied 
valuable ground, so that the new institu- 
tion will actually represent a saving by 
centralizing all these schools and giving 
them jointly the equipment necessary for 
demonstration and class work. The uni- 
versity will have a central administration, 
but the individual life of each separate 
school, with its director, its board of 
administration, its faculty, its separate 
affiliations and its own equipment, will be 
autonomous from the technical, artistic 
and scientific points of view. This au- 
tonomy — upon which much stress is laid 
by the organizers of the new university 
— insures a willing collaboration among 
the different schools for their common 
ends. Thus, for instance, it is planned 
so to co-ordinate the studies and work 
of the different schools that deal with the 
same material or subject, such as stone 
masonry, plastering, weaving, furniture. — 
The Survey. 



Know the worth of your comrades by 
attending meetings. 



WORLD'S MERCHANT SHIPPING 



The world's merchant shipping in June, 1921, as reported by 
Lloyd's Register of British and foreign shipping just issued, com- 
prises 33,206 vessels of 100 gross tons or over, aggregating 61,974,- 
653 gross tons, the returns covering a considerable number of 
vessels on which work has begun, hut is not yet completed. The 
corresponding returns in June, 1920, reported 31,595 vessels of 57,- 
314,065 gross tons. Following is a summary according to 
nationality, the last item "flags not recorded," comprising former 
German steamers not yet definitely allocated among the allied 
nations, and various other ships : 





juntry 

ngdom 

New Zealand. 


si< ;i raers and mo- 
tor vessels 


Sailing vessels f 
1 


Grand total 




1 
Number] 


Gi'oss [ 
tonnage 


Number 


Gross 1 
tonnage 


1 
Number 


Gross 
tonnage 


British: 
United Ki 
Australia, 
Canada 

("nasi 


8,579| 19,320,053| 
570| 672,146 

54l| 835,275 

72| n;::.7. r »( 

1471 186.884 
415| 410,492 


456 

45 

348 

1 

1 « 

218 


251.5011 
21,791 

I 135,080 

f 10,486 
1 63,335 


9,034 

615 
1 
889 
72 
190 
633 


19,571.55 1 
693,937 

970,355 


Lakes 




163,756 


India and 
Other dor 


Ceylon 


197,369 
473,827 


Total 


10,324| 21,588,606| 

8,779 13,511,142 
468| 2,163,144 
96| 72,098 


1,109 

1,179 
26 

I 


482,192| 

1 1,185,946| 
1 91,786 
| 1,886 


11.133! 

1 

4,958| 

491 

99 


22,070,798 


United States: 

Sea 


14, 697, OSS 






2,254,930 


Philippine 


Islands 


73.9R4 


Total 


i.::i.3| 
1631 

351 

101 

122 

441 

587 

l.inill 

351 

145 

1.662 

t,090| 

342 

893 

, 2,033 

43 

1,730 

28 

ir.s 

37 

150 

689 

1.326 

40 

270 

371 


15,746,384| 

145.801 

546,641 

176,431 

99,567 

n;::,n:r 

50,178 

883,052 

2,208,4331 

29,779 

106,266 

8,298,798 

654,407 

687,251 

2.467,537 

| 8,354,801 

10,0 

2,371,051 

57,171 

250,1 '1 

| 73,97 

403, 67f 

1,111,563 

1,08 1 ' ! 

7::. ni 

H, [J 

765,39* 


1,208| 

46 

I 2 

51 

I 2S 


1,279,6181 

21.3531 
1 4.390 

22,889 
I 13,880 
| 


5,651| 

2091 

256 

402 

124 

122 

59 

798 

1,069 

901 

330 

■,ni i 

1,255 

36 I 

1.271 

1,03 1 

99 

1.889 

68 

284 

37 

465 

828 

L.35S 

5 1 
304 

ll i 


17,020.002 






167,154 


Belgian 




551.031 


Brazilian 


499,325 


Chilean 


1 1 :;. 1 17 




163,037 




'■" 

211 

(if, 

55 

188 

381 

168 

1 2i 

I 378 

| 


1 8.37S 

1 81,412 
17,354| 
11,404] 
1 92,097 
1 363,454 
| 63,013 
I 12,679 
I 183,036 
1 






964,464 


i mtch 


2,225.787 






41,1 S3 






198,352 




3,662,249 




717,15(1 




599,9 19 




2,650,673 




3,364,806 




1 

159 

1 !l 
121 

!| 


| L3.290 
| 213,007 

i| 29,991 
,| 16,726 
.| 


53 


Norwegian 




2,584,068 




87.107 


Portuguese 




296,847 




73.973 






1 v. 
139 

1 i 
1 8 
1 4( 


| s.7s:: 
! 53,978 
74,227 
II 12.78! 
1 11,502 
16.866 


412,4 




1,166,641 




1,16 






86,886 






218,765 




782,264 


Total 




28,433 


58,846,326 


1 4,77: 


! 


33,206 


61,974,663 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia — 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adeliade, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 14-16 Central Building, 41 
North John Street, Liverpool. 
BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 

Transportarbeiter Verband, Reichsabteilung 
Seeleute. Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, 
Germany. 

FRANCE 

General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan 7, 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 
Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Langgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldboeade, IS Copen- 
hagen. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Copenhagen. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, L. Strand- 
strade 20, Copenhagen. 

HOLLAND 
Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

ITALY 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Corso Principe Odoiie 2, Genoa, Italy. 
SPAIN 
Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle 
Inglaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Rcmadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedistinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 






THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 






the 

if the 

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an- 
111. within the 

will 
rincipally. 

1. 

them 
the 

led at 
imhia 
bined 

iden with 

rail- 

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Represented by 



at Third and Kearny 

All work done in 

our own sanitary 

workshop 

E. PEGUILLAN 



Established 
for 20 years 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 




MARINE ENGINEERING— NAVIGATION 

We prepare you for examination in four to six weeks — either course. 
Eighty dollars pays for individual instruction until you get your license. 

THE TECHNICAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

W. P. Plerson, Principal 
Phone Fillmore 9 7 0—2707 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Ahlstrom, Ellis 
Ahlstrom, Killan F. 
Apinaitis. Antony 
Anderson, J. A. 
Amundsen, Ben 
Allen, I. J. 
Allen, William 

son, Otto 
Anderson, Axel 
Anderson, Bill 
Anderson, A. B. 
Allen, E. 

In, George 
k, Christ 
Bachman, Peter 

\v. 
Riker, Eddie 

Chas. M. 
lijorseth, K. M. 
BeHKett. Chas. C. 
Horia, Mike 
I :reen, Thomas 
Bach, S. C. 
Bakke, Eilif J. 

rlgan, Reul B. 
Cooper, Oswald 

It, Joseph E. 

ring. Otto M. 

Ion, Earl 
1 lanielson, Alben 

A. 
Ertckson, Emanuel 

kson, Hans E. 
Kills, I. W. S. 
Etnmerz, Josef 
Engler, Samuel 
Elze, Carl 
Fielding, P. 
Eorsberg, Swen L. 
Framnes, A. 
Eugnian, Arthur 
r, Clarence 
Francis. William S. 

ii, Roy L. 
Gllklson, A. F. 
Gray, John 

k. Karl 

nan, Peter A. 
. ry, Russell B. 
Glaser, Jean 
Green, Joe 
Harris, Thomas 
Hall, Robert E. 
Halvorsen, Hans 

i man, H. 
Holman, Martin 
Hanson, William 
Harris, John T. 
Huber, Charles L. 
Hanson, O. 
1 1. .well, E. W. 
Hanson, Carl 
Holman, Martin 
Hofstad, Lester 
llenriksen, George 
Hines, Leo 
Hill, Charles 
Holmes, M. 
Hoino, Gust. 



Inguealsen, Arthur 
Jensen, Emanuel 
Johansen. Stefan 
Jensen, Chris 

-2278 
Johnson, E. 
Johnsen, Ben 
Jensen, E. Churs 
Joyce, Dan 
Koster, Walter 
Klaver, R. 
Karlsson, August 
Kopperman, H. 
Kluck, Karl 
Kaaveland. Thos. 
Kennedy, Bart 
Kelly, D. J. 
Kiepper, T. 
Korliz, Jack 
Kraus, Jack 
Larson, Chris 
Lundgren, Gust 
Law, H. C. 
Lackey, Chas. H. 

M. 
Lambers, G. B. 
Lesklnen, John 
Lewis, H. S. 
Lent, Frank 
Langerud, Henry 
McDonald, James 
Miller, Wlnford 
Mack, George W. 
Martin, Charles 
Mallkoft, Peter 
Meyer, Robert 
Morey, Art J. 
Mikkelsen, Harry 
Muldrose, W. L. 
Markim, Bernard 
Mackway, George 
McGregor 
Neuman, Alex 
Neuman, John C. 
Norberg, John E. 
Norgaard. Henry 
Norman, A. 
Nelson, Peter 
Nllsen, Christ 
Olson, John 
Olsen, Michael 
Olson. Tom 
Osterlund, A. J. 
Peppert, Fred C. 
Peterson, Carl A. 
Petersen, William 
Pettersen, John 
Paterson, George 
Petersen, Knut 
Pursi, Ernest 
Paysti, Anskelm 
Preston, E. 
Pope, Bert 
Pehle, Frank L. 
Rhodes, Russel C. 
Redondo, Manuel 
Rever, John T. 
Rosenau, J. 
Robertson, E. J. 



Rengsdorf, W. 
Sibley, Milton 
Sadling, Axell 
Spatig, Harvey B. 
Sauer, O. K. 
Samuelsen, Slgvart 
Sanderson 
Skaar, Jakol 
Skubber, Hans 
Skaar, O. W. 
Swansson, N. O. 
Smith, Carl J. 
Sltts, Bud 
Sinclair, P. 
Sterner, Charles 
Slade, I. S. 
Sanders, George 
Svansson, Ernest 
Toomey, Paul 
Thompson, Guy 
Thornquist, Adolf 
Tuhkanen, John J. 
Tolman, W. E. 
Torwlck, H. 
Taylor, Bert 
Tingstrom, A. R. 
Taylor, J. G. 
Veits, Clayton L. 



OLD KENTUCKY TOBACCO 

ear old leaf. Ripe, Rich, Nature 
Cured. "The Kind That Made Ken- 
tucky Famous." Chewing or smok- 
ing. 3 lbs. $1.00 postpaid. 

KENTUCKY TOBACCO ASSN. 
W 452, Hawesvllle, Ky. 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. G. Swanson Is not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP°OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



Tacoma, Wash. 



Phone Main 2941 

SEAMEN! 

.M. el your friends for a Rood time 
In pool and cards at 

H. BADER'S 

CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 

2116 North 30th Street Old Town 

Tacoma, Wash. 



SEAMEN!— 

When In it at the 

North Star Restaurant 

Strictly Union House 

NERHEIM & STROM, Proprietors 

North SO, Old Town 
Ta< oma. Wash. 



Weber, Fred C. 
Westley, W. E. 
Walter, E. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Witravamen, Geo. 
Warnick, A. D. 
Walters, Fred L. 
Wohn, Otje 
Wolff, Herbert 
Wood, E. E. 
White, William 
Wi-rtanen, Frans 
Willey, Edward 
York, Chas. E. 
REGISTERED 
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Peterson, Carl 
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Worgaard. H. 
PACKAGES 
Adams, H. C. 
Heaps, James 
La Born, Roy 
Okasskl, Welling- 
ton 
Scarthland, Gunnar 
Williams. Edward 



INFORMATION WANTED 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It is Increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA x^OLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Foliette Is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he la be- 
. ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other man in public life. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year — Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine. Madison. Wis. 



Fred Klein, who left New Orleans 
on the S. S. "Lake Ferona" in 
March, 1920, is inquired for by his 
father, L. Klein. Address, care the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion, 543 Bienville Street, New 
Orleans, La. Charles Thoresen, 
Agent. 



SINGLE ROOMS 



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369 First Street Phone Douglas 604 

SINGLE HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 

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Anyone knowing how Eugene Mc- 
Xulty, coalpasser, met his death re- 
cently at Boat Harbor, Newport 
News, Va., while employed on S. S. 
"Co'quit," will confer a favor on his 
mother, Mrs. Frances McNulty, 511 
Hemlock street, Scranton, Pa., or 
Silas B. Axtell, 9 State street, New 
York City, by communicating with 
either one. 



THE 

JAMES H. BARRY CO. 

The Star "Press 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

We print ■'The Seamen's Journal" 



ALBERT MICHELSON, Attor- 
ney-at-law; attorney for Marine 
Firemen & VVatertenders' Union; 
Admiralty law a specialty. 676 Mills 
Bldg., Telephone Douglas 1058. Resi- 
dence Phone Prospect 2908. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of William Peterson, born in Nor- 
way, last heard of in Bayonne, N. J., 
when he quit the S. S. "Gulfland" on 
November 11, 1918; is requested to 
communicate with Joseph A. Moran, 
43 Ship street, or John Ward, 489 
Eddy street, Providence, R. I, 

4-27-21 



To Scandinavian Sailors: 

Inheritances collected. Money 
forwarded to all places in Sweden, 
Norway, and Denmark to banks 
or private persons at lowest rates. 
Full guarantee. 

LEONARD GEORGES, 
General Passenger Agent Swedish- 
American Line, 268 Market St. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllilllllllM 




lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfllllllllll 

Disarmament Is Possible If People 
Make Demand 

If the public accept militarists and com- 
mercial expansionists as authority on ar- 
mament, the nation is headed lor a kaiser- 
ized democracy. 

[f the public permit racial prejudice to 
grip them they must pay the cost in back- 
breaking taxes for military establishments. 

If the public neglect domestic markets 
to aid commercial expansionists in foreign 
lands, the alleged gain will be more than 
neutralized by battleship costs and pre- 
paredness bonds. 

Today our country votes dollars for war 
and pennies for construction and peace. 

Out of every dollar appropriated by 
Congress in 1920, 93 6-10 cents was for 
war and its effects and 6 4-10 cents for 
peace. 

This policy can be changed if the people 
refuse to longer accept the viewpoints of 
those who profit by war. 

The conscience of the nation must be 
massed behind the armament conference 
that will convene in Washington, Novem- 
ber 11. 

On that date demonstrations under the 
auspices of organized labor will be held 
throughout the land, and President Gom- 
pers has cabled the suggestion to orga- 
nized labor in England, France, Italy and 
japan that similar action be taken by 
them. 

The immensity of these meetings, their 
determination and their inclusion of all 
citizens should stagger the militarist and 
standpatter. 

These militarists are not invincible. 
They are powerful because they continue 
unchallenged. They can be engulfed in a 
.Niagara of public opinion for disarmament. 

The people can sweep them aside as 
chaff and bend every public official to their 
will if they but express it. Most public 
officials would welcome this force. 

Militarism thrives on the people's awe of 
an alleged power, on their indifference to 
duties, and on the false concept of those 
who imagine that shouts to the flag is 
patriotism of a high order. 

The alleged power of privilege and 
greed is ludicrous before determined, in- 
telligent citizens. 

Labor's Armistice Day demonstrations 
should be taken advantage of by every 
believer in harmony and concord between 
nations. 

Those who block this ideal should be 
shoved aside. 

Petty partisanship and the struggle of 
individuals for prestige and place are 
nothing. 

The one question is: "Shall our country 
stop building war machines and devote 
our energies to construction and peace?" 

Nothing else is important. Nothing else 
counts. The question reaches into every 
home, into every pocketbook, into every 
pay envelope in America. 

Shun the man who ignores the great 
principle involved and discusses individ- 
uals, incidents of side issues. 

Vitalize the A. F. of L.'s 40-year de- 
mand for peace. 



MllIlllilllllllllBIIIPIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIlllllllfl 

Judicial Respect is Weakened 

Justice Strong of the Supreme Court of 
Kings County, New York, is the latest 
injunction judge to bring the judiciary 
into contempt. 

In a decision that prohibits striking 
leather workers from picketing, the court 
handed down an opinion that sounds like 
a Citizen's Alliance Screed. The workers 
struck when the employer broke his con- 
tract with them. 

The Court took occasion to utter the 
cheap slander that labor "held the Govern- 
ment by the throat'' during the war. 

The Court also appeals to racial preju- 
dice when he ignores the rights of men 
accused of crime and says that many of 
the defendants "are foreigners." Around 
this statement he dwells on the impotency 
of laws to check immigration, while ignor- 
ing recent statements by immigration 
officials that steamship companies arc 
ignoring the law and there is no way to 
check them unless new legislation penalizes 
them. 

The court shines, however, when he 
discusses the union's minimum wage scale. 
This is his Citizen's Alliance drivel: 

"Any attempt to equalize the strength 
or brains of individuals is an attempt to 
deprive the individual of the right of free- 
dom which a free country guarantees to 
its citizens. Yet labor delegates have 
decreed that all men must work the same 
number of hours and at the same wage 
according to a classification. They fix a 
scale of wages applicable to all, weak and 
strong, of mental power or lacking it. As 
a result, we find that men of different 
walks in life arc not paid a proportionate 
amount for the labor furnished. There 
exists an inequality which works an in- 
justice to some, while others arc getting 
far more than a fair return for the services 
rendered. The great law of supply and 
demand as well as the law of equal rights 
has been set at naught." 



Courts Usurp Power, Says Western Judge 

In refusing to issue an injunction 
against striking coal miners on the ground 
that the miners are peaceful, Superior 
Court Judge Griffiths at Seattle, Wash., 
acknowledged that injunction judges usurp 
powers which must be used judiciously. 

Despite the court's admission of judicial 
usurpation he refused the injunction only 
because the employers did not present 
sufficient evidence to warrant him to 
"supersede the ordinary law of the land." 

"I think a court of equity ought to be 
reluctant to supersede the ordinary law 
of the land," said the court. 

This statement is an indorsement of 
labor's opposition to the labor injunction. 
The workers insist that where strikers are 
charged with crime they should be 
accorded trial rights that the meanest 
criminal is never denied. 

The workers are continually pointing 
out that the injunction process is never 
(Continued on Page 9) 

S. T. Hogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer, Seamen's 
cases a specialty. Sixth rloor, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1880.— Adv. 



| Iiiternation Union 

| ica 

llllllllllllllll! 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILOBS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY .1. PRYOR, Secretary 

1% Lewis Street 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 67-G9 Front Street 

BALTIMORE, Md C. RASMUSSEN, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA. I'., O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

13 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON, Ag«nt 

123 r l Ird Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN. Agent 

60% Saint Michael Sireet 

NEW ORLEANS, La CHA1 >RSEN, Agent 

206 Julia Si n 
PORT ARTHDl i SAM HALL, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex L. LARSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE. R. I CHARLES MARTELL, Agent 

369 South Main Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R I I WIS, Agent 

437 Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEON W. MENDEL, Agent 

707 Palafox Street 

TAMPA, Fla 

205 Polk Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C ERNEST II. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South SI 

H. i lent 

W. L. CART1 urer 

Telephoni ne Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y D E GRANGE, .' 

514 Gi 

BOSTON, Mass T. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long V 
NEW ORLEANS, La. I; T. KAIZER, A 

228 Lafayette Street 
NORFOLK, Va. w l I. SIGGE 

411 Union St t • 

BALTIMORE, Mil IT. MEYERS, Agent 

L710 l hames Street 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa FRANK NOLAN. Agent 

140 South Third Street 
GALVESTON, Tex. CHAS. F. BULLOCK, ' 

Twenty-first street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S. OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CA1 retary 

70 South St. Rhone John 075 and 076 
Branches: 
NEW YORK, N. Y, ilES LYNCH, A 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. JAMES J. B'UREY, v 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

sn| Sou 
NEWPORT NEWS, Va, SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

Cwentj i ird 
PORT ARTHUR, Tex. F. J. JOHNSON, ' 

GALVESTON, Tex I. KOMISKI] 

Ave. E. 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN. Agent 

: State Sh 
NORFOLK, Va, PI IP; Agent 

513 East Main Street 
NEW ORLEANS La DAN LYONS. ' 

:, 1 1 Toulo 

MOBILE. Ala V. McCABE, A 

L04 South Com I reet 

PROVIDENCE, K. i H \i:i:y RIDLEY, \ 

S \V \.\NAII. <;... 

L03 
CHARLESTON, S, C, WM. 1 1. WILSON, A 

ive Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 102 Atlanti 

WM. H BR< iWN, Secretary 

Branches * 

in . n 

I Main so, 
NEW YORK, N Y. JAMES J. PAGAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

ATLANTIC CITY. N.J... H. F McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 
II. ESI 
HOBOKBN, N. J. 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
NEW HAVEN, Conn 13* Collls Street 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Published Weekly at San Francisco 
by THE 

SAILORS" UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 

lilffll;:/ 

J. VANCE THOMPSON Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TRRMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.60 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office. Martime Hall Bldg., 

6» Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of 
October 3. 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1921. 



WHAT DOES IT MEAN? 



The Commission of Enquiry which made 

the Report on the Steel Strike, for the In- 
terchurch World Movement, has recently 
displayed a burst of activity and released some 
information of real live interest. Coming 
as it does at this time, there are possibilities 
of peculiar significance in this connection. 

For upwards of nineteen centuries a strug- 
gle for power has existed, generally between 
State and Church. Sometimes the State was 
represented by Kingly power. Aristocratic, 
or Bureaucratic power; but there was always 
a balance which was maintained by the 
masses. 

Whenever either of these contending forces 
needed aid they sought support of the 
masses, which resulted in temporary benefit 
to the latter; hut when the necessity was 
over such rights and privileges as had heen 
permitted by the more powerful were par- 
tially or wholly withdrawn. 

During the last century a new power has 
arisen (Capitalism) which has surpassed in 
absolutism anything ever before conceived. 

The power of kings and influence of 
aristocrats has been swept away, and even 
the Church has heen made to feel the effect 
of this new potential force. 

At its very inception the Interchurch 
World Movement encountered serious and 
unexpected obstacles, the surmounting 
which will furnish some interesting study. 
Crumbs of enlightenment can he garnered 
by the masses if they are vigilant and in- 
telligent. 

The application of disciplinary tactics was 
made very noticeable in relation to the Steel 
Industry investigation, hut the occasion may 
now he ripe for temporary armistice. 

Approximately forty million have been 
killed, maimed or starved, and the welfare 
of nearly two hundred millions directly af- 
fected, while the whole generation must 
suffer through the ravages of the late World 
War, while the dreadful peace has left the 
world prostrate. 

Predatory wealth, internationally organ 
ized and internationally absolute, has done its 
worst, and the masses have little more to 
fear. Most of those who did the actual 



fighting are either without means or on the 
borders of uncertainty. Most of the "small 
patriots" who furnished the necessities of 
the fighters by their work, and buying bonds 
"till it hurt." have heen milked dry. They 
have heen compelled to relinquish not only 
their bonds hut other surplus in order to 
live. The stage was sit. the actors regu- 
lated, and the play is complete. Perhaps 
fear of critical review by society makes a 
temporary armistice acceptable. 

And now it can easily he observed that 
the stage is being sel for the next act. and 
a desire to start the wheels of industry once 
more in commercial nations is evident. The 
squeezing process is complete and the wealth 
has heen directed into the right channels at 
last. A concern for unemployment in Eu- 
rope, as will as America, is now displayed 
which suggests (hat the drive on the masses 
■■ the. time being, at an end; therefore 
the chloroforming process should naturally 
he the next operation in order. 

W'e have struggled against misery, priva- 
tion and Uncertainty, with the Sword of 
Damocles ever over our heads. Now that 
we have suffered the worst, are our sacrifices 
to he in vain? Shall we permit ourselves 
to be used again, or to he choloroformed 
into a new sleep; or will we insist, if we 
arc to listen to new preachments, that they 
include the meaning of the Prophet 1 
that those who build the houses shall inhabit 
them, and those that till the soil shall eat 
the harvest thereof? ft may depend upon 
armistice terms: the masses must he vigilant. 



SAIhoRS SHOULD ATTEND 
MEETINGS 



Even as nations writhe and mill in 
throes of reconstruction and readjustment 
after hard and prolonged struggles 
do the organizations of labor after battle 
upon the industrial fields. Many serious 
obstacles must he surmounted and diffi- 
culties straightened. 

The contest has revealed all the weak 
points and mistakes in operation, and it is 
necessary to carefully guard against those 
detrimental qualities in the readjustment. 
All the various elements, many of them 
seriously conflicting, strive to inculcate 
their own particular ideas into the con- 
struction and usually those who make the 
greatest effort and display the most stay- 
ing qualities prevail. Therefore, it is the 
duty of every member of the union to 
attend the meetings on all possible occa- 
sions; to look strictly into the details of 
organization work; to assist in shaping 
the policy, and to map future plans. Dis- 
cussion should he educational and con- 
structive with the personal aspect elimi- 
nated. 

Those who are actually sailing, and in- 
tend to follow the calling in spite of 
present conditions: who have determined 
to remedy the evils existent and to im- 
prove the external circumstances of the 
industry, should particularly take the 
keenest interest in the union meetings at 
this time. Unless the utmost vigilance 
prevails the course of the organization is 
in danger of being molded by a reactionary 
clement within our ranks, who seldom sail, 
hut have kept their standing in the union 
for purposes known only to themselves. 
There are quite a number of these indi- 
viduals and they can always be relied upon 



to take adverse attitude on every question 
vital to the interest of those actually en- 
gaged at the calling. That which is every- 
body's business generally becomes nobody's 
business, so it becomes absolutely neces- 
sary for the real seamen within the organ- 
ization to attend strictly to the meetings, 
exercise their membership rights, and give 
the organization the full benefit of their 
ideas. ( >nly by these means can mistakes 
of the past be avoided, and beneficial 
results obtained. 



A NEED FOR UNITY 



In whatever direction the complacent 
trade unionist may turn at this time, he 
will observe certain intellectual labor men 
nerally termed radicals — who are mak- 
ing every endeavor to meet the aggressions 
of capitalistic exploitation which, since the 
termination of the war have been more 
severe than ever before. These progres- 
sives, however, are seriously handicapped, 
due to the fact that the employers are 
given help and support by a great num- 
ber of narrow-minded labor skates and 
demagogues who. in order to save their 
power, prestige and pie-card, make every 
effort to keep labor separated, and in case 
of trouble to pit one labor group against 
the other. 

This condition is particularly pro- 
nounced in the United States and Ameri- 
can workers can sing a song of intrigue 
unbeatable. Trade unions have been lined 
Up against each other, by incompetent or 
grafting officials, in the same manner as 
contending armies, while the empolyers 
have had little difficulty in crushing them 
both. 

However, such defeats can he credited 
largely to the ignorance and carelessness 
of the workers themselves, who take too 
much stock in politicians and demagogues 
or are content to "let George do it.'' 

In European countries where the work- 
ers arc considerably handicapped by laws 
which practically compel them to scab on 
their fellow workers. thc\ are resisting this 
situation to the utmost. 

A demonstration to this effect was given 
in the late general strike in Sweden, when 
the Swedish transport workers struck 
against a 20 per cent reduction, and suc- 
ceeded in completely tying up marine 
transportation. Their efforts were fore- 
doomed, however, due to the fact that 
Germany captured the Swedish trade, their 
ships going in and out of the Swedish 
ports unhampered. 

Commenting on the situation, the union 
seamen of Germany state that it is with, 
sorrow they admit that the gallant strug- 
gles of the Swedish transport workers 
were vain, partly due to German ships 
and German sailors doing work that he- 
longed to the strikers. The German sea- 
nun did not willingly scab on the Swedish 
fellow workers, hut were compelled to do 
SO by virtue of their marine laws. 

Great numbers of seamen were taken 
back to Germany as prisoners for refusal 
to load or unload their vessels in Swedish 
ports. 

These facts prove that labor has yet to 
free itself from chattel slavery, in which 
it is now bound, and the rank and file of 
the workers must take the initiative or 
force the issue. However effective so- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



called leaders, capable champions, etc., 
may have been in the past, their ideas 
have become obsolete and inadequate. 
They must give way to progress, and if 
they don't the workers will be under the 
necessity of removing them as serious 
obstacles in the way to emancipation of 
labor. FR. HARMS. 



More complete returns from the elec- 
tions just held in Sweden indicate an al- 
most clean sweep for the official Socialist 
party. In the capital city the Socialists 
won nine seats out of fifteen, the Con- 
servatives six and the Liberals one. The 
sole Liberal was Nils Eden, former pre- 
mier. Communists voted with Socialists, 
and, under the system of proportional rep- 
resentation, they secured their first deputy. 
The Socialists won forty-three deputies in 
the entire country, against twenty-eight 
Conservatives, thirteen Liberals and five 
Agrarians. The vote in Stockholm alone 
was: Socialist, 77,037; Conservative, 48,- 
369; Liberal, 14,387; Prohibitionist, 7157. 



The public evening navigation school 
closed for the mid-term vacation last week 
when the largest class since the war was 
graduated. The school will reopen at 7:15 
p. m., October 17, when a new class will 
be organized in the Ferry Building. Per- 
sons desiring to enroll are requested to 
present themselves at that time. 



A CONVICT PROSPECTOR 



Long before Arthur Bayley discovered 
gold at Coolgardie, the knowledge of the 
precious mineral at that place was known 
to a convict named Mundine Joe, who was 
an assigned servant in the party of Hunt, 
the explorer and an officer of the West 
Australian survey. Traveling for several 
years in the almost waterless territory ex- 
tending from the Darling Ranges to Nulla- 
gine and eastward towards the South Aus- 
tralian border, the convict had ample 
means at his disposal to examine the 
country. On one occasion, when he ac- 
companied Hunt on a surveying tour in 
the country afterwards known as Cool- 
gardie, Mundine Joe found indications of 
gold that were eventually the means of 
inducing Bayley and Ford to prospect the 
country from Southern Cross to Hannan's, 
and finally to eventuate in the pegging out 
of "Bayley's Reward Claim." The convict 
prospector did not reveal the whereabouts 
of his discovery. He was aware that he 
would not benefit from it in any way, as 
he still saw many years ahead of him as an 
assigned servant. Many years afterwards, 
when the sensational rescue of a party of 
Irish political prisoners by an American 
schooner took place at Rottnest, Ireland, 
an American journalist went to West Aus- 
tralia to write up an account of the affair, 
and during the course of his wanderings 
came across Mundine Joe. He write a 
short pamphlet, in which the convict's ex- 
periences largely predominated. It is sup- 
posed that the prospecting trip afterwards 
taken by Bayley and Ford was from cer- 
tain information given in this book. 
Hunt's tracks were found close to many of 
the big finds in the W. A. gold fields, so 
that he and his party were practically 
often standing on a fortune when they 
were toiling for a small remuneration at a 
hazardous employment. 



PATERNALISM VS. TRADE 
UNIONISM 



The Pennsylvania Railroad is circulariz- 
ing the country with a pamphlet which 
eulogizes the paternal pension system of 
that corporation. 

In opposition to this system is the pen- 
sion plan of organized labor, illustrated by 
the International Typographical Union's 
pension system. The difference between 
the two plans are : 

Railroad employes and officials from 
sixty-five to sixty-nine years of age, in- 
clusive, who, after thirty years or more 
in the service become disqualified from 
"active duty," are "eligible" for pension. 

The union printer automatically draws 
a pension if he is sixty years of age, has 
been in good standing in the union for 
twenty years, and fails to secure sustain- 
ing employment. 

Railroad's pension is based on 1 per cent 
of the employe's or official's regular 
monthly pay for the ten years immedi- 
ately preceding retirement, multiplied by 
the years he has been in the service of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, but no pension 
must be less than $15 a month. Under 
this system if a worker was employed 
thirty years and his average monthly pay 
for the last ten years was $80, his pension 
would be thirty times 80 cents, or $24 a 
month. 

The printer pensioner receives a flat $8 
a week without running the risk of hav- 
ing his wages cut in his declining years, 
and have these rates the basis for his pen- 
sion. Wages earned by the pensioner are 
not considered under the union system. 

Pennsylvania Railroad officials admin- 
ister that pension. The printers admin- 
ister theirs, with every member of the 
union — pensioners included — having a 
voice and vote in ics affairs. 

The railroad maintains its pension en- 
tirely by funds taken from its treasury. 
This "generosity" is always made public 
when the railroad wants to lower working 
conditions or check a wage movement. 

The union maintains its pension by a 
stated assessment of members. 

The union printer never endangers his 
pension when he strikes to improve work- 
ing conditions. He does not have some 
employer pass judgment on his qualifica- 
tions for a pension. If his earning powers 
are reduced in his later years, this does 
not affect his pension. His pension is not 
a dole or a charity — it is his because he 
paid for it. 

The publicity this railroad gives its 
paternalism indicates the mental attitude 
of a corporation that acknowledged it ex- 
pended $800,000 in 1913 to maintain a 
private army and has recently defied the 
United States Railroad Labor Board in an 
effort to establish its company "union" and 
drive off its system every bona fide labor 
organization. 

The railroad states that during the first 
six months of 1921 it paid $1,354,692.03 in 
pensions. This is an average of $2,709,- 
384.06 for the year. Against this ex- 
penditure by one of the country's mightiest 
corporations, the International Typo- 
graphical Union, without brass band or 
newspaper publicity, quietly reports thai 
for the year ending May 31 last there' 
were 1683 pensioners on the rolls, and they 



piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

OFFICIAL 

IlllilllillllllllllllliillllllllllllllliB 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 3, 1921. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Joseph Faltus presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slack; several steam-schooners 
are laying up. Quarterly Finance Committee 
was elected to examine the Union's accounts 
for the past three' months. 

R. INGWARDSEN, 
Secretary pro tem. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Phone 

Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 26, 1921. 
Shipping and prospects dull. 

R. TOWNSEND. Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W. W. O.' Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 26, 1921. 
Shipping fair. 

A. KLEMMSEN, Agent. 
2016 X. 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 26, 1921. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
S4 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 26, 1921. 
Shipping in steam-schooners fair. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 28. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 26, 1921. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 26, 1921. 
Shipping dull. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 19, 1921. 
Shipping picking up. 

WILLIAM HARDY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 

DIED 

W. H. Gardner, No. 1521, a native of England, 
age 21. Died September 28, 1921. 

Jul Strelneek, No. 2252, a native of Russia, 
age 37. Died at Seattle, Wash., Sept. 26, 1921. 

S— 3— Bl—EM MBttBUU i mJ gMaBaMB— K 

were paid $700,128 during that period. 

The two systems represent two distinct 
lines of thought on the industrial field — ■ 
the railroad, with its paternalism, and the 
union with its self-help and independence. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad is the recog- 
nized leader of the anti-union, low-wage 
movement of the nation's transportation 
systems. 



HUGE POWDER PROFITS 



Writing in the Nation's Business, Pierre 
S. DuPont of the DuPont Powder Com- 
pany, Wilmington, Del., declares that 
powder firms do not make money on wars. 

This statement, however, does not tally 
with reports by the Poors and Moody's 
Industrials on profits made by the Du- 
Ponts from 1914 to 1918. 

In 1914 clear profits totaled $5,769,132; 
in 1915, $57,840,758; in 1916, $82,107,693; 
in 1917, $49,248,662; in 1918, $43,098,075. 

The company, the Industrials say, paid 
no dividends on common stock in 1914. 
In 1915 they paid 11 per cent; 1916, 100 
per cent; 1917, 51 per cent; 1918, 26 per 
cent. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE TEST 

'■ \ \Y. 



oing through 

cry local 

I Hod ' ■ • i t_v na- 

the effect of 

and i' the labor 

put to 

will demonstrate 

uns of the 

in and it will 

■ -innate of 

'.■■ by Labor since the 

■ ■ :' sail on a smi ioth 
! ship to stand the 
pringing 
. 

tn sail a ship in 

iling skies, but it 

. w itli backbone and cour- 

into the har- 

ilows like a hurricane 

d for the rocks. With the 

man at the 

pumps and I . things may 

ig and 
stick to their 

but it is also 

i cleaning. 

find out how many real. 

decl to the 

We 

i how many there are 

al stand- 

persever- 

to count 

to their obli- 

ln e who 

union for selfish motives, 

when put to a real test. 

d through an era of 

Work was plentiful, 

i obs easy to get. 

and unorganized, 

dent and courage ran high. 

- it was easy to 

inlands, rptit one job 

and or d clare strikes. 

i under those 

! >id the; give up in 

ut of their manu- 

ciatioi 1 )id they lay 

I quit ? ( >f course they did not 

their 

i. for they knew that 

i i momic conditions 

that a time would come 

on would turn in their 

\ henever and w here- 

i i- - | he) gave in 

de upon them 

without making any fight. At other times 

ing and hitter battles, 

: all .tin , I eir organiza- 

for another day. 

nomic situation has 

hard, jol carce, 

treets looking 

rid what do you 

find i * Where are the 

Where are 
loudest in their 
drastic action ? 1 tow 
est? 

ins will show 
movement i 
ill lomori aw. It 

rigth and the real 



quality of those who make up our move- 
ment. 

Those who have a real understanding of 
the age-long struggles of the workers are 
standing (irmly by their unions, for they 
know that the workers have had to go 
through many such critical periods in the 
past and that they will pass through many 
more in the future. They know that the 
upward struggle of the workers is one 
that will last as long as mankind in- 
habits the earth, for the aim of humanity 
is to advance upward and ever upward. 

To them a crisis of this kind is only one 
of the milestones with which progress is 
measured. It is only one of the tests 
that eliminate the weak and unfit, and out 
of which is developed the staunch material 
from which real, permanent, fighting or- 
ganizations are made. 

Some have deserted because they know- 
no better, because they do not under- 
stand, because they are not class 
conscious; hut they will learn in the 
school of hard knocks and from the ex- 
periences they are now having'. 

Others have deserted because they are 
weak, because they are tired of the strug- 
gle and because they have lost hope. With 
them a reaction has set in and, for the 
time being, they are willing to take things 
as tlu-y arc and submit without further 
struggle. They will develop strength and 
regain hope and recover from the reaction, 
for in the- final analysis the reaction will 
become monotonous and they will discover 
that submission onl) calls for more and 
more submission and that in the end they 
will become slaves unless they develop 
strength and hope and resume their places 
in the ranks. 

A few may try to curry favor with the 
employers in the vain hope that they will 
be given positions that will make them 
secure from all further worry over eco- 
nomic problems. Theirs is a vain hope, 
for they will wake up eventually to find 
that they have only been used used as a 
shoe rag to be cast aside. 

Labor is going to meet the test and 
come through with a larger army of tried 
and true workers than ever In 
Marking time is the order of the day now. 
but the advance will be certain and sure 
when the order to march forward is given. 

The Auto Worker. 



ALEXANDER HOWAT'S ADDRESS 
IN COURT 

The Workers' Chronicle, Pittsburg, 
Kansas, gives the following account ot 
the proceedings in Court when Alexander 
llowat and August Dorchy were fined and 
sentenced to jail for calling a strike: 

Judge Frank W. boss of the Cherokee 
County District Court, sitting at Colum- 
bus, last Friday, denied a new trial in 
the case of President Alexander 1 low at 
and Vice-President August Dorchy. who 
were found guilty of a "misdemeanor" by 
a jury on July 1 for calling a strike at 
the Mackie mines to enforce the payment 
of wages to a young miner, which was 
nearly two years past due, and sentenced 
them to six months each in jail and to 
a line of $500 apiece. 

The jury claimed that the Court's in- 

* structions hound them to either find the 

defendants guilty of a felony or a mis- 



demeanor, and that they found them 
guilty of a lesser charge. 

After the trial eleven of the jurors 
signed an affidavit that they were forced 
to find against the defendants on account 
of the Court's instructions, but each be- 
lieved them innocent of any wrong-doing. 

At the hearing Judge boss overruled 
the motion for a new trial, as was ex- 
pected of him. After stating that he 
spoke for Mr. Dorchy, his co-defendant, 
as well as for himself. Mr. llowat ad- 
dressed the Court as follows: 

"We did not believe a law could be 
1 in Kansas making it a crime for a 
few men to strike to make a greedy cor- 
poration pay money it owed a poor- boy 
with a widowed mother and several broth- 
ers and sisters whom he supported. 

" I hiring the World War we honored 
the young men who shed their blood for 
liberty, justice and democracy on the 
fields of France. We believe that those 
who are fighting for justice for the work- 
ers in this country now are entitled to 
just as much honor. 

"We do not feel that we have com- 
mitted any crime. I hope that the time 
will never come when it will he a crime 
to force a corporation to pay a bov money 
it has owed him for a year and a half. 
The strike was called as a last resort, 
not to curtail production of coal, for it 
did not, but to force payment of money 
that the operators had a year and a half 
before admitted that they owed this boy. 

"We feel that this law, as interpreted 
by this Court, is nothing short of an 
outrage and a disgrace to Kansas. It is 
for the purpose of destroying organized 
labor. If it succeeds it is a violation of the 
provision of the United States Constitu- 
tion that there shall be no involuntary 
servitude. 

"A lew months ago we were sentenced 
to a year in jail by another Court for this 
same strike. I had always been told that 
it was contrary to the Constitution to 
punish a man twice for the same offense. 
1 don't know where the end will be. 
Perhaps the next Legislature will arrange 
it SO a man can be punished three or 
four times for the same offense. 

"We do not think we were committing 
a crime. We thought we were doing our 
duty, doing what was right. Regardless 
of the consequences, we will keep on 
lighting until the law is wiped off the 
statute books. We are fighting for justice 
and the principles of justice. 

"We are not asking you for any pity, 
leniency or sympathy. All we desire is 
justice. 

"We believed at first we could get jus- 
tice. As the trial progressed we saw the 
Court was prejudiced. The Court refused 
to let union men sit on the jury. \\ e 
haven't received justice in this Court. 

"They may anil probably will put me 
in prison, but I'd rather be put in jail 
than stay out by surrendering my prin- 
ciples." 

llowat said that he did not intend to 
say anything to offend the Court and if 
he had said anything that sounded so it 
was because he was not a lawyer. 

"We're read) for sentence." he con- 
cluded. 

Ihe judge then asked Dorchy if he 
had anything to say. 

"Mr. llowat has spoken for both of us," 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Dorchy replied. "There is nothing I can 
add to what lie has said and nothing 
I want to take away from it." 

The Court's answer to President 
Howat's remarks was based mainly upon 
his private opinion that a law upon the 
statute hooks must be obeyed, whether 
it is good or had, and that, in this in- 
stance, circumstances do not alter the 
case, as they often do when any judge 
is so inclined. Following this exhibition 
of prejudice against the miners the Court 
pronounced sentence. 



WHAT IS LIFE? 



There was once a philosopher. He 

lived in a cherry orchard and he had eight 
sons. No one knew to what school of 
thought he belonged, hut he had the repu- 
tation of being a sage, so nobody ques- 
tioned the fact. 

One day his sons came to him and said: 
''Father, there is a riddle that none of us 
can solve. We beseech you to tell us the 
answer, because you are old and very 
wise. What is Life?" 

The Philosopher gave an inward groan. 
The day was warm, sunny, blue and 
golden, full of the murmur of bees and the 
singing of birds. TTe did not feel in a 
mood for answering questions. Besides, 
like many philosophers, he did not know 
the answer himself. 

"My sons," he said, solemnly, "thai is 
a riddle which I want you to solve with- 
out my help: Go out, follow each of you 
a different calling, live your own life and 
find out for yourselves what the world 
means. At the end of five years come 
back here and give me your definition of 
Life." 

So the eight young men set forth, and 
their father, having for the momenl es- 
caped from philosophy- -which is the art 
iif providing plausible answers to insoluble 
problems — gave a sigh of relief and went 
on eating cherries. 

Five years later the eight young men 
came hack. All the cherries were ripe, 
and the Philosopher was sitting in the 
orchard eating the luscious red fruit off 
a green plate, lie welcomed his sons in 
that affectionate yet detached manner by 
which you may know the Philosopher 
wherever you meet him, and called upon 
each in turn to give an answer to the 
riddle. 

"Life," said the first — a cynical fellow 
in a Tinker's apron — "is a tin kettle, 
bright and shining without, and hollow 
within, full of bubbles and vapor, some- 
times hot and sometimes cold; it is always 
wearing into holes, and we spend our time 
trying to mend it and patch it, until at 
last it wears out and we throw it away." 

"Life," said the second — a Tailor, sanc- 
timonious and sententious — "is a piece of 
stuff given to each man to make a coat — 
rich velvet to some, narrow homespun to 
others. Each must cut his coat, accord- 
ing to his cloth, and as he makes it so 
must he wear it, long or short, patterned 
or plain, well fitting or ill." 

"Life," said the Soldier son, with heart) 
vigor, "is war in which no man knows 
friend from enemy ; in which there are 
many skirmishes and few decisive battles; 
in which every one thinks he knows for 
what he is fighting, but no one is quite 



sure; yet, in truth, the cause matters Httle 
so long as we have the chance to fight." 

"Life," said the Sailor son, who had 
the blue of far distances in his eyes, "is 
the ship we steer across the ocean of 
Time. If we set our sails skillfully, pro- 
vision ourselves well, and escape from 
mutiny, tempest and shipwreck, we may 
one day come to harbor; no man knows 
what the port is like, and the wise ones 
do not care, so long as the weather's fair 
and the voyage merry." 

"Life," said the fifth son, who was 
white-fingered and a fine Gentleman, "is 
a play-house, and we are the audience. 
We hiss the villain, applaud the hero, and 
kiss our hands to the leading lady; as 
for the author — whose name is not on the 
playbill — we blame him when the piece is 
tedious and forget his existence when we 
are entertained ; and at the fall of the 
curtain we drive home yawning to bed." 

"Life." said the Apothecary, in his long 
black rope, "is an apothecary's store, full 
of divers drugs from which we take our 
choice. Knowing little of chemistry, we 
frequently judge the contents of the bottle 
by the color of the glass, and do not dis- 
cover until afterwards whether the phial 
contained poison or elixir, nightshade, all- 
heal or bittersweet." 

"Life," said the seventh son, a Plough- 
hoy, whose words were few and halting, 
"is just a field we have to plough, wide 
or narrow, clay, loam or marl. Some 
stumble from side to side and plough a 
crooked furrow; some go by a distant tree 
and plough a straight one. 'Tis simple 
enough." 

The last of the eight was a Thief with 
a crafty face. 

"Life is a strong-box full of treasure, 
which men are ever trying to steal; some 
only bruise their knuckles on the hard 
iron; some manage to break in and snatch 
a handful of coin; the wise spend it at 
once and enjoy it. but the foolish hoard 
it up and wander about forever afterwards 
fleeing from justice. A few are caught 
and hanged, but most of them live to a 
ripe old age." 

The Phiosopher looked at his eight sons 
in silence. 

"bather," they said, "which of us is 
right?" 

"You are all right — and you are all 
wn nig." 

"Put there cannot be eight answers to 
one question." 

"There arc eighty — eighty hundred— 
eighty thousand, as many as there are 
men on the earth." 

"And which solves the riddle?" 

"Nobody knows — yet." 

"Hut when shall we know?" they per- 
sisted. 

The Philosopher was tired of all this; 
the day was warm, sunny, blue and 
golden, and the cherries were ripe, and 
he wanted to go to sleep. But there was 
his reputation to keep up. So be said : 

"As to that, my sons, I will consult the 
wisdom of the Cherry Stones." And he 
began, very drowsily, to count the stones 
which lay on his green plate. 

"This year, next year, sometime, never, 
this year — next year — sometime — never — 
this year . . . next . . ." 

The Philosopher had fallen asleep in the 
sun. — fan Strutter in "Appeal to Reason/' 



SILK HOSIERY AND UNEMPLOY- 
MENT 



Following its announcement that 5J3S,- 
000 persons were out of employment and 
supplying the figures apparently to justify 
the statement, the Department of Labor 
is now busy trying to explain that there 
cannot possibly be that many persons out 
of work, principally because some persons 
employed during the war in war work 
and now without an occupation could not 
be properly classified as persons subject 
to employment. Secretary Davis also finds 
consolation in the statement that there 
are 12,000,000 who are still at work. 

As an evidence that the unemployed are 
being absorbed by industry, he says : 

"But one must have his head very 
much in the air these days not to notice 
the growing prevalence of silk hosiery and 
the use of silks in general." 

The fact remains that idle men are- 
offering to sell themselves into employ- 
ment for board and lodging as slaves were 
sold on the auction block while others are 
being chased from the benches in public 
parks which they had preempted as beds. 

The flippant remark of the Secretary 
about the prevalence of silk hosiery could 
not have been inspired by these pathetic 
scenes. 

The business of the Department of 
Labor is to give facts and figures con- 
cerning employment and unemployment 
without exaggeration and certainly not 
to confuse the public with explanations 
or even apologies that have no relevancy 
to actual conditions. 

Everyone is desirous of relieving de- 
plorable unemployment conditions and the 
best way to do so is first to know the 
actual facts and then face them courage- 
ously and sensibly. 

A Department of Labor that guesses at 
or juggles statistics relating to labor or 
attempts to conceal the facts is worse 
than useless, and is obstructive to proper 
remedial measures. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 5) 



used against others where the plaintiff 
has recourse to the law of the land. 

With strikers, however, the injunction 
judge, in the language of Judge Griffiths, 
"supersedes the ordinary law of the land." 



Officials are Czars 

At Madisonville, Ky., the sedition or 
syndicalist law was condemned by the 
annual convention of the State Federation 
of Labor. This bill was passed when the 
people were led to believe that our 
national institutions were endangered sev- 
eral months ago. One feature of the law- 
provides that any town marshal or con- 
stable may stop a public speaker for state- 
ments that the town marshal believes may 
lead to unrest. 

Under this law a trade unionist cannot 
speak on the evils of child labor in sec- 
tions of the State where this labor is 
employed. 

When Governor Morrow signed the bill 
he questioned its legality. Since then he 
has publicly and privately favored its 
repeal. 



Attend your Union meetings. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WASHINGTON LETTER 



(By Laurence Todd) 



President Harding and his commercial 
adviser. Herbert Hoover; stood up before 
their hand-picked conference on unemploy- 
ment and asked the many big employers 
and the few trade representatives and 
the professional people who comprise this 
body to relieve the Federal treasury from 
any responsibility to the unemployed. Mr. 
Harding and Mr. Hoover are opposed to 
paternalism, they say; all they ask is that 
business resume and that the men and 
women of labor go baek to work. 
To Apply the Ether 

Nol a word of credit which will enable 
farmers and small business men to pa) 
wages. Xot a word about Federal legisla- 
tion which would place taxation on the 
estates and fortunes and big incomes, and 
remove it from the masses. Nothing but 
a demand that the conference find a way 
to keep the unemployed within bounds, 
and get them baek in some mysterious 
manner not specified — to earning more 
profits for business. 

Hoover has added fourteen names to 
his original thirty-eight, chosen to solve 
the problem of the unemployed. Half a 
dozen of them were labor or pro-labor 
spokesmen, but the class character of the 
affair was again exhibited in the commit- 
tee on organization and program, named 
by Hoover after consulting briefly with 
Secretary of Labor Davis. In that com- 
mittee of ten persons, Matthew Woll was 
the only union spokesman. It included 
Schwab of Bethlehem Steel. Woolley of 
American Radiator. Julius Barnes of the 
grain trust, Markham of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad. O'Connor . »f the Shipping 
Board and Couzens of the Ford Motor 
Company. 

Plutes Are Nervous 

Frank confession of alarm at the pros- 
pect for the coming winter was made by 
Hoover in his appeal for concerted action 
to relieve the distress of the job 

"This period of depression," he said, 
"has been continuous sjnee the fall of last 
year, but our working population was able 
to carry over during the past year upon 
its savings. There can be no question that 
we are on the up-grade, but economic 
progress cannot under any expectation 
come with sufficient rapidity to pn 
much unemployment and bitter suffering 
over the forthcoming winter. Great num- 
bers will have exhausted their savings, and 
must be subjects of great concern to the 
entire public. 

"There is no economic failure so terri- 
ble in its import as that of a country pos- 
sessing a surplus of every necessity ol 
life in which numbers, willing and anxious 
to work, are deprived of these necessities. 
It simply cannot be, if our moral and eco 
nomic system is to survive. 

"It is the duty of this conference to 
find definite and organized remedy for this 
emergency, and I hope that you may lie 
able to outline for public consideration 
such plans as will in the long view tend 
lo mitigate its recurrence." 

Would Appease Temporarily 

Observe that Mr. Hoover does not say 
that the "surplus of every necessity of 
life" which he finds on hand, should be 



ed around to those "willing and anx- 
ious to work," in order to redeem the fail- 
ure of the moral and economic system. 
Not at all. He simply wants the suffering 
mitigated — not abolished or prevented by 
fundamental changes in the system which 
has broken down. And he settles all 
doubts as to his purpose by saying that 
"We need a consideration of what meas- 
ures must be taken to restore our com- 
merce and employment to normal." 

President Harding completed this mar- 
velous thought by saving that he was in- 
formed that the United States has 1.500,- 
000 unemployed even in prosperous years, 
and that the problem just now is oik of 

reducing the proportion of the unemployed 

to normal. He. therefore, warned the 
e that it was not called to deal 
with the underlying social problems, but 
merely with the present emergency. 
History Might Repeat Again 
It all sounded very much like a chapter 
from some history of the last days of the 
bourbon Grand Monarchy in France, 
when the royal treasury was empty, the 
people starving, the court at its merriest 
height of extravagance and indifference, 
and the ministers of the king groping 
about for means to keep the social edifice 
a few months longer on its rotted founda- 
tions. Misery was normal; the ministers 
were not concerned with normal misery, 
but only with some incidental outbreak of 
misery which affected the royal treasury 
or the royal peace of mind. They were 
sorry for the peasants, but the peasants 
must not begin to discuss their own 
wrongs. 

Another Element Pressing 

In a little room at the second-rate hotel, 
half a mile away from the conference, 
Urbain Ledoux, the man who has drama- 
tized unemployment by his "slave market" 
on Boston Common and by his feeding of 
the jobless in New York City, law sick, 
impatient to be up and at his work in 
behalf of these victims of economic col- 
lapse. 

Ledoux was suffering from a cold on his 
lungs, because he had been out for i]yr 
hours in a rainstorm in New York on 
Sunday night, feeding one thousand men. 
providing them with lodgings and street- 
car tickets, and leading them in a great 
singing meeting before the} went to bed 
and he took a train for Washington. But 
the tremendous strength of the man — his 
personal magnetism which reminds one 
of Bryan of twenty years ago, or of Elbert 
Hubbard of the same period, plus a mys- 
tical quality all his own — shows through a 
mere sickness, and promises to make his 
dealings with the White House almost as 
memorable as those of the militant suffra- 
gists with that cold citadel of power. 

Determined in the Course 

"I have come to Washington to appeal 
to the President to publish the name- "i 
those who profited to the extent of more 
than 100 per cent during the war," he 
said, "that they may share fifty-fifty with 
the unemployed, who have not profited at 
all. and that the other 50 per cent be used 
under Government supervision for works 
of constructive welfare. 

"I will consistently insist that the list 
he published, so that the searchlight of 
public opinion may lie focused upon it, 



with the expectation that ultimately tin- 
hearts of these people may be melted ami 
that they will voluntarily contribtue 50 
per cent to the >ocial reconstruction in the 
aftermath of the war. 

"If the President refuses to see me, I 
shall wait until he does see me. If the 
publication of these names is not made 
! will wait and mobilize public opin- 
ion until it is accomplished, even if it 
takes a vear. But it will be done. There 
is a force that cannot be withstood. If 
men's hearts are not melted, then fear of 
public opinion will move them." 

Ledoux. if he lives, will become a nota- 
ble personal factor in the United Sta 
in the labor struggle. He has purpose and 
power of a rare kind, and his purpose to 
move President Harding and the profiteer- 
is set as a test of his judgment. He prom- 
ises not merely to visit the White House, 
but to visit the Hoover conference also. 
To each place he proposes to take "a hun- 
dred men — the human documents of the 
[or relief for the unemployed." He 
comes with the formal endorsement of 
the organizations of the unemployed and 
their friends in Boston, New York, Phila- 
delphia and Baltimore, and backed by the 
purse of one of his first converts, a son of 
the late Senator Brice of Ohio. 

To Watch Disarmament Conference 

While the unemployment issue has been 
before the Cabinet and the publicists and 
the workers, this past week, some atten- 
tion has rdso been given the progress of 
plans for limiting of national armaments. 
President Gompers of the A. F. of L. sent 
out a cablegram to the labor movements 
of Britain, France, Italy and Japan, ask- 
ing them to follow the example of the 
Federation in holding big demonstrations 
on November 11 in favor of the fullest 
possible degree of disarmament, through 
the Washington conference. 

William H. Johnston, president of the 
International Association of Machinists, 
took part in a conference here of liberal 
organizations and churches interested in 
disarmament during the week. At the 
same time Mr. Gompers' nfhev gave out 
statements of the acceptance of invitations 
issued t" some 125 labor officials and 75 
other citizens by him. to form an Advisory 
Disarmament Committee, which will meet 
here on Armistice Lav and will maintain 
a permanent office and committee here to 
watch and report publicly upon the de 
velopmcnt of the official conference. 

The National Popular Government 
League, likewise, is going to assist in 
keeping the people of the country in touch 
with the real activities of the diplomats 
and generals and admirals who will meet 
here to bolster up their own safety under 
i guise of "settlement" of bar Eastern prob- 
lems and limitation of armaments. 

The most remarkable thing about this 
Harding conference on armament is the 
almost universal suspicion in which it is 
held. Versailles and the betrayal of the 
Fourteen Points is too recent a memory. 
Nobody seems to think it on the square. 
Two OUt of three observers express the 
opinion that it will blow up. due to the 
introduction in the game of too many 
gummed cards. 

Gompers, Johnston and the rest of the 
labor observers are getting ready to show- 
it up, each in his own way. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



LABOR SECRETARY WOULD 
ESTABLISH SPY SYSTEM 



Employers west of the Mississippi river 
have succeeded in cutting their payrolls 
practically in half, according' to an esti- 
niade made by the United States Depart- 
ment of Labor. 

This explains why disastrous economic 
conditions exist in that section. The pur- 
chasing power of workers has been so 
curtailed that they are able to buy only 
the bare necessities, and in thousands of 
instances even less than their imperative 
needs. 

The steel industry has effected the 
biggest labor saving- of any industry, ac- 
cording to the reports. In one group of 
steel mills the payroll total was reduced 
from more than $13,000,000 for a given 
period to about $3,000,000.' These plants, 
of course, are unorganized, the workers 
being helpless in the face of frequent wage 
cuts and "readjustments" that compel 
them to produce more for less. 

This report is illuminating in that it 
states, with official sanction, that the 
average salary of the industrial worker 
now ranges about $3 a day. Before re- 
adjustment the average wage was in ex- 
cess of $5 a day. 

Cost of Living Climbs Upward 

Compilations recently made by the De- 
partment of Labor stated that the cost 
of living, which at one time showed a 
tendency of returning to something near 
the pre-war level, was checked in its 
downward course and since has been 
slowly but surely returning to the high 
peak of profiteering prices. 

The $3 per day wage that is established 
as the average is just about half the sum 
. declared by the Department of Labor and 
other agencies as necessary to keep the 
worker and his family at the bare sub- 
sistence level. The lowest family budget — 
worked out by the employers themselves — 
puts the irreducible minimum at which 
the American worker can secure for him- 
self and dependents a "fodder" living at 
about $1,700. The prevailing average daily 
wage is more than $700 under this esti- 
mate. 

Here and there, the statement says, 
.some workers are still receiving wages of 
from $8 to $10 a day on contracts made 
during the war period and after. These 
exceptions increase the average daily rate, 
thus proving that many workers are get- 
ting much less than $3 and are, conse- 
quently, that much nearer actual priva- 
tion. 

The average monthly pay envelope of 
the Nation is said to contain between 
$0,000,000 and $1,000,000,000. A year 
ago the average was $2,000,000,000. This 
means that, with existing high prices, the 
Nation's best customers are able to con- 
sume a trifle more than half of what they 
were consuming twelve months ago. 
Fears Revolt by Workers 

The Department of Labor has an idea 
that the process of "deflation" has gone 
so far that the workers are certain to 
revolt and it is asking, through Secre- 
tary Davis, for an appropriation of $500,- 
000 to extend the work of its conciliation 
and mediation bureau. The bureau now 
is operating on an appropriation of 
$100,000. 

Davis has informed the President that 



if his recpicst is granted he will be able 
to prevent many strikes and lockouts, 
thus saving business from losses, and in 
turn increasing the Nation's income 
through profits taxes. 

Seventy-five per cent of the cases re- 
ferred to the department are adjusted 
without stoppage of work, the records 
disclose. Secretary Davis believes that if 
he is permitted to employ key men for 
each industry and a sufficient number of 
assistants he will be able to keep the 
peace. 

When this plan was first advanced it 
had some sinister aspects that were dis- 
quieting to workers. As then stated by 
Labor, it was the Secretary's plan to 
establish an espionage system in the large 
industrials. Federal agents were to work 
among producers, find out what they 
were talking about and report to the 
Labor Department. 

Replacing Private Detectives 

It was argued by Davis that this would 
enable the Government to intervene before 
plans had matured to the point where a 
strike or lockout might be unavoidable. 

Davis at the time said that employers 
maintained "under-cover" men for this 
exact purpose, and that if the Government 
established its super-spy system the pri- 
vate detectives would be unnecessary. 

The workers, according to the Labor 
Department, are apprehensive that there 
would be "leaks" that would seriously 
jeopardize their interests. Government 
agents would he in much better position 
than private operators to gather informa- 
tion that would be useful to employers, 
and experience has taught the workers 
that it is not impossible to corrupt official 
agencies and turn them into instrumentali- 
ties for increasing their sufferings. — Labor. 



TRADE UNIONISM GROWS 



The international labor office of the 
league of nations announces that trade 
unions in the various countries has in- 
creased from 16,152.000 in 1913 to 48.029,- 
000 in 1920. 

No figures are issued for India in 1913, 
but the 1920 reports show a trade union 
membership of 500,000. In Japan no fig- 
ures are issued for 1913, but in 1920 the 
report is 500,000. The United Kingdom 
increased from 4,173,000 to 8,024,000; Italy, 
from 972,000 to 3.100,000; South Africa, 
from 5000 to 60,000; Germany, from 4,513,- 
000 to 13.000.000, and Switzerland, from 
95,000 to 292,000. Every other country re- 
ports similar gains. 

NATIONS SPENDING MILLIONS 
ON ARMS 



London. — Great Britain's present ex- 
penditure on armaments is 460 per cent 
above the figures for the year 1913-14. 
America's expenditure has increased by 
190 per cent, France's by 600 per cent. 
The money being spent on battleships 
this year would suffice to build 40,000 
houses. But, according to the Govern- 
ment, we cannot afford such a luxury 
as houses ! 



Children enjoying the benefit of school 
and the pleasure of the playground in- 
stead of the drudgery of the mill and 
factory is part of the progress made by 
the union label. 



|IIIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIU!IIIIIIIIIIIIIII1 Illil Illlllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ItllllllllUl 

I International Seamen's Union 1 

| 'oi:' Anvorka 

Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIII!III!IM!III1!IIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIW 

LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAK 

Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark 

K. B. NOLAN, Secretary 
THOS. A. HANSON. Treasurer 
Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. "i GEORGE HANSEN, 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN. 

1501 Columbus Road 

MILWAUKEE, Wis CHAS. BRADHERING, 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich WM, DONNELLY. 

410 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR. O J. W. ELLISON, 

74 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

CONNEAUT, O 

992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio S. R. DYE, 

618 Front Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ni 

3308 East Ninety-second Street 

SUPERIOR, Wis WM. EDGEWORTH, 

724 Tower Avenue 



ES 

Street 

Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
Agent 
.Agent 
-Agent 
Agent 
.Agent 
Agent 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTEN DERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO. N. Y 71 Main Street 

THOS. CONWAY. Secretary 

ED. HICKS, Treasurer 

Phone Seneca 48 

CLEVELAND, 819 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE. Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich 410 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 35 West Eagle Street 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 
Telephone Seneca 896 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE. Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 69 CKy Street 

VANCOUVER. B. C P. O. Box 671 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box (t 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box «T 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 114 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 1016 First Avenue, South 

P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore Room 21, Ainsworth Building 

SAN PEDRO. Cal 613 Beacon St.. P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 86 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203. Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTI.AND, Ore 68 Third Street 

SAN PEDRO. Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 41 

ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box III 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1675 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box III 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2206 
STOCKTON, Cal Labor Temple 



FISH TRAP PILE DRIVERS AND WEB WORKERS 

OF PUGET SOUND AND ALASKA 

1315 Dock Street, Bellingham, Washington 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 






Mews 



Electrical <• ' : land, 

ign emcnt with 
trical Workers' 1'iiion \ 
men will be paid $9 a day; 
and helpi 
The < lonvention of the I i 
Mine \\ i 

oved proposed salary incn 
for the offici 

Internal rht-hour day, with 

a ha Saturday, was adi 

h\ the United Association of Plumb- 

nd allied trades at tl 
day <>f the held 

nee. 
( Irgani: miners achieved 

the numerical strength in 

history of their union during 
the r, despiti I in- 

dustrial depression and widespread 
unemployment in the coal 

hun- 
dred thousand me 

Nearly one hundred indictments 
at Madison, \\ . Y.i.. 

last week, by the B iunty 

rand Jury investigatin 
march of armed men recentlj 
OUnty, toward I 
with thi on of 

ling Mingo County. The Grand 
will continue its investigation. 
With a membership of 1<><> and 
without ■ 3, Bridge and Struc- 

tural Workers. R 

Movers' Union No. 1. has Keen or- 
zed at San Francisco from 
nig members of the old Bridge 
and Structural Iron V. ! fnion 

No. 31, whii I ly surren 

its charter to the international union. 
Daniel J. Tobin, nt of the 

International Brotherhi i earn- 

to the A. I'\ of L. being represented 
he Washington unemployment 

from 
much talk in Washin 
re has h. much running 

I .abor I 
too much kowtowing to an Admin- 
istration that is unfriendly to lal 
New York's first bread line s 
before the World War is in o] 

at the Church of St. Mark in 

Bouerie. It was opened last 

week. About six hundred men. 

many of whom raced from the 

lies in B 
in li on the first day. 

in the 
chapel, and about one hundred and 
tly. 
All the coal mines of the Kai 

• ere idle i I, on ac- 

appearance of Ai 

II ow at and AugUSl Do 

the 

Kansas Miner's Unio 

\ months 
lil for cal rike last h'eli- 

II und niners wi i 

ptember 
ir chiefs, who are deter- 
mine • nee rather 

than >as Indus- 

trial Court. 

Several thousand longshori 
and checkers walked out at 
Yorl er 1, in • 

rking tern ' upon re- 

cently by trans-Atlantic . steamship 
id the International 
I .on s Assi iciation. The 

rict council of tl 
I .ongshoremen's A an- 

nounced that it had not autho 

rhi ment, 

drawn up last v provided for 

her 1. The walkout took place 
both the Manhattan and 
: waterfronts. 



Office Phone Main 2666 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Tinier a rule adopted by the Seattle 

■Hi e. letters- nrlilressed in care of 

illore' Inion Agency at Seattle can 

nut be held longer than 30 days from 

.f delivery. If members are unable 

ill or have their mail forwaded 

t period, they should notify 

t to hold mail until arrived. 

Asten, Geo. W. 

en, C. B. K'oeli. 1 1, 'linan 

, Oscar Kouistra, Sam 
■ i. A. M. Nils 

Anderson, H. Kearney, Hush 

on, A. C. Kuhlmai 

;. B. Kereher, vl 

John Krakila, Alfred 

tj, O. A. Kane, C. 

m, Albert Kretchman, 

Anderson, Andrew Kolodze, Geo. 

ill, W. C. Kelly. A. J. 

Ackerman, Anton Kother, il. 

Anderson, S. M. Karlson, K. 
Arstad, B. 

I. nine, John 

O. W. Law, II. C. 

Blackman, Arthur Lesklnen, John 

: II. Lysl 

Behring, C. Lovendal, Pe 

r. Lund, Hjalmar 

Barry, Wm. Lesktnen, Yrja. 

m, A. G. John 

Bungess, J. W. Lambert, Edgar 

Wm. Lundmerh, Gista 

ink. E. T. Lokken, I >. 

n, K. C. 
Belmont, Joe '"hn 

Hloingren, A. Lindengrem, Otto 

\. (package) Lindekranz, O. 

I'.. llah. I.eo Line. Theodi 

j.\ Lincoln, H. A. 

nun. R. M. Lowendal, P. 
ii. F. A. 

ill, G. W. 

Christensen, Aug. Mikkelsen, K. -1620 
Calmark, B 

mes McDonnell, M. 

n, Harold Moherg, A If. 

' ell, Ami" r, F. M. 

Caldwell Meza, Tose 

Carr, I Mattson, Olaf 

Coumes, John E. Magnusen. Nils 

m, Wm. 

Campbell, C. on, Emil 

er, L. C. Nli as. 

Carlson. Rudolf Neve. J. 

Olrlson. CI NieU 1'. 
Nelson, D. ,T. 

10. R. Nerse, a. 

Overland Krik Nerberg, J. E. 

,il J, w. Nielsen, N. C. -1224 
Nyman. 1 

Erikeon, M. Ness, H. 

Erlkson, John on, A. B. 
Brickson, Eddie 

nto, J. E. ' »lsen, C. -1 112 

Eokholm, B. Olsen, Jens 

Elze, «'arl ' J. 

Edwards, John o, M. 
Erlcksen, Nils 

irge 

itng, M. ''iris 

i i'i lonnor, B. T.. 

Gordon, Arthur Olsen, P. -1005 

Gran Joch [erman 

Olsen, i 

Gundersen, J. Olsen, Christoffer 

in. Thos. Ohm, 11. 

Griffiths, Ben Olsson, Julius 

i .han H. 
ii. Ingvald 

Frank Petersen, C. 

B, a. Petersi n 

n P. Petersen, I 

on, Jim Peterson, Jaan 

Harris, F. Pivoch, John 

■ He sen, Ole 

Halstead, John Petterson, TF.-2268 

Huber, Chas. L. Pearson, John 

Handi, W. m John 

Hammond. Allen Peterson, A. II. 
Huoalin, Remington Pedersen, I 

t. II. E. Petersen, Bjarrn 

trtln Pedersen, P. C. 

Hansen. H. P. 

g, C. Quandt, A. 

Hansen, John 

i. W. O. 
i Isen, Arthur H A. 

a, E II. 
Jonsson, Per Emil Reyes, M. C. 

G. A. Rasmussen, T. C. 

in, Osear Rod, T. 

ii. I rans is, Frank 

on, Hjalmar 
en, Andrew 

en, Alex Rodgere, Jaek 

,i, Carl ' James 

A. TT. Rlvaul, John 

i P. 
Vdolf Slmmonds, John 

Johns. Btenberg, Hjalmar 
i'i ed. Solburg. Chas. 

Skog, Otto 
Kaho, II. L. 1 1 in. in. C. S. 

Karlson, G. A. -1190Saro, H. 

Arthur Stiffler, R. 

Kill, Andrew Sater, P. P. 

Kelly, P. J. Slattery, H. 



Isen, H. Undelstvedt, li. C. 

Swanson, Albert 

□son, Geo. Wilson, Robert 

in, Kills WU 

en, Oscar Wldell, w. 

Wilson. E. W. 
Swensen, Ruben Wilson, T. 

Sabro, R. W. Ware, T. 

Shappe, E. M. Wald, P. 

Si n Wald, J. 

Sparre, Pal Whitecross, James 

S loldenburg, P. White, B. 

es White, ('has. 
man, E. on, .1. V. 

Wennerstin, a. 
Thuchlnsky, Theod. Williams, W. 
G ' 
i, Arvid Joe 

Thacker, C. J. Tlonea, B. 

Tonning, iluislofferJurnoff, Harris 

t g. Axel 
Takkes, J. Zlmera, George 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Alaska Fishermen's Letter List. 



Alaska Fishermen 

Letter List 
A ml rev. A. Bell 
Anderson, Olaf 
Ole 
Brumfllt, Walter 

-. Chas. 
Brown, George A 
Carlson. Eddy 
D. 

n, E. 
Carisen, Ernest 

Bruce 
Dentril, Salvatore 

1 lalin. August 
on, John 

Pli m. Knnt 

ii, R. J. 
s, Jaek 
i>rg, Gust. 

Janssen, N. M. 



Karlkremoll, Bteve 
Larsen, Theodore A. 
Lidoroff, N. 
Muiler, Angie 
Nordbli m. 1 ti ti. 
Ni son. ( iscar 

Ben. 
Olsen, Oscar J. 

Etoni, E. 

ick 

Rath. Herman 
Smith, R. 
Skooba, Nils 

Iter, Paul 
Registered Mail 
Mlttemeyer, John 
I I 
mussen, Peter 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, K. F. 

Anderson, Olaf 
-1118 

Anderson, John C. 

Anderson, Charlie 

Alhers, George 

Barton. M. 
| Bohm, Aug. 

Carman, P. 
, Fostervold, Kasper 

Gustafson. J. 

Harris, John T. 

Mnlmberg, Trans. 

Johannessen, Alf. 

Johannessen. Jonas 

Jackson, John 

Jesperson. Martin 

Lepp, Alex. 

Lalsel, Harry 

Nielson, Chr. 

Nielsen, Hans 



Newington, Fred 
Olsson, CI - 
Pedersen, Wilhelm 
Peterson, John 
Parker. Arthur 
Rengsderf, W. 
Rawley, Bruce 
Rubens, Chas. 
Randle. C. W. 
Saro, W. 
Smith, C. Johan 
Smith, Fred 
Smith, Emil 
Schant. H. 
Tonsfeldt, John 
Torjesen, Ounwald 
Vejvada, Frank 
Vetters, Oscar 
Westerberg, Carl 
Wilenlus, J. T. 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Andersen, John 
Dominguez, Joseph 
Jarvlnen, Oscar 
Klingenberg, John 
Low, G. 
Matson, P. 
Marvis, John T. 
Nelson, Andrew B. 



dorf, W. 
Robinson, L. 

one, W. P. 
Landberg, John 
Skullv. John 
Smith, John 
Smith. Carl J. 
Tomphson, 'l'. 



Honolulu Letter List. 



Johan 
l.aulier. Emil 

I ee, Robt. 
Kaht, l let 

■ . Carl W. 



Tjeraland, E 

Shaw. I i. 

Springman, W. 1 1. 
Willa i dsen, W, 

Weinman, John 



INFORMATION WANTED 



James Kenney of Philadelphia, last 
seen in Pennarth, Wales, is inquired 
for by V. McMalion, 96 Plain street, 
Providence, R. I. 6-1-21 



Mrs. Hattie McClellan, 510 James 
Street, Seattle, Washington, is desir- 
ous of locating her son, George L. 
McClellan, age 21; last heard from 
about year ago in Norfolk, Va. 
3-9-21 



Ole Toreson, born in Trondhjem, 
Norway, age about 30. His cousin, 
Tryggve Hagen, would like to hear 
from him. Address, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



DENTIST 

Hours: 9 a. m. to o:30 p. m. 

EUGENE PAYNE, M.D., D.D.S. 

At 3 Fourth St. Mezzanine Floor 

California Theatre Building 
Market St. Corner Fourth St. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1— Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1890 
MENS CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS 

and FURNISHING GOODS 
108-110 Main Street, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street • Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



UNION LABEL 
SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

NYMAN BROS. 

Bee Hive Store 

Men's Furnishings, Hickory Shirts. 

Hats, Oil Clothing. 

Home of the Union Made 

Co-operative Shoe. 

302 So. F Street, ABERDEEN. Wash. 

on the Water Front. 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Sueeessor to CHUIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN. WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH, 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone, knowing the whereabouts 
of Anders Teodor Turesson, born at 
Gothenburg, will please notify The 
Swedish Firemen's Union, Gothen 
burg 7, Sweden. 11-24-20 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Alfred ien, Adolf Lueder, Win. 

A ndei sen, J. N. Lund, i ilai 

Aspe, Teodor Lindholm, Chas. 

\llii. John. -1349 Liindroos, (Isk'ir 
Alberteen, J. Lill, Karl 

Anderson, Chas. A. Lodersen, John 
Anderson, Charley Lehan, C. 
IT. Larsen, Olaf J. 

son, A. G. B. Larsoi 
Vndreassen, Hans Lm.lalm, \lfred 
Anderson, B. A. Larsen, C S. 
Anderson, Harold M. Loven, C. 
Anderson, H. M. Ligovski, .Too 

-14115 Lorenzen, Jean 

Andersson, Oust B Laursen, Max O. 
Anderson, Harry B. Lauritzen H. M. 
Anderson, Chas. A. Lobelos, .Tose 
Anderson, H. M. Luhrs, Ludvig 
Anderson, Sam T.epp, Alex 

Lamon, Arne 
in, Jacob 

lund, Erik McCormick H. 

I, W. P. McMullen, Dan 

'•en, Bert McCard, Albert 

Broman, Karl McNash, J. 

Ball, Hans McVay, Frank 

Mr-r'rid<\ George 
e, William Melaa. Pedor 

John J. Martin. Charles 

Crawford, Thomas Muller Frederik 

en, Hick Mathisen, N. -1296 

Carr, R. W. Monsen. EJd 

Cameron, Robert Mize. J. H. 
Cumalet, John H. Mattson, Maurice 
Christian, Jim McCloskey, W. 

i Mementsen. Alfred 

- a, John Neville, Thomas 

id, HoraceNystrom, Uno 
Carr, Robert R. Nielson, S. 

Calcoff, Sam Nelsen, B. C. 

hi, Thomas Nelson, Charlie 
Checkan, W. 

1 i.i ■on. Axel G. Olsen, Stephen 
r, Alvin Olsen. Henning 

Ossante, Anthony 
Dyrland, Brik O'Donnell Jas. 

■ ' e?-. Jack Olsson, P. 

enham. Harry Olsen, Harold 

Daunt, C. Ovist. John 

Olsen, Arne 
Eliassen, Emil Olsen, Ferdinand 

Rvenson, Alex Olsen, Heman -1340 

! -ns, John Olsen, B. F. -1280 

ESricksson, Julius 
Bliasson, George Perdok, H. 

Evertsen, Olaf Petersen. W. 

i on, Geo. Persson, Bernhard 

Bscalante, J. E. Petterson, Axel 

Peterson, O. E. 
Forsberg, Alfred -15B8 

Fritze, Harry Pakkola, H. 

i' mi'/. Chas. Pastorillan, M. 

Fallbom, John A. Pruzon. William 
Fugman, Arthur 

Rudowitz, Henry 
Gn . rsen, K. Rogers, Arthur 

Gray A. Rhodes, Bruce 

Gunnerud, Thor Ruygrok, Dick 

on. .Tohan Rostum, Harry 
(iolz. Rudolf Runge, Robert 

Gaide, Wm. . Runska, Henry 

Rokow, Steve 
Hansen, Harold Rengsdorf, W. 

1 1 inlon, William Romand, Gaetano 
rlai ev Earl S. Rogers, Roberl G. 

Hill, Chas. Richardsen, E. 

lb, Hon, Geo. A. 

Hellman, Max Smith. Albert 

Hickey, John Sandbach, George 

Hall, RobertE. Stewart. Elder 

Horner, Ambrose Sandberg, N. A. 
n iave, Norval Sorensen, Edwin 

i fogi tedt, Chas. Sanders, ("has 

n, Berger Sutert. Ole 

it, John -2905Stenberg, All. 
Heino A Sehellhouse. \\ . 

Hunter, Ernest Sandblom H. 

Harwardt, Evold Samuelsen. H. M. 

Shaw. G. S. 

Isaak, John S. Schierenbeck. K. 

3 en, W. Shaffer, Ray W. 

Sundquist, Walter 
Jansson, John A. Seller, Robert 
Johansen, J. -1432 Schulz, Louis 

i s, Arne M. Schmidt, H. T. 1.. 

on George Seamen, Fred 
Johansen, Ed. -2240Sandstrom, Hjalmar 
Jomo, John Sunde. O. • 

Jorgensen, Knud Svendsen, Getorge E. 
Johnson, James 

Jackson, F. Thompson, M. 

Jensen, Marius Thompson. Maurice 

Johansen, Carl Thomas, Fred 

.son, A. Tvete, Roy L. 

Johnson, Clarence 

A. Verney, A. 

Jorgensen, J. Vizcarra, O. 

Johnson, Tom 

Janson, John R. Williams. Terrell 

Johansen, John E. Werner. Ch. J. 
Johnson, Oscar Wilson, John 

Johnson, C. A. Williams. Frank 

en, Fred Wright, Charlie 

Johansen, .Tohan Wilhclm. Eduard 
Johannsson, Albert Woide, John 

ensen, Jens G.Wilhelmson, Karl 
Jonassen, Johannes Winkelman. Otto 
sen, Paul Wennerquist, Anton 

a, Krislian Werner, Chas. 
Jacobsen, Tom Wall, George 

Johanson, J. E. 

-2873 Young, Carl 

Janson, Jack R. Young, William 

Krause, Arthur Zimera, George 

itz, Oscar Zetbury, Harold 
Knudsen, Andrew 

Koski, Juho PACKAGES 

Buckens, B. Haines. Han, 1.1 

ni, a, h, Hugo Stevenson, Roberl 
McVay, Frank 
l.ii. e. Paul Brast, K. 



Old Reliable and Up-to-Date 

TOM WILLIAMS 

EXCLUSIVE TAILOR 
FOR MEN 

28 Sacramento Street 

Phone Douglas 48 7 4 



Seamen! Have You Got a Copy of Axtell's 

Book, "Rights and Duties of Merchant 

Seamen"? 

It contains a digest of the maritime and statutory law which any seaman 
can understand. 

It is an education as to your rights as well as your duties. It will protect 
you wherever you are. It deals fully with the subject of wages, breach of 
contract of hiring, salvage, personal injury, maintenance, consul's duties 
an. I powers, authority of the master and officers and duty of the seamen 
to the ship and master; digest of your rights under the Constitution of 
the United Slates. Enclose a dollar in an envelope and we will mail you 
a copy. Reduced rates in quantities. 

RIGHTS & DUTIES PUBLISHING CO. 

9 State St. Iver Olbers, A. B., Sales Manager New York City 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiuii mil 



V/orld's 'Workers 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 



Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 
Peaceful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
Disputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman- 
ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Dealers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole, Insole or Lining. 




BOOT & SHOE WORKERS* UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COLLIS LOVELY, General President CHARLES L. BAINE, General S<*reUry-Treanr« 



1 la i. ii ip, Axel J. 
Harwardt, Ewald 
l lavis, Orville 
McCormick, Harold 
I bniiiiiii. Christ 
Campbell, J. R. 
i ilsen, Herman 
Costley, F. L. 
Johansen, N. A. 
i ifrerdal, Ing 
Nelsen, Steve -1449 
Larson, Carl 
Hansen, <>. -2171 
Baxter, T. A., -2351 
i Usson, Nels., -1710 
Keller, Robert -164S 
Vasilopolis, S. -476 
Rod, Sakarias -1172 
Johansen. J. V. -282 
Jacobsen, Jacob -19 



Pedersen, Lars -1411 
Albertsen, Harry 

-2436 
Benbow, Chas. L. 

-3111 
Schmidt, H. C. -3619 
K;n lane, J. -1628 
Smith. EdW. G. 

-3939 
Shurm, C. B. -3884 
Powell, P. .1008 
Gudmundsi n J 
Williams, A. -1707 
Rich, B. II. E. G. 

-1570 
Moller, L. T. A. 

-1894 
Ecklin, Carl -1240 
gGelbke, n 
8Heggum, A. -3453 



"Cold Spring vs. Lycoming," "Be- 
noni vs. West Hargrave," "West 
■uiver vs. Ozaukee." S. B. Ax- 
tell, 9 State St., New York City. 



Frank Hines, John Ryan and 
Harold Wood, who claim to have 
been forced off the SS. "West Que- 
chee" in France, December 14, 1919, 
please report or communicate with 
me at once. S. B. Axtell, Nine State 
street. New York. 4-20-21 



INFORMATION WANTED 



I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crews of the follow- 
ing vessels. In most cases, action 
has been commenced. In some cases 
the funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney with 
me. "Anacortes vs. Barge 95," 
"Alabama vs. Brandywine," "Bell 
Haven vs. Riverside Bridge," "Bak- 
ersfield vs. Eastern Sailor," "Beau- ] 
mont vs. Baladan," "Chester Valley 
vs. Campbello," "Cacique vs. Carta- 
gena," "Dachet vs. Hutchinson," 
"Delavan vs. Pennsylvanian," "Delana 
vs. Nevasco," "Devolente vs. Winova 
County," "Elkton vs. Cold Spring," 
"Eastern Glen vs. Andrew Jackson," 
"Silverado vs. Lake Faristan," "East 
Indian vs. Lake Flag," "Eastern 
Shore vs. Boston Bridge," "Eastside 
vs. Volunteer," "Eastern Sun vs. 
Jekylc," "Federal vs. Monamac," 
"Gypson Prince vs. Queen Makon- 
ing," "Glenwhite vs. Wathena," "H. 
F. Morse vs. Capulan," "Hadnot vs. 
Allentown," "Hickman vs. Faraby," 
"Intan vs. Putnam," "Ida vs. West 
Hepburn," "Lake Strabo vs. Lake 
Franconia," "Louisiana vs. Tallac," 
"Lake Freezeout vs. Liberty," 
"Mcsholee vs. Johnson City," 
"Moosehausic vs. Jene L. Summer- 
ville," "Monasses vs. Eastern Queen," 
"New Briton vs. Braebrum, "Orcus 
vs. Johnson City," "Pawlet vs. Yana," 
"Pratt vs. Irish," "Shannock vs. 
Devo," "Sacanac vs. War Hagara," 
"Sutransco vs. Swedco," "Tollard vs. 
Gunston Hall," "Quabbin vs. Far- 
nam," "Tunica vs. Neponier," "West 
Katan vs. Flavel," "West Harcouver 
vs. West Hemmetite," "Western 
Hope vs. Impico," "Western Comet 
vs. Nordica," "Western Queen vs. 
Ciipple Creek," "Westford vs. Osha- 
loosa and Osakis," "West Segovia 
vs. Wampum," "Western Comet vs. 
Nesco," "Western Pride vs. West 
Silkirk," "West Maximus vs. Moose- 
hausic," "Western "Front vs. Silver 
Queen," "Wonahbe vs. Consort," 



Mrs. Theresa Moran, 313 Rich- 
mond street. Providence. R. I., is 
anxious to ascertain the where- 
abouts of her brother, Dan Gillis, a 
member of the Firemen's Union, last 
heard of in Ashtabula, Ohio, about 
four years ago. Any information 
will be greatly appreciated. 4-27-21 



Carl Tossavainen, a former mem- 
ber of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, a native of Kuopio. Finland, 
age 33 years, last heard from on the 
Pacific Coast in February. 1913; 
any one knowing his whereabouts 
will please communicate with Busi- 
ness Manager, The Seamen's Journal, 
San Francisco, Cal. 12-1-20 



Mrs. John M. Eshelman, 601 Un- 
derwood Bldg., San Francisco, is 
anxious to ascertain the whereabouts 
of Friend McHarvey, a native of 
California, age 40, last heard from 
while in Alameda county this spring, 
1921. 2-16-21 



Emil Nagard, 2438 Folsom street, 
San Francisco, California, is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of his 
brother, Joseph Louis Nagard, a 
member of the Marine Firemen's 
Union of the Pacific, last heard of 
at San F'rancisco, January, 1919. 

8-3-21 



Fore Grandinetti, of Campias, Bra- 
zil, brother of Cesaro Grandinetti, 
who died at sea, can recover $119.21, 
his distributive share of the estate 
of said Cesaro Grandinetti, by com- 
municating with Attorney Silas B. 
Axtell, 9 State St., New York, N. Y. 

4-13-21 



Mrs. Jeremiah T. Murphy, 39 Gecr 

Street, (ileus Falls, N. Y., is anxious 

certain the whereabouts of her 

Timothy J. Murphy, last heard 

arch, 1919, at Burkeburnett, 

I as. Those knowing his where- 

I abouta will please communicate with 

his mother. 8-31-21 



II 

Mr. Clynes English, labor 1c, 
declares many features of trade 
unionism arc out of date, and 
makes som. definite suggestions for 
a reform. 

Out of a total of 298,847 worl 
people, covered by the returns sup- 
plied to the Danish Statistical I >■ 
partmenl bj trade unions and by 
the ( entral Employment Exch n 
16.8 p r cent were unemployed on 
fulj 1. as compared with 18.6 al the 
end of May, and 2.1 per cent on 
June 25, 1920. 

Railroad traffic throughout Austria 
has been completely tied up by a 
strike, and thousands of visitors in 
Vienna From all parts of Europe an 
marooned. The walkout was called 
because of the objections of the 
workmen to the Government gradu- 
ated in. r.i e in their September al- 
lowances. They demanded a uniform 
increa ■ 

A statement issued by thi \m 
dam Municipal Statistical Bureau 
shows that the percentage of mem 
hers of trade unions affiliated to the 
State Unemployment Insurance Fund 
in thai city who were out of w oil, 
lii. aim iu June as in the pre- 
vious month, viz.. 23.4, as compared 
with 18,2 in June, 1920. I hi 
ii, include diamond workers, ol 
whom 90.5 per cent were un- 
employed in June. 90.8 per cent in 
May, and 72.3 per cent in June. 

A serious situation has arisen in 
the South Wales coal field 
to a misinterpretation of the terms 
of the settlement of the lasl 
strike, the Mines Departmenl requir- 
i to contribute a fut thi r 
ten shillings pi r ton amounting to 
£750,000 toward wages. The mine 
,, v , net - e> pei ted this urn to be pro- 
., ided from the governmenl >ub iid: 
{ £10,000,000, of which £3,000,000 
remain. Alter a hurried meeting 
railed in < ardiff, the coal exchange 
ov net - dei id< -1 to close a lai < 
number ..i the collieries. 

Mow, it is the tin minim' indus 
t r j .,i i ,i a 1 Britain thai is taking 
deadly toll of the worker's live 
The lasl Cornish tin mine was 
closed down. An industry which 
was tl blest in I .cat Britain, bav- 
in, i . en i at i ied on bj the Phoeni- 
cians lone before the invasion of 
the Romans, now is extinct, with the 
r< suit thai nearly 100,0 and 

their families are Starving in Corn- 
wall. 'I'm mining no longer is 
profitable, owing to the low price 
of tin with high price of coal and 
other neci ;ary materials. Recently 
a number of miners at Tincroft re 
turned thousands ol dollars in wage 
to the operators in efforts to keep 

tl e mines .joint'. Pathetic attempt 

arc being made to relieve the 'lis 
tress. In one typical case a choir 
gave a concert to raise funds to 

buy food, but the choir members 

, 1 1 ,, ... , ,1 for lack of nourish 
ment they had to discontinue the 
it when half through. As is 
always the case with destitution 

ulosis is adding to the tra- 
in many cases thi father, mother 
and all the children are suffering 
onsumption." Men 
who formerly were physical giants 
and worl ed in the tin mines all their 

...,n will be s bl they 

do "i-k if work- is available 
! In workers are beginning to 

bow much longer mismai 
tllll ,i ,,i industry is to remain iii the 
bands of a privileged few. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



i Domestic and Naval 



Fifteen hundred sailors, recruited 
in San Francisco, were returned to 
their "home" port last week aboard 
six destroyers, after four years' ser- 
vice with the Asiatic fleet. 

A contract to electrify the Chilean 
State railroad between Valparaiso 
and Santiago, at a cost of $7,000,000, 
irded to the Westing- 
house Electric and Manufacturing 
Company of Pittsburg, 

The cost of living in Massachu- 
setts has increased one and three- 
tenths per cent since June. The ad- 
vance in the cost of living is trace- 
able to the rise in food prices, which 
have increased six and five-tenths 
per cent since June. 

The Federal Barge Line on the 
Mississippi in the last five months 
carried 211,512 tons of freight at a 
saving to the public of 21) per cent 
in freight, or about $175,000. The 
line is carrying grain at 3.3 mills a 
ton mile, against an average of 11.06 
mills charged by Western railroads. 

•[ he Shipping Hoard has reje 
the bid of $2100 each offered by the 
Ship Construction and Trading 
Company, Inc., of New York, for 
186 of the Government's wooden 
ships. A new survey of the status 
of the wooden licet has been ordered 
by Chairman I.asker. 

Divorce of the Emergency Fleet 
Corporation from the United States 
Shipping Hoard, except for certain 
supervisory and regulatory powers 
to be retained by the latter I 
was announced October 1 by A. 1 >. 
I.asker, chairman of the board. 
Lasker retired as president of the 
ileet corporation. The other mem- 
bers of the board at the same time 
will cease to serve as trustees of 
the corporation. 

The Marine Department of the 
Chamber of Commerce at San Fran- 
cisco has received a caglegram 
from Antwerp stating the steamer 
"Swifteagle," from Portland, Ore., 
via Hamburg, arrived on September 
21, damaged, as a result of encoun- 
tering a storm. Heavy weather bat- 
tered the vessel around the North 
Sea, carrying away the starboard 
ventilator and smashing two others, 
and damaged all of her cargo by 
ling the hatches. 

Two hundred alien members of 
the crew of the "George Washing- 
ton." the largest passenger liner 
operating under the American flag, 
were discharged at New York, Sep- 
tember 29. in furtherance of the 
policy of the United States Shipping 
Board to have only American crews 
on American ships which it owns. 
R. C. Lee, assistant manager of the 
United States Line, which operates 
the "George Washington," said that 
similar action would be taken with 
regard to other Shipping Board ves- 
sels operated by the line. 

Liability of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway Company as a result of the 
wreck of the steamship "Princess 
Sophia" on Vanderbilt reef in Alas- 
kan waters, October 25, 1918, may 
not be limited as to claims of pas- 
sengers or their dependents or their 
baggage, Federal Judge* Jeremiah 
Xeterer held in a decision last week. 
This opens the way for claims for 
millions of dollars filed by relatives 
and dependents of the 349 victims of 
the sea disaster. Claims aggregating 
$2,500,000 are already on file in the 
case. These represent claims of 
relatives of 250 of those who went 
down on the "Sophia." Total claims 
will aggregate $3,500,000. 



Member of the Federal Reserve System 
And Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets .......... 

Deposits ........... 

Capital Actually Paid Up 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - - - - - 

Employees' Pension Fund 



PACKAGES. 



$71,383,431.14 

67,792,431.14 

1,000,000.00 

2,591,000.00 

357,157.85 



Bower, G. R. 
Christensen, Richard 
Clark, Fred W. 
Carpenter. Harold 
Pommelen, G. 
Elliott, Arthur W. 
Enberg, E. 
Fischer, Chas. O. 
Fagerberg, T. 
Fosse, H. 
Hallenberg. G. 
Hansen. Hans 
Hood. Alex. 
Johanessen. A. -2277 



Keith. J. 

Klemmetsen, Sigurd 
Lange, Walter 
Ljungqvist, HJ. 
I^arsen, J. -2012 
Maloney, J. J. 
Murphy. T. 
O'Connor. John J. 
Olsson, Carl J. 
Stein. N. 
Sidoroff. VS. 
Taylor, James B. 
Wagner. R. H. 



OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNT, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vlce-Pres. and Cashlsr 

E. T. KRT'SK. Vice-President 

A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEVKR, Manager Mission Branch 

W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT E. N. VAN BERGEN 

GEO. TOURNT I. N. WALTER ROBERT DOLIJLR 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW E A. CHRISTENSON 

L. S. SHERMAN WALTER A. HAAS 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys 



San Francisco Letter List 

Memners whose mall is advertised in 
these columns sin mid at once notify 
S. A. Silver. Business Manger. The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clay Street. San 
Francisco. Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and *ill be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 



Adams, Sam 
Adrian, Paul 
Ahrens, Walter 
Aimer. BOD 
Altonen, Carl 



1 Cansen, Jorgen 
l [ansson, Martin 
I lay, C. W. 
Handrup, Axel 
Hanschman, Wm. 



Anderson, C. -2344 Hansen, Andrew L. 
Anderson, H. B. -S384 

Andersen, Albert Hansen, ll. M. 

Anderson, E.-2459 I I -2267 

Anderson, Sivert Hanson. O. -2099 

Anderssen, W. Haugen, C, Et. 

Andersson, Chas. Heathorne, G. 

-1011 11 in. M. 

Andersson, C. J. Heikka, ]■:. J. 

-2185 I feiss, .1 te 

Anderson, Ingard Hendrlcksen, J. R. 

Andwerck, August Hetland. Ha Ivor 

Amtsen, August 1 Hlden, Reinhold 

A une. Edward Hildama. S. P. 

Austin. Tom Hoyt, W. V. 

Hohbv. Wm. 

Bell, Chas. Hubbard, Mi. hae] 

. Chas. P. Hvid, I 
Birkness, OIsJ 

Bjorseth, Konrad Ingebrethsen, A. 

Borgwardt, Curt Iverson, Iver 
Bostrom. Alfred 

Otto Jacklln. C 

I'.oman, Gunnar Jansson, J. H. -2951 
Bouch, Wm. "• W. J. It. 

Braman, George Jacobsen, Alfred 

Brandt, Blrger Jansson, K, Hj. 

Brennan. Martin Jameson, J. E. 

Blink, Harold Jei , itz 

Bridges, H. R. Jewell, AI. M. 

Bum. Joel Johannessen, Jo- 
Busch, W. hanes 

Buckler, R. E. Johanson, John R. 

Bywater, Chas. E. Johanson, Stefa 

nsson, Bi rnard 

Carlson, Gust -529 Johnson, n. 

Carlson. Chas. F. Joins, Alfi 

Carlson. Julius Johansson, Rudolf 

i 'arisen, Arnt Johansson. W. 
Carlsson, Carl -1601 -1334 

Carlsson, Gustav Johnson, Axel 

-776 Johnsson, C. J. 
i I arley J. -1566 

CatechI, a. V. Jonson. H. Eiiek 

Chapell, Wm. Jones, M. 

, Mariano Jorgensen. Emil 

Christiansen, Juniper. Foster P. 

Christian Jurikson, Julius 
Christensen, H. C. 

Christensen, Einar Kaktin, Ed 
Christinson, WilliamKamm. John 

George E. Karlson, William 
Comet, Magni A <K, Chas. M. 

Cordery. Allen Klemmetsen, Sigurd 

Corich, Fred A. Kliemann. Otto 
Creth, Dave '". Fritz 

Czarnetsky, F. Kosklnen, Bruno 

Krisjan, K. \v. 

Daly, Richard W. Kniiji, I ■. 

Danielsen, P. Kristoffersen, H. O. 

Haw, Walter H. Krause, Arthur 

DeLong, K. J. Kuhn. John 

I'.lin. Ole , . 

I olbey, Richard Lalne, Alhin A. 

is, R. W. Laine, Gustaf 

Dreyer. Trygve Larsen, Finvald 

Duke, F. larsen, Kaare T. 

Dumber, E. Larsen, Dagmar C. 
I anibert 

Joseph Larsen, LeU 

ind, Ingvald Larsson, Reinhold 

en, Thorlelf La Madrid, Ra 

toiiiott, A. W. Layne, Julian 
Ellis. Frank L. indahl, JVder 

Emmel, D. Richard 

Englin, C. Leon, Richard 

Esterhlll, G. B. Lewis, W. A. 

Liesen, Wm. 

Fail-brothers. Eddie Lilja, Birger 

Ferm i uist, Charlie Llndquist, O 
g, Arthur Llndenau, E. 

Forsberg, Hugo Little. M. R. 

Forsman, Andrew Lucey, James 

, Ellis E. Lundstrom, Anders 
Ford, D. more, B. X. 

Ford, E. H. Lydersen, p. 

Ford, Dough Lyman. T. 

Pore, A. R. Lynch, E. J. 
Fosse, Harald 

Herbert Mahoney, F. J. 

Franson, Alhin E. Magnusson, Carl 

Friberg, Chas. Maison, A. G. 
Fuller, Everett E. Mackenzie. Ed. 

Macdonald, Donald 

Gaare, Johan MacKenzie, Alex 

Groth. Fred McCaughey, Joe 

McGudden, Crank 

Hagen, Trygve McManus, P. 

Hall. Ross L. Maki, Wm. 

Halley, Wm. Manzano, Luis 

Hansen, Antonlus Mattos, M. 1 i. 



mott, T. B. Roth. C. M. 

McCormlck, H. W. Rundstrom. Albert 

Mci.can. Augus Ryan, T. 

i. Donald 

Meza, J. Sehaeffer, George 
Mi llo, m. N. V. 

Meolloy, Chas. P. Schlieman, F. 

Mikkclsen. Olaf M. Schmidt, !•:. II. 

v. T. e. Schnelle, W. 
Wool, John 

. R. Schibon, I'aul 

•Mull ins. John Schreff, Paul 

Murphy, Eddie Schroeder. C. F. 

Schultz, George 

Nalal, Henry De Sederholm, .1 n. 

""■ A S. Sehussler. C. M. 

o imann, John Seiffeii ll I 

X. C. -1224 Shapiro. Joseph 

Oskar Simmering, C. L. 

\','i le , r r s r, Sidoroff. X. 

Nielsen. Alf. V. K. Smart, Logan C. 

Nilsson, Axel-1176 Smith. John II 

Niery, D. R. Sobel, Ral 

Nilsson, Gustav Sonne. Hermann 

An. In. Sovlk, B. 

Xieolaisen. Aneker Spetteland. B. 

Nixon. L A. stall. Ralph M. 
N"'an. I . S. as ]; 

Nordstrom, H. Sternberg. Hj. X. 

Nor.lenherg. Alfred Stewart J II 

Nunstedt, Paul Stone. M. C. 

ndberg, K. K. 

Ogren, V. H. Swartz, G. W. 
Olavsen, Otto B. 

i Ms. ii, Alf. Tellefsen. Emil 

i ilsen. A. II. Terry, J. E. 
Olsen, Ole J. -1020Thode, Rudolf 

Olsen, Henrik P. Thorwlek, II. S. 

-478 Thomasen, Si 

i Usson. Albin Thorsson, N. 

Emil Thomson, Geo. H. 

Ojust, Emil A. Thome. A. \V. 

a. A. -1698 Thorsen, Carl 

rhowsky, Leo Timmermann, W. 

Oraya, Enrique Tjersland. Sverre 

Osses, Andrew TofTor. A. 

■ml. John Tomlin, Edward 

Owens, Leo Tourtellot, W. L 

_ Torgerson, Ed. 

A. B. Tosh. James M. 

Palludan, Chas. Touzel, Mr 

. J. E. Trout, ' Prank 

Pedersen, Soren Tyson, \\" 
Pankratz, B. 

I'aterson, Kenneth Vagner, John 

Paulsen, Axel J. VdKoov. s. F F 

Pedersen, W. -1535 Veckenstedt. Wm. 
Petterson, Ernst 

on, ' '. - 1 ."..". 1 Walker. A. 

Pett, Richard Walters, E. 

Petterson, C. V. Ward, Ste| 

Pedersen, Bysten Warner. Claude 

Pihlpik, C. Watson, A. 

ritali, Tony Walenius, Peter 

lilklnton, Homer Werang Ole 

Pope, Bert We is, Bruno 

nsen. Nicolai Wendel, Emil 

Rankin, Orrin i,. y A . j. 

ittl Wiklund, W'i. i.ir 
Raja, Joe ,,. [. \ V . 

n issen. Hans Williams. TerreU C. 

Jack Winther, Sigurd 

Rasmussen, Aksel Wilhelm Erick 

Reiersen, Johan A. v. i; u, 

Keiesgord. Hillm. Wood, Khliard 

Rodowiteh, Harry Worman. Albert 

Rogenfeldt, John Woischwltt, A 

Heinrlch \V II, y, James E. 

John 

Rosenberg, Louis Zlehr, Ernst 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Anyone knowing tne whereabouts 
of Charles Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, last heard of in 1916, 
address P. O. Box 673, Juneau, 
Alaska. His father, Peter Iverson, 
is anxious to hear from him. Kindly 
communicate with A. Johnsen, P. O. 
Box 65, Seattle, Wash. 7-20-21 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Elmar lives, a native of Reval, 
Esthonia, age 35 years, last heard 
from in leaving the S. S. "British 
Sun," in 1916. at Newport, R. I. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
will please communicate with Mr. 
Tamnberk, 3403 Twenty-sixth Street. 
rancisco, Cal. 10-5-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Captain (Cap.) Broyles would be 
greatly appreciated by his sister. 
< ap, if you are in trouble or any- 
thing wrong, don't be afraid to let 
me know where you are. I will help 
you. Mrs. hy Xarvis. 1'. O. Box 
3473, Portland. Ore. 10-5-21 



Brother of Carl Wohmar Holm, 
a native of Isle of Nargem, Es- 
thonia, born 1888, last heard of at 
Newport, Monmouthshire, England, 
on an American ship in 1916. Kindly 
communicate with Erik Kristian 
Holm, care National Sailors' and 
Firemen's Union, 9 Dubois street, 
Antwerp, Belgium. 7-27-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Joseph Bert Riese, a native of 
Cleveland, Ohio, last heard of De- 
cember 1, 1919, in Savannah, Ga., 
when he shipped on the SS. "West 
Apaim," please communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Joseph Riese, 4120 
Bailey avenue, Cleveland, O. 

6-29-21 



Phone Kearny B361 Union Tailors 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 
50 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



"■"" 1379 Your Old Friend JOE W E I S S 
WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 




92 FOURTH ST. nr. MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Union-Made Shoes for Men Exclusively 

Repairing Done While You Walt 
We use only the best leather that the market affords 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 
268 MARKET STREET 

Colducted by Capt. Chas. Ehlers 
Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSENS 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for parsing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



PENNRICH'S NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Mates' Courses, $55; by mail, $80. 
License guaranteed or fee refunded. 
Write for Full Particulars 
For Sale — Sextants and Marine 
Glasses. 

CAPTAIN W. PENNRICH, 

36 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Near Borough Hall, Sub. Station. 



Phone Garfield 2457 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHR1STENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 

Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



GEO. A. PRICE 



SAYS 



'BUSINESS IS GOOD. YOUR MONEY'S 

WORTH AND YOU KNOW IT. 

THERE IS A REASON." 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the accounL 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

?83 MARKET STREET, N««r F»urth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Thos. A. Jones, 720 N. Lancaster 
avenue, Dallas, Texas, is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of his son, 
Thos. Lenard Jones, a member of 
the Marine Firemen's Union of the 
Atlantic. 3-9-21 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Olaf Erling Hendriksen, a native 
of Norway, age 33, last heard from 
on the Atlantic Coast, kindly com- 
municate with his brother, Albert 
Hendriksen, Aalo Post Office, Chris- 
tiansand, Norway. 6-1-21 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1920 EDITION, $5.00 

UNIFORMS and SUITS, TO ORDER and READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 



36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 




You obtain full value for your shoe money when 
you buy 

W. L. DOUGLAS 

(Union Made) 

SHOES FOR MEN 

Vnu know that the price is right. The price is 
fixed at the factory and stamped on the sole 
of tin shoe. Also agents for 

STRONG & GARFIELD, JUST WRIGHT, 

WALK EASE 

Priced from 

$5.00 to $13.00 



PRICE'S 



Between Market and Mission 



AT THE DENVER CONVENTION 

the American Federation of Labor took official 
notice that 

— huge losses were suffered by workers last year 
through purchases of fraudulent and worthless 
securities. 

Convention Resolved 

— to call upon the United States Government "to rid 
the country of fraudulent schemers" 

— to assist the Government to bring to the attention 
of the union members the advantages of buying 
Treasury Savings Securities, issued in denomina- 
tions of 25c, $1, $5, $25, $IOO,'$IOOO 

Buy Them Through Your Post Office or Bank 
Government Loan Organization 

Second Federal Reserve District 
120 Broadway, New York 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SM OK" F R ^ See that this label ( in light blue ^ a w >ears on the 
1V1 KJ IV t. IX O box ^ which y 0U a re served. 



Issued by Authority 01 the Cigar Makers" Internal unai Union of America. 

Union-made Cigars. 

IViV y ^HllK TV wf y»M C>$irj <o JH vnoMn O'fO'ehoul tht world. 

V*X fjT^Ay M Wi*9«»Mtt *foe thi* UM mil be pwti*<i *cawdiw( to Iwk 



V CM/t/ct 



>/ jiiOmjti 



W: » " 



STAUrs 



1 Mows fro ni .Aaron-l I 



i 



The Canadian Government has 
loaned her returned slodiers more 
than $80,000,000 to pay for stock 
and equipment for farms which they 
have eighter bought or homesteaded. 

The Toyo Kisen Kaisha liner 
"Persia Maru" was afire in Yoko- 
hama recently. The blaze was ex- 
tinguished without loss of life, and 
slight damage to the ship. 

A fight, last week, between a de- 
tachment of the Philippine con- 
stabulary and a band of Moros at 
Parang, Island of Tolo, resulted in 
the death of a Filipino lieutenant 
of the constabulary forces and two 
members of the Moro band. One 
Filipino lieutenant of constabulary, 
several enlisted men and one Moro 
were wounded. 

Recent dispatches from Lima, 
Peru, state that Federal troops 
have clashed with revolutionists near 
Moyobamba, in the department of 
Loreto, where the Government last 
month closed the port of Iquitos 
and other harbors because of re- 
volts. Twenty-three Federal soldiers 
were killed or wounded, and the 
bodies of fifty-two insurrectionists 
were found after the clash. 

The assistance of the League of 
Nations against the Bolshevists has 
been asked by representatives of the 
four Caucasian republics — Armenia, 
Azerbaijan, Northern Caucasus, and 
Georgia, whose territory is now 
under Soviet domination. They in- 
formed the League that they had 
joined their interests in a political 
and economic union, and asked the 
League's aid in securing the evacua- 
tion of their territory "by foreign 
troops." 

Agreements between the United 
States and Japan relative to the 
future status of the island of Yap, 
as reported in press dispatches, con- 
stitutes a violation of China's sover- 
eignty and the principle of national 
equality, says an identic note trans- 
mitted to the American and Jap- 
anese legations by the Chinese 
foreign office. The Chinese note 
maintains the American-Japanese 
agreement cannot authorize Japan to 
lay a cable between Shanghai and 
the island of Yap without securing 
the consent of China. 

Hundreds of persons are believed 
to have perished last week in a 
typhoon in Southern and Western 
Japan. bloods at Nagoya claimed 
scores of victims, and caused more 
than 1,000,000 yen damage to prop- 
erty and shipping. Heavy loss of 
life is feared among the fishing craft 
off the western coast, as more than 
one hundred small vessels with 
crews totaling nearly a thousand 
nun. are missing. The homeless in 
the southwestern provinces from the 
flood are estimated at between ten 
thousand and twenty thousand. 

Moscow reports that Leon Trotzky, 
Soviet War Minister, addressed 
nearly ten thousand Bolshevik 
troops recently in "Red Square," 
gathered to honor the graduating 
elass of fifty men from the general 
staff school. Trotzky was received 
enthusiastically, despite a rainstorm. 
"There arc two fronts now," he 
.said, "but it is tOO early to change 
our weapons for peace implements. 
bin- famine has given our enemies 
encouragement. France intends to 
array Poland and Rumania against 
us. We 111 ready to make conces- 
sions, for we want to live peace- 
fully." 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



IJllllllilllliiillillllliilllillllilil.:: ,.;ii!iiii;.iii;ii,;Lii., 



V/ith the V/its 



limiiini :;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihi 

Mother— "Hush! Vou two chil- 
dren are always 'i"" rr eling. Why 
can't you agree once in a while?" 

Georgia — "We do agree, mamma. 
Edith wants the largest apple and 
so do I." Houston Post. 



Tramp — Kind lady, I need help. 
Vou catl see for yourself that my 
trousers are mere straps. 

The Kind Lady — Then I must 
warn you that the dog is fond of 
ps. 



Tourist — "1 suppose the people 
were quite agitated when that gang 
of international thieves went through 

Native — "Yes, the Government 
even put locks on the canal." 



"Edith, your mother tells me that 
you serve refreshments to all the 
young nun who can call on you." 

"Y«s, papa." 

"Well, you must think 1 have 
money to hum, feeding the flames 
that was." 



MacTavish — "Ay, it's a wunnerfu' 
echo. When folk roond ahoot here 
gang tae their beds, they juist put 
their lieids oot o' the window an' 
shout, an' the echo waukens them 
i' the moniin'!' — The Passing Show 
( London ). 



Harlequin — Artists say that five 
lour inches is the divine height 
for women, sweetest. 

Columbine — Oh, hut I'm five feet 
six inches. 

Harlequin ("quickly) — Oh, but you're 
more than divine — Sydney Bulletin. 



"You were going faster than the 
law allows." declared the traffic po- 
liceman. 

"Act humble and penitent," whis- 
pered Mr. Chuggins' wife. 

"I'll try. But it's hard to conceal 
my pride. 1 didn't know the old 
boat had it in 'er." — Washington Star. 



It's 



He — "I liked that last piece. 
highly educational." 

Sin-— "Educational? Why, 
about a horrid vamp." 

I le "Just so. You see T 
meet a horrid vamp some day and 
then I'll know how to urotect my- 
self." 



it - 



may 



The young married couple wire 
dining out. In the middle of their 
meal a tall and beautiful woman, 
passing near their table, gave the 
young man a look of recognition and 
a dangerous smile. So dangerous, in 
fact, was the smile that the \ 
wife said: "John, who was that 

woman?" 

John held up his hand. "Now, 
for goodness' sake," said he, "don't 
'j,ci bothering me about who si 
I shall have trouble enough explain- 
ing to her who you are." 



Here is a story from a Cincinnati 
picture show: The Literary Di- 
"Topics in Brief" were being shown. 
They included the story of the man 
who, when asked if he liked Omar 
Khayyam, replied: "I never drank 
it," and whose wife objected: "You 
t not have said that — it's a kind 
of cheese." 

A girl in the audience laughed and 
said: 'That's a good one," and the 
girl next to her asked, "Well, what 
is it?" The first pirl replied, "A 
cigaret." — Literary Digest. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
ol CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
teach any brandi of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American .stamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now. in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 

500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

1 lezzanith's. Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's Compasses, 
Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sounding Machines, Sextants, 
Parallel Rulers Pelorus, Dividers, Nautical Books, Charts 
and Tide Tables. Fully equipped department for the 
repair and adjustment of chronometers, watches and 
clocks. This work is in charge of an expert of American 
and European experience. All work guaranteed. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866— over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds an Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Diamonds 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



Seamen! Watch for Developments 

See Our Weekly Reports Posted in All Union Halls. 

I have said that I would never be attorney for shipowners, until the 
seamen were shipowners. One of the purposes of my visit to Europe this 
summer is to acquire knowledge as to shipping conditions abroad and 
particularly to ascertain with what degree of success the seamen of 
Italy are operating ships. 

Any seamen, who. with a view to becoming shipowners some time, are 
willing to form "a Seamen's Society for Savings" and will pledge to save 
one-fourth of their wages over their board and lodging per annum, said 
savings to be put in a depository that they themselves may select, please 
lommunieate with the undersigned. 

Silas B. Axtell, 9 State St., New York City 




Qames J?. £oren$ea 



SILVERWARE g CLOCKS 

for wedding presents. Large stock to select from. 

ScwnaenCa 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

715 Market St., between Third and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco 

All Watch and Jewelry Repairing Guaranteed 

Gifts that last by the thousand 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Established 1874 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wall on mally and show 

you a larfre assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want v<nir Panama blocked 
ll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

762 VALENCIA ST., San Francisco 
Phone Park 9401 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 




uv^ 



T F 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 


A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXXV, No. 6. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1921. 


Whole No. 1774. 



Jieim Y©shps 9 Success of HE&dlu&sftiHi&l Accndleimtl CoinminmissHoini IR©vii©wedl 



The following is a synopsis of an address 
delivered before the California State Federation 
of Labor on October 4, 1921, by Will J. 
French, Chairman California Industrial Accident 
Commission: 

"A glance backward over the first decade of 
workmen's compensation in California is worth 
while, because of the widespread interest in the 
law and its close connection with the two 
groups of employers and employes. The social 
purpose of relieving the distress that follows in- 
dustrial injuries brings all citizens within the 
compensation orbit. The principle of adding 
the human cost to the other costs of industry 
is sound, because it is the cost deserving first 
consideration, and its belated addition showed 
the United States as the last of the nations of 
the world to overthrow the old system of em- 
ployers' liability. It is comforting to realize 
that more progress has been made in this land 
during the last ten years than anywhere else on 
the globe. 

"Californians will remember the. strong oppo- 
sition to the introduction of the compensation 
system. The men and women of labor advocated 
the better way. They were supported by citi- 
zens who recognized the injustice of permitting 
an injured man to shift for himself after he gave 
limb or blood to help industry proceed. And 
when he made the supreme sacrifice there was 
a call that bis widow and children should not 
be forsaken and left destitute, and this call has 
been answered in part and should be answered 
in full. 

"The compensation system is now recognized 
as superior to employers' liability, and those 
men at the head of industrial enterprises who 
resisted compensation because they did not be- 
lieve they should have to pay for accidents they 
wire not responsible for speedily saw the 
strength of the argument that the human toll 
was a legitimate cost and should be charged to 
the finished product by means of insurance. 
Students of compensation will remember the 
opposition of the San Francisco Chronicle and 
the l.os Angeles Times. Roth of these papers 
were converted and have admitted their former 
position was unsound. On May 19, 1920, the 
San Francisco Chronicle editorially said under 
the heading, 'The State Compensation Act: We 
long since discovered that we were wrong. The 
Compensation Act is a good law. admirably ad- 
ministered.' On January 2, 1918, the T.os An- 
geles Times stated in an editorial: 'The In- 
dustrial Accident Commission has been wel- 
comed alike by the employer and the employe 



and will probably become a fixture in the gov- 
ernment of California. The Commission has 
succeeded in giving to the public something 
definite and desirable in return for the money 
expended.' These expressions are typical of the 
changed view of many newspapers and indi- 
viduals in California. 

"In presenting figures gleaned from statistics 
carefully prepared by the Industrial Accident 
Commission, it must be remembered that the 
Roseberry elective law was in force in California 
for the first two years and four months of the 
ten years since September 1, 1911. There were 
no facilities during the earlier period for gather- 
ing statistical information. After the compulsory 
law came into operation on January 1, 1914, the 
first two years did not afford opportunity for 
collecting complete data, because the law was 
new and time was necessary to learn the re- 
quirements of accident reporting. Consequently 
the figures quoted represent definite and accu- 
rate information in the Commission's files, plus 
estimates of industrial injuries for the full ten- 
year period. 

"For the years 1912 to 1920, inclusive, there 
were reported 5358 California industrial deaths 
(including thirty women), 13,374 permanent in- 
juries and 687.081 temporary injuries, giving a 
total of 705,813. The Commission can accu- 
rately estimate that there were approximately 
1,000,000 industrial injuries in this State during 
the last ten years. Life pensions were awarded 
104 permanently disabled men. 

"No data is available for the year 1912 in 
considering compensation payments to injured 
men and women. From 1912 to 1920, inclusive, 
the sum of $26,971,863 was paid in compensation, 
$8,916,901 for medical, surgical and hospital 
treatment, a total of $35,888,764. 

"The magnitude of the work done in the 
Compensation Department is shown by the 
records of 11,145 cases decided where contro- 
versies existed. It was necessary to hold 
13,619 hearings to decide these cases. In addi- 
tion, the Commission has passed upon 5105 
supplementary proceedings and also 2125 settle- 
ment agreements. Many thousands of incipient 
controversies were adjudicated by the San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles offices. Compensation 
was paid without contest in the great majority 
of injuries, because the law specifies the amounts 
due. 

"Certificates of consent to self-insure have 
been issued to 242 employers since January 1, 
1918, Security to the amount of $4,407,000 lias 
been deposited with the State Treasurer by 



these employers, whose total average number of 
employes was approximately 212,303. 

"The State Compensation Insurance Fund 
opened its doors on January 1, 1914. During 
1914 the premiums written by the State Fund 
were $547,161.24, and each succeeding year has 
shown a steady increase. In 1920 the total was 
$4,417,761.32. The total volume of compensation 
business transacted by about thirty carriers in 
California during 1920 was $12,944,506.67, and 
the State bund did 34.13 per cent of this busi- 
ness. On June 30, 1921, the State Fund's 
assets were $5,651,924 05 and the net surplus 
was $1,729,797.97 after paying dividends to 
policy holders to the amount of $2,892,827.58. 
It is this custom of returning excess premiums 
to employers that makes the State Fund popular 
with those who have to purchase compensation 
coverage. 

"The 1913 California Legislature appropriated 
$100,000 for the use of the State Compensation 
Insurance Fund, in order to provide a working 
capital. Not one cent of this $100,000 was 
called upon. The 1921 California Legislature 
unanimously passed a bill providing for the 
return of the $100,000 to the State Treasury. 
The bill was approved by Governor Stephens 
and the money is now in the State's strong box. 

"The Safety Department is of prime impor- 
tance. The records show that twenty sets of 
safety orders have been issued for the larger 
industries of California. Industrial operations 
have been revolutionized by the general accep- 
tance of the safety principle. The co-operation 
of employers and employes is fine. More than 
14,000 plants have been inspected, employing 
approximately 800,000 employes. In addition, 
within the last few years 7945 boilers. 2038 air 
tanks and 13,116 elevators have received visits 
from the Commission's engineers, and the elec- 
trical inspections number 1373. During the past 
six months an intensive safety campaign was 
started in the oil fields of the southern part of 
the State. Not one fatal accident lias been 
reported to the Commission in the mining in- 
dustry since June 10 last, a record in itself, 
because mining operations contribute heavily to 
the death and injury columns. 

"The record -.bows a decrease of 31.21 per 
cent in the death rate per 100,000 of population 
in California from 1914 to 1920, and this en- 
couraging showing should be an incentive to 
further conserve human life, the true wealth of 
a State or Nation. To this end it behooves each 

employed man and woman to usi afeguards 
and protective devices, to practice safety, to 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



discourage carelessness arid to avoid flirting 
with the undertaker. 

"The Industrial Accident Commission lias an 
altogether too limited force of safety engineers. 
The work sorely needed to be done can only 
be skimmed. Additional funds should be pro- 
vided for safety purposes. The ensuing benefit 
would be a fewer number of industrial deaths 
and injuries, in which benefit the employes 
would be the principal gainers." 



LABOR MUST BE VIGILANT 



Delegates to the recent national con- 
vention of the United Mine Workers of 
America were profoundly stirred by a 
letter from Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo 
Vanzetti, the Italian labor organizers 
awaiting the death in the electric chair in a 
Massachusetts jail. A voice from the death 
house, it was none the less resonant with 
courage and fidelity to labor's ideals. 

"We are not afraid to die," the con- 
demned Italians write, "but we do not 
want to die uselessly. Let our death — if 
we must die — usher in a world where there 
will be no master class to still the voices 
of those who would be free." 

Miners' locals all over the country have 
been generous in their support of the 
defense for the jailed men, according to 
members of the Sacco-Vanzetti Defense 
Committee. Even the West Virginia locals, 
in the throes of their own life and death 
grappling with subsidized thugs, have sent 
money and expressions of loyalty to the 
frame-up victims. Probably it was this 
circumstance which prompted the imperiled 
Italians to address their first public state- 
ment since the verdict to the miners' 
convention. 

An appeal to the higher courts will be 
heard on November 1 and a motion for a 
new trial, on the ground that the result 
was not justified by the evidence as well 
as on the ground of newly discovered 
evidence, will be ruled upon by Judge 
Webster Thayer. If this legal recourse 
fails, Sacco and Vanzetti will go to the 
electric chair — unless organized labor for- 
bids the atrocity. Impartial observers are 
agreed that the verdict is not supported 
by the testimony. The defense charges 
that only a jury drugged with prejudice 
against aliens and "reds" could have con- 
victed on such inadequate, highly circum- 
stantial evidence. Even the Boston Ameri- 
can, which has no sympathy for labor 
agitators, called the evidence "most un- 
convincing." 

The committee, whose address is Box 
37, Hanover Station, Boston, Mass., is 
appealing to labor groups and individuals 
to finance the defense. 

The letter signed by the condemned 
men reads as follows: 

"Dedham Jail, Sept. 20. 1021. 

"We have been wrongly convicted of an 
atrocious murder committed by persons 
other than ourselves. The crime was one 
entirely independent of the struggle of 
the workers to better their conditions. 

"We are not afraid to die. Every worker 
in the performance of- his tasks as an in- 
dustrial serf faces death a thousand times. 
Death — we do not fear. We do revolt 
against having our heart-beats stopped for 
a crime that we did not commit, indeed, 
for a crime that possesses no industrial or 
social significance. 

"From the earliest years of our young 
manhood up to the time of our arrest, 
we gave unsparingly of our time, our 



labor and the money we earned by hard 
labor to tin- education of the workers, 
preparatory to the day when the workers 
might emancipate themselves. We are not 
the type of men who steal and murder. 
No man who is in a normal mental condi- 
tion ever commits murder. Crimes of force 
prove conclusively that there is some dis- 
eased social condition existing in society. 
It is a symptom of individual and social 
maladjustment. 

"There is no need here for us to retell 
the story upon which conviction was built. 
A fine net work of lies was built and 
innocent acts of ours were contorted by 
the vicious minds of those who saw in the 
champions of labor only 'enemies of the 
people.' American capitalism cannot under- 
stand that a man can be an unafraid fighter 
against exploitation and at the same time 
have a mind and a heart that revolt against 
crimes of violence. The 'frame-up' was 
finished off by showing that we believed 
that to the workers belonged the products 
of their toil. This was reason enough for 
our conviction. 

"If we go to the electric chair, we go 
not because we were 'proven' guilty of the 
crime charged against us but because of 
our ideals. If we go, we shall go loy«d 
and unswerving in our devotion to the 
principles that, unpopular and frowned 
upon today, shall dominate tomorrow. If 
we die, we die knowing that members of 
the advance guard must always die. We 
ask only — that our death shall not be 
useless and that you, the workers in the 
mines of America, who make possible the 
industrial life of America, shall make more 
eloquent our death than we were able to 
make our lives. We do not want to die 
uselessly. Let our death — if we must die — 
usher in a world where there will be no 
master class to still the voices of those 
who would be free. 

"Fraternally yours, 

"NICOLA SACO ). 
"BARTOLOME( I VANZETTI." 



INJUNCTION DENIED 



The following is Judge Griffiths' de- 
cision on application of Pacific Coast Coal 
Company for injunction to restrain striking 
miners from picketing: 

"Gentlemen: This case on both sides 
has been carefully prepared and ably 
presented. I doubt if any facts or any 
law relating to the subject matter of this 
particular branch of the case has been 
omitted, any fact or point of law in the 
minds of counsel bearing upon the par- 
ticular issue before the Court. A number 
of months ago a case was before me — I 
have forgotten the title of it — it may be 
on appeal — very much similarity between 
that case and this — that was a strike case 
involving some business plant on the water 
front of this city, and it was argued after 
submission of it, upon affidavits, but it 
was not argued, it wasn't presented so 
thoroughly as this case. And I have 
listened very attentively to both affidavits 
and arguments and citations, thinking that 
probably I ought to distinguish this case 
from that, and I listened very carefully 
because of the importance of the matter 
at issue not only to the miners and to the 
operators but to the general public, of 
which, of course, the Court is a part, and 
also because of the gravity of the situation 



up there and the gravity that is likely to 
attend any strike of any magnitude. In 
that case to which 1 refer I was unable 
to find a sufficient showing to warrant 
the Court in issuing a temporary in- 
junction and I therefore refused to grant 
a temporary injunction. I am unable, 
gentlemen, to see any essential difference 
on the facts between that case and this 
one. I think the showing here is insuffi-. 
cient to entitle the plaintiff to a writ of 
injunction. It seems to me the injunction 
ought not to issue without a clear showing 
of intimidation, coercion, violence or breach 
of the peace. Now, as I recall the facts 
in this case, there are practically only two 
instances of violence. One instance, as I 
recall, is where one of the affiants struck 
a striker, and another striker struck the 
affiant, and the affiant says that a deputy 
sheriff restored order, and the other in- 
stance is where a deputy sheriff himself 
struck a striker or a strike sympathizer. 
Those are the only two clear instances or 
exhibitions of real violence. It is true 
that men may strike, and it is likewise 
true that workers — men — are entitled to 
work. But strikers must know that strike, 
if at all, deplorable as it is, must be carried 
on without resort to intimidation, coercion, 
violence, or breach of the peace, and that 
if it is not carried on without recourse to 
these extremes, the Courts will rigorously 
enforce the law to maintain order and to 
preserve the peace and to protect em- 
ployers as against any act of a striker or 
strikers tending to a breach of the peace 
or constituting violence or intimidation or 
coercion. 

"I do not see from the facts disclosed 
that the sheriff's office is not able to 
control the situation up there and maintain 
order. There is nothing so far shown, 
it seems to me, to warrant the arm of 
the Court of equity being extended therefor 
or on account of the inability of the 
ordinary law of the land to protect the 
rights of both parties to this controversy. 
I think a Court of equity ought to be 
reluctant to supersede the ordinary law of 
the land. I think there ought to be some 
showing that there is not or cannot be 
afforded the protection that all citizens are 
entitled to whether they are in business or 
not. whether they are operators or miners. 
T think I am warranted in holding the 
showing for the time being is insufficient 
to warrant the issuance of the temporary 
injunction, and for that reason the re- 
straining order will be dissolved." 



LABOR TURNOVER COSTLY 



It costs $100 to "hire and fire" an office 
clerk, according to figures made public by 
the National Employment Hoard. It was 
also shown that employers lose $60 by dis- 
charging a common laborer, ranging from 
a trucker to a machine hand. These fig- 
ures wen gathered in a survev, which in- 
cluded cost of time spent in interviewing, 
s :lecting, examining, training and watch- 
in- the "new employe." It also included 
the losses the company must hear until he 
learns his duties. 



Trade unionism, like Time, knows 

neither beginning nor end. It is the 

Genesis and Revelations of the human 
soul. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



LABOR FOR DISARMAMENT 



Armistice Day demonstrations will be 
truly national. 

Reports thus far received by President 
Gotnpers from central labor bodies 
throughout the country assure the suc- 
cess of the great event. 

In most cases central bodies have ar- 
ranged to hold both a parade and mass 
meeting. 

New York City will hold its demon- 
stration in historic Madison Square gar- 
den that seats fifteen thousand persons. 
Tex Richard, lessee of the great struc- 
ture, has donated its use to the trades 
and labor council. 

Washington, D. C, will probably hold 
its meeting in beautiful Central High 
School Auditorium, marching to the meet- 
ing in line with various organizations, 
which are co-operating. 

Louisville, Ky., reports plans that will 
"rival the demonstrations in many larger 
cities." 

Philadelphia plans one of the greatest 
parades ever held in the Quaker City. It 
will be followed by a mass meeting in 
the Municipal Tabernacle. 

From every section come reports of a 
determination to impress upon the inter- 
national conference for limitation of arma- 
ment the conviction of the American peo- 
ple that "the time has come to disarm." 

In addition to the encouraging reports 
from cities throughout the country, A. F. 
of L. headquarters reports plans for the 
first assembling of the disarmament ad- 
visory council invited by President Gom- 
pers to meet here. A committee on ar- 
rangements was called to meet this week 
to make preparations for the assembly of 
approximately one hundred Advisory 
Committee members, and also to take 
under consideration certain most impor- 
tant proposals in relation to the more 
permanent work which is being developed 
to run through to the end of the interna- 
tional conference. 

Following are some of the cities which 
have reported plans for Armistice Day 
demonstrations : 

Washington, D. C ; New York, Jersey 
City, Philadelphia, Fort Wayne, Ind. ; 
Lansing, Midi.; L'tica, X. Y. ; Mason City, 
Iowa: Somerset, Ky. ; Uniontown, Pa.; 
Du Quoin, 111.; Bera, Cal.; La Junta, 
'olo.; Hot Springs, Ark.; Zanesville, 
Ohio; llibbing, Minn.: La Fayette, Ind.; 
Clinton, Ind.; Tampa, Fla. ; South Rich- 
mond, Va. ; Aurora, 111.; I'ekin, 111.; Jack- 
son, Miss.; Atlanta, Ga.; Wilmington, N. 
C; Middlesboro, Ky. ; Columbus, Ohio; 
Mulberry, Kansas; Peru, Ind.; Jolict, 111.; 
A lien town. Pa.; Moberly, Missouri; Alli- 
ance, Ohio; Thurber, Tex.; Leavenworth, 
Kansas: Wichita, Kansas; Grand Forks, 
X.D.; Fairmont, W. Va. ; Meridian, Miss.; 
Altoona, Pa.; Lockport, N. Y. ; Fargo, 
N. I).; La Crosse, Wis.; Pawtucket, R. I.; 
Terre Haute, Ind.; Westville, 111.; Ever- 
ett, Wash.; Spokane, Wash.; Ashland, 
Wis.; Douglas, Ariz.; Waterloo, Iowa; 
Edwardsville, 111.; Des Moines, Iowa: 
Toledo, Ohio; Pottsville, Pa.; Louisville, 
Ky. ; South Stillwater, Minn.; Fort Leav- 
enworth, Tex.; Eldorado, Ark.; Fvans- 
villc, Ind.; Byesville, Ohio; Watertown, 
Wis. 

British trade unionists stand with 
American trade unionists on the disarma- 



ment issue, and declare that the exten- 
sive program of armament "is contrary 
to the spirit and policy of disarmament 
and peace." 

The P.ritishers call "for the suspension 
of all preparations for war, at least until 
the disarmament conference has finished 
its work." 

This information received by President 
Gompers is in response to his recent sug- 
gestion to the trade union movements of 
England, France, Italy and Japan that 
world-wide demonstrations be held in the 
interest of peace. 

In a letter to the A. F. of L. executive, 
C. W. Bowerman, secretary of the par- 
liamentary committee of the British 
Trades Union Congress, incloses this reso- 
lution passed by the congress at its meet- 
ing in Cardiff, just adjourned : 

"This Congress learns with satisfaction 
that the President of the United States 
is calling an international conference to 
discuss the question of the disarmament 
of nations, with which policy it is fully 
in accord. 

"In the opinion of this Congress, how- 
ever, such a conference will not be satis- 
factory unless labor is adequately repre- 
sented thereon, and understanding that 
Great Britain will take part in such con- 
ference this Congress claims the right to 
appoint representatives of organized labor 
to attend the conference, seeing that the 
subject to be discussed is a matter vitally 
affecting the interests of the workers in 
all nations. 

"The Congress further protests against 
the recent decision of the I'.ritish Govern- 
ment to carry out an extensive program 
of armaments which is contrary to the 
spirit and policy of disarmament and 
peace, as advocated repeatedly by mem- 
bers of the Government themselves. 

"The Congress fu-ther asks for the sus- 
pension of all preparations for war at 
least until the disarmament conference 
has finished its work." 



HUGE PROFITS OF PACKERS 



When the attorneys representing the I 
meat packers appeared before Judge Al- 
schuler about three months ago in an 
effort to show why the wages of the 
workers should be reduced the claim was 
made that lower wage rates were neces- 
sary to prevent the conduct of the packing 
business at a loss. 

Since that time, Swift & Company in 
an advertising campaign to sell ten-year 
notes that will bear 7 per cent interest 
states that during the last eleven years 
their clear profits amounted to $149,537,- 
840 and of this amount $72,099,380 (or 
more than 48 per cent) has been put back 
in the business and that the total sales 
increased from $250,000,000 in 1909 to 
over $1,100,000,000 in 1920. 

The "Butcher Workman," official organ 
for the Amalgamated Butcher Workmen 
of America, states, "These advertisements 
contain admission the packers' attorneys 
did not dare to make at the wage hear- 
ings." 

They plead poverty in an effort to re- 
duce wages and huge profits to sell bonds. 



Coal land monopoly in West Virginia 
has created in the mining districts two 
distinct classes, the. unemployed and the 
gunemployed. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia— 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adeliade, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 

Butchers and Bakers, 14-16 Central Building, 41 

North John Street, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 

Transportarbeiter Verband, Reichsabteilung 
Seeleute. Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, 
Germany. 

FRANCE 

General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan 7, 
Bergen. , 

SWEDEN 
Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Langgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbogade, 15 Copen- 
hagen. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Copenhagen. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, L. Strand- 
strade 20, Copenhagen. 

HOLLAND 
Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

ITALY 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Corso Principe Odofie 2, Genoa, Italy. 
SPAIN 
Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocineros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle 
Inglaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363- (Altos). 
BRAZIL 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedistinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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n 

^iiuiiiimmiiiiimiuiiiiiiir.:iiiiiiiiiiillilliilllillilllliuimMiimi;mi!iti;ililiiililiimiimiiiiiiiiii£|| 

Pacific Coast Mnilno 

gBiHiHmiiiHiiiimiiiniimminnniimHmimimniinnniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiminiiiiiiiiiiiiniii^ 



During the past week a .ureat num- 
ber of vessels have run ashore at 
various points in the Straits of Juan 
l)c Fuca. Dense fogs have been the 
the mishaps. 

The new Board of Harbor Com- 
moners at San l'edro took un- 
usual action when it caused to be 
published announcements that when 
more bond money was available for 
the contemplated improvements pref- 
erence in work would be given t<> 
fide residents of Los Angeles 
who are American citizens. 

Second of the three largest tankers 
of the Standard < lil Company of 
California, the "II. M. Storey." fif- 
teen thousand tons deadweight, slid 
down the way at the Alameda plant 
of the Union Iron Works on sched- 
ule time, last week. The vessel was 
then towed to the San Francisco 
shipyards of the builders for final 
construction work. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Corn 
pany reports a full cargo for both 
the "Empire State" and the "lloosier 
State," which sails on October 12 
for the Orient. A few weeks ago 
steamers were leaving port 
several hundred tons short of a 
capacity load. The steamer "San 
Juan." sailing for Mexican and Cen- 
tral American ports today, is also 
taking a full cargo. 

Stalled in the fog outside the 
heads for two days, the steamer 
"Griffdu" successfully proved the ef- 
ficiency of the Navy radio compass 
control station. The wireless opera- 
tor on the "Griffdu" sent out calls 
asking for his position. The triple 
system was worked from Bolinas to 
the Farallone Islands and thence to 
the ship and in a few minutes the 
"Griffdu" operator was informed by 
radio his exact position. 

The Robert Dollar Steamship 
Company, which purchased the for- 
mer German bark "Walkure," has 
changed the name of the vessel to 
"William Dollar." The newly chris- 
tened '■William Dollar" is a four- 
masted bark, and is the largest sail- 
ing vessel of its class in the world. 
It is capable of carrying 5100 dead- 
weight tons, and when in the lum- 
ber carrying trade could carry three 
million feet of lumber. 

The Hammond Lumber Company 
hung up a new port record at San 
l'edro recently for the number of 
steamers arriving in one day at one 
dock with cargoes consigned to one 
firm. Nine steamers arrived at the 
Hammond docks, and more than 
eleven million feet of lumber was 
brought in by the nine steamers. 
The steamers touching at the Ham- 
mond docks included the "Egeria," 

"Win. Donovan, I'rinidad." "Santa 

Inez," "W'ahkeena," "Katherinc," 
"Santa Alicia" and "Daisy Mathews." 

Foreign tonnage was offered last 
week at a new low- rate, since the 
war. for barley or wheat from the 
Pacific Coast to the United Kingdom 
or Europe, according to brokers. A 
foreign vessel was on the market 
at ?2 shillings 6 pence. This is 2 
shillings. 6 pence lcs's than the 
lowest rates this year, either during 
the present low market or during 
that which obtained a few months 
A raid of Japanese carriers 
started the market on the decline a 
few weeks ago, and while Japanese 
have not figured in tin- most recent 
charters, the rate has been yielding 
Steadily, to the exclusion of Ameri- 
can tonu 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 

SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 

Prices 

Represented by 



All work done in 

our own sanitary 

workshop 

E. PEGUILLAN 



Established 
for 20 years 



Tacoma, Wash. 



Phone Main 2941 

SEAMEN! 

Meet your friends for a sood time 

in pool BXld 'aids at 

H. BADER'S 

CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 
2115 North 30th Street, Old Town 
Tacoma, v. 



SEAMEN!— 

When in Tacoma eat at the 

North Star Restaurant 

SI ricUy Union l rouse 

NERHEIM & STROM, Proprietors 

North 30, Old Town 
Tacoma, Wash. 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 




S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE- s. (i. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing. Cleanlnq and Pressing 
2d Floor. Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUPOF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts.. Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



MARINE ENGINEERING — NAVIGATION 

We prepare you for examination in four to six weeks— either course. 
Eighty dollars pays for individual instruction until you get your license. 

THE TECHNICAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

W. P. Pierson, Principal 
Phone Fillmore 9 7 0—2707 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Anderson, Gunnar 
Aptnaltla, Antony 
Amundsen. Ben 
Allen, E. 
Blixt, Oustaf 
Boyle, Hugh 
Boa, H. C. 
Harlow, Joseph 
Berglund. Bmil J- 
Bleker, Mai thi w 
Baartman, J. H. 
Brady. K. C. 
Bjorseth, K. M. 
Bennett, Chas. C. 
Bakke, Eilif J. 
Cormack, W. 
Corrigan, Reul B. 
I ..• Mon, Earl 
Bskola, Henry 
Erickson, Hans E. 
Engler, Samuel 
Elze, Carl 
I 'mis. Axel R. 
Fischer, Chas. O. 
l-'rick. H. C. 
Fielding, P. 
Foster, Clarence 

,;m. Paul 
Golden, Roy L. 
Gray, John 
Gorman, Peter A. 
Green, Joe 
II. in. M. 
Hansen, Harold v. 

Hansen. Thorwnld 
l ieikka, !•:■ 
Hall, Robert E. 
Hopperman, H. 
Holman, Martin 
Hanson, William 
Huber, Charles L. 
Howell. E. W. 
Hines, Leo 
Holmes, M. 
Inguealsen. Arthur 
Jegstrup, Harold 
Johanson, K. 12. 
Jensen, (lust 
Jordan, Gdw. n. 
Judge, John 
Jonsson, R. II. -2699 

en, T. -8040 
Jensen, Emanuel 
Jensen, Chris 

-2278 
Keller. E. 
Kane, J. 

Albert J. 
Kluge, Fred 

Chas. M. 
Kiepper, T. 
Korllz, Jack 
Kraus. Jack 
Lange. Max 
Larson, Chris 
Lackey, Chas. H. 

M. 
Marshall. John 

M.i Son iii. 1 lonald E. 



Mori, 11. A. 
McCormtck. Harold 

\v. 
McDonald. James 
Martin, Charles 
Mallkoff, Peter 
Meyer, Robert 
Morey, Art J. 
Marklm, Bernard 
Mackway. George 
Nllsson, Kmil 
Neuman, Win. 
Nasu. B. 
Neuman, Alex 
Neuman. John C 
Norgaard. Hf-nrv 
Olsen. Sverri ES, 
Olson, John A. 
Pedersen, Andreas 

I'ilags, John 

rsen, Frank M. 
Po| e. Kelt 

Rier, I 

Rolfsen, Rolf 
Rengsdorf. W. 
Spencer, Torn 
Saalman, Jo 
Stretton. M. 
Skartland. Gunnar 
Stercnle, Jack 
Sullivan. John 

Story, E. a. 

is. 1 i. A. 

Sul.. 

Spen f, l <i 
Schroder, B. 
Svendy, Bmil 

Scubber, Hans 
Sibley. Milton 
Tuomlnen, Nil i 

Tensfeldt, John S. 

Thornquist, Adoli 
Veits. Clayton 1. 
Wilson. J. W. 

Wezwager, Andrew 

Weber. Fred C. 
Westley, W. E. 
Walter, E. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Wltravamen, Geo. 
Wamick, A. IX 
Walters, Fred L. 
Wohn, Otje 
Wolff, Herbert 
Wood, E. E. 
White. William 
Wortanen, Frans 
Willev, Edward 
York, Chas. E. 
PACKAGES 
Adams, H. C. 
Heaps, James 
La Born, Roy 
Okasskl, Welling- 
ton 
Pcarthland, Gunnar 
Williams. Edward 



Mrs. Margareth Watson is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
husband, John Watson, who left 
Seattle on board the S. S. "Jadden,' - 
and was then heard from in June, 
1920 on board the S. S. "Quaker 
City," at Philadelphia. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts, kindly 
communicate with his wife at 3420 
Thirty-ninth avenue S. W., Seattle. 
Wash. 6-22-21 



J. Latvala is anxious to ascertain 
the whereabouts of Arne Wartiaincn, 
a native of Finland. Anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts, kindly commu- 
nicate with the above named at 
Box 306, R. F. D. 2, Kirkland, Wash. 

4-20-21 



Fred Klein, who left New Orleans 
on the S. S. "Lake Ferona" in 
March, 1920, is inquired for by his 
father, L. Klein. Address, care the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion, 543 Bienville Street, New 
Orleans, La. Charles Thoresen. 
Agent. 



Anyone knowing how F.ugene Mc- 
Nulty, coalpasser, met his death re- 
cently at Boat Harbor, Newport 
News, Va., while employed on S. S. 
"Co'quit," will confer a favor on his 
mother, Mrs. Frances McNulty, 511 
Hemlock street, Scranton, Pa., or 
Silas B. Axtell, 9 State street, New 
York City, by communicating with 
either one. 



ALBERT MICHELSON, Attor- 
ney-at-law; attorney for Marine 
Firemen & Watertenders' Union; 
Admiralty law a specialty. 676 Mills 
Bldg., Telephone Douglas 1058. Resi- 
dence Phone Prospect 2908. 



Anyone knowing the "whereabouts 
of William Peterson, born in Nor- 
way, last heard of in Bayonne, N. J., 
when he quit the S. S. "Gulfland" on 
N'ovember 11, 1918; is requested to 
communicate with Joseph A. Moran, 
43 Ship street, or John Ward, 489 
Fddy street, Providence, R. I. 

4-27-21 



Judge Dooling has decided to hear 
testimony in order to determine it 
Alt. Andersen was fairly treated when 
In-, as a member of the "Clareniont." 
.1 a release foi his share 

for the salvage of the S. S. "Solano." 
The report is that tin- captain was 
paid $300. Hnts off for the captain. 
S. T. Hogevoll, Pacific Building, San 
Francisco. 10-12-21 

STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP. 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION, 
ETC.. REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF 
CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912. 

of The Seamen's Journal, published 
weekly at San Francisco, Cal., for 

r 1. 1921 : 

stai«> of California, 
County of San Fran. 

Notary Public in and for 
-mi,- an. I county aforesaid, person- 
ally appeared s. a. Silver, who. having 
been duly sworn according to law 
that In- is the Busl 
i -| he Be man's Journal, and 
.Mowing is. to | 1 hi* 

knowledge and belief, a true statement 
of the ownership, management (and it « 
daily paper, the circulation), etc., "t 
the publication for the date 

shown in iii.- above caption, required by 
us) 24, 1912, embodied In 
Section 143, Postal Laws and Hernia- 
tions, printed on the reverse of this 
form, to wit: 

l. That the names and addresses oi 

the publisher, e.m.. iglng editor, 

business m 
Xa ..f Postoffice Addn 

Publisher, Sailors' Union of U 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Bditor, J. Vance Thompson, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal, 

Managing Editor, n 

ess Manager, S. A. Silver. San 
Francisco, 
g, | owners are: (Give names 

and addresses of Indlvidu rs. or, 

if a corporation, give its name and 
names an. I addresses of stockh 
owning or holding 1 her cent or more 
of the total amount of stock.) 

Sailors' I'nion of the Pacific, San 

Fran. is. o; not a corporation. Principal 

Sailors' Union: Andrew 

, FYanclsco; R. 

[ngwardsen, Assistant s.-. retary, San 

Francisco. 

II. at the known bondholders, mort- 

;, and other security holders own- 

i holding l per cent or more of 

total amount of bonds, mortgages, or 

other securities are: (If there are none. 

so state.) 

Nolle. 

4. That the two paragraphs next 

above, giving the names of ti 

stockholders, ami security holders, if 
any, contain not only the list of stock- 
holders and security holders as they ap- 

upon the i ks of the company 

es where the stockholder 
..r security holder appears upon the 

i ks of the company as tru 

any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person i 'ion for whom 

such trustee is acting, is given; 
that the said two paragraphs contain 
statements i n affiant's full 

know i n urn- 

stances and conditions under whi ll 

stockholders and security holders who 
books ol 

iany as trustees, hold stork and 

lea in a capacity ol her than t hat 

of a bona tide owner; and this affiant 

has no reason to thai any other 

i. association, or corporation has 

inv interest direct or indirect In the 

said stock, bonds, or other securities 

than as 80 stated hy him. 

s. A. SILVER, Business Man 
Sworn to and subscribed before me 
i his 30th das ol September, 1921. 
(Seal) KAV s. FEDER 

mission ■ tcplri a Aug. 19, i 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



lllllll!!lllllllllll!llllllll!llllllllll!lllll!lllll!lllllli!!IB 







Landis' Wage Award Won't Build Homes 

Judge Landis' wage award that cuts 
rates in the Chicago building industry will 
not result in home building, writes George 
W. Perkins, editor of the Cigar Makers' 
official journal. 

"Opinions as to the reduction in cost of 
production vary," says the trade unionist. 
"Labor officials say that it is approxi- 
mately 4 per cent, while some employers 
claim that it will amount to not less than 
6 per cent. Taking 5 per cent as an 
average, we find that a house costing 
$7000 under the old scale will cost .$6850 
under the Landis decision. Not so much 
of a difference as you were led to believe 
bv the labor-hating press that has at all 
times placed the blame for the housing 
shortage on the backs of building trades 
unions. 

"Now let us see where the real cost of 
production lies. The material for an ordi- 
nary bath room in 1914 cost less than $200. 
Todav the same material costs from $650 
to $675, hence we find that regardless of 
the labor cost the material cost alone on 
the one room of the house, the ordinary 
bath room, has advanced some $450 or 
more. 

"This rank profiteering in material cost 
goes clear through construction, be it 
frame, brick or stucco, and this extortion 
is the heart of the whole situation in the 
building industry. It is this extortion 
that raises our rent to the point where we 
must necessarilv pinch on our allowance 
for food, clothing and everything else that 
we need in order that we may provide 
shelter from the elements. 

"Labor may be 'readjusted' — so far that 
is all that has been seriously attempted— 
and labor may loyally carry out their part 
of the 'readjustment,' but unless capital 
honestly co-operates neither the building 
industry nor any other industry will re- 
vive as it should. The exacting of war- 
time profits by combinations and agree- 
ments among those who control industry 
is a crime against the millions who suffer 
and who must abide by wage cuts and un- 
employment. 

"We are anxiously awaiting some deci- 
sion from some one, some where, that will 
reduce something besides wages, which are 
not now and never have been anywhere 
near the actual cost of living." 



Anti-Union Coal Men Want Govern- 
ment Aid 

"The coal owners' request that Federal 
Judge Anderson enjoin the United Mine 
Workers from attempting to unionize 
Mingo count}- is logical," said Frank Mor- 
rison, A. F. of L. secretary, in a state- 
ment on the latest move of the AYcst Vir- 
ginia anti-union coal owners. 

"These coal owners find that the West 
Virginia State Government is not strong 
enough to aid them in their peonage pur- 
pose so they appeal to a Federal injunc- 
tion judge. 

"The coal owners plead that that the 
Miners' Union is an 'unlawful combina- 
tion.' This hackneyed phrase is always 
used by anti-unionists when they attempt 



to deny employes the right to organize, or 
reduce wages or enforce onerous working 
conditions. 

"The West Virginia situation can not 
be cleared up by an injunction judge, no 
more than it can be by gunmen and thug, 
government. The only remedy is the 
widest publicity. 

"The coal owners' attitude toward pub- 
licity is indicated by the recent statement 
in the public press that they asked the 
United States Senate Investigating Com- 
mittee to defer a probe while a trial in 
Mingo county is on. The miners objected 
to this procedure. 

"These methods will not bring peace in 
West Virginia, and I hope that Judge 
Anderson will for once forego taking over 
the duties of the law-making and law- 
enforcing departments of government and 
notify these coal owners that they aban- 
don using a State Government for their 
anti-union purpose and permit the West 
Virginia government to function." 



Regulate Child Labor 
New regulations announced by the State 
of North Carolina Child Welfare Commis- 
sion prohibit the employment of children 
under sixteen years before 6 o'clock in the 
morning and after 9 o'clock at night. No 
child under fourteen years of age shall be 
employed more than eight hours a day. 
Farming and domestic work is not in- 
cluded in the regulations. No girl under 
fourteen years of age shall be permitted to 
work in any of the prohibited occupa- 
tions. 

"The reason for this," says the commis- 
sion, "is that if the womanhood of the 
future, girls of tender age certainly cannot 
State is to be properly conserved in the 
be allowed to run the dangers of associa- 
tion inherent in employment in public 
places." 

Boys between twelve and fourteen years 
may be employed when public school is 
not in session. 



Labor Board Wrecked 

With the dismissal of its secretary the 
Labor Department of the State of Kansas 
has been wrecked by Governor Allen. 
The last wreath will be placed on the 
remains when the assistant secretary of 
the Kansas Employers' Association, now 
called the Associated Industries of Kansas, 
is appointed secretary of the labor depart- 
ment. 

"With no department of the State to 
insist on the enforcement of the splendid 
laws that have been secured by organized 
effort on the part of the workers," says the 
Kansas Trades Unionist, "there is but one 
hope open to the Kansas workers, and 
that is to organize thoroughly into the 
unions, bury partisan prejudices and go 
into the next political campaign deter- 
mined to rout the machine that has played 
into the hands of those who have placed 
the dollar before human life and the wel- 
fare of the working people." 



S. T. Hogevoll, Admiralty Lavyer, Seamen's 
cases a specialty. Sixth floor, Pacific Bldg., 
Fourth and Market StS., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1880.— Adv. 



inn 

I Internationa! Seamen's Union 
©f America 

^HiiHinMiiiiininLiiiniimiiiiiiiiiniiiiHiiiiiiiiMnnninuiiiiiNfti'iiiMiiMiiiMniiMriiinniiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiMMiinuniinnmmmH 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street, Chicago. III. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1% Lewis Street 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 67-69 Front Street 

BALTIMORE, Md C. RASMUSSEN. Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

13 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON. Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60% Saint Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La CHARLES THORSEN, Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex SAM HALL, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

CAI.VESTON, Tex L. LARSEN. Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHARLES MARTELL, Agent 

369 South Main Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN. Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R, J. LEWIS. Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEON W. MENDEL, Agent 

707 Palafox Street 

TAMPA, Fla C. F. BIGELOW, Agent 

205 Polk Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C ERNEST H. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 

MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowline- Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

NEW -XORK, N. Y D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

411 Union Street 

BALTIMORE, Md H. MEYERS, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK NOLAN, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

413% Twenty-first Street 

MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH, Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y E. DITTMER, Agent 

296 Van Brunt Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA JAMES J. FUREY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md ..PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

804 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va SAMUEL PORTER, Agent 

32 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex F. J. JOHNSON, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. KOMISKIE, Agent 

2306 Post Office Street. Ave. E. 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

288 State Street 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP. Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS. La DAN LYONS, Agent 

541 Toulouse Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. McCABE, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I HARRY RIDLEY, Agent 

296 Eddy Street 

SAVANNAH, Ga GEORGE McMURDO, Agent 

103 West Bay Street 

CHARLESTON, S. C WM. II. WILSON, Agent 

6 Cove Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary 
Branches: 

GLOUCESTER. Mass NEWMAN SHEA, Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES J. FAGAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

H. ESKIN, Secretary 

HOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 

EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
NEW HAVE7N. Conn _ 13% Collie Street 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



jflilillll ::i ! iiill[|| 

Tlhie SeEunmeira i> s Jowrsial j 

Published Weekly at San Francisco 
by THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



J. VANCE THOMPSON Editor 

8. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.50 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office, Martime Hall Bldg., 

5J Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Franctsco PostofTice as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of 
October 3. 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1921. 



MOVIE SHIPS AX I) S.\II.( >RS 



For some time past a number <>f uptown, 
well-dressed individuals have been invading 
tlir most exclusive precincts of the water- 
front in search of model sailing ships. All 
the old landmarks have been given the 
double O and quite a few of the most 
perfect specimens of sailor jackknife in- 
dustry have disappeared from their old- 
time surroundings. 

.Many of the regulars have wondered at 
this sudden display of interest in minia- 
tures of full-riggers, harks and schooners. 
Recently one of them learned that they 
are used in the moving picture business, 
where, by some legerdemain of camera 
work, they can he made to take the place 
of the real article. 

* * * 

Times are hard and wages are low in 
the calling of the sea these days; therefore, 
when a movie promoter seeks local color 
along the waterfront, he is seldom cli s 
appointed. 

Recently one of our comrades, who 
sports a luxuriant growth of whiskers, 
was hired for the purpose of filling out a 
pirate scene. In this instance, his hirsute 
adornment, which is of a belligerent as- 
pect, was quite an asset ; all of which re- 
minds us that the days of the old pictur- 
esque sailor are no more. 

The times are still within the memory 
of some, when hard-case, deep-water sail- 
ors were common along the' waterfront of 
San Francisco. Shanghai Brown, Johnny 
Curtin, Shanghai Nielsen, and others of 
their ilk did a thriving business in those 
days. Many of their boarders were of the 
Western Ocean packet-rat type. They 
had run the gamut of all that could be 
regarded as hard experience. 

Starting out in life from some European 
port with a hook-can. sheave-knife, dun- 
garees and slicker, they were capable emu- 
lators of the renowned "Garry Owen." 
Beach-combing in all the ports of the 
seven seas; robbed, beaten and shanghaied, 
they became veritable drifters, fit for any 
quality of undertaking. In those days it 
was common practice, especially among 



certain mates and skippers who desired to 
be conspicuous as real hard cases, to raise 
an extensive punch-mat around their jowls. 
These bristling adornments were calculated 
to inspire respect within the minds of the 
most gullible, and when reinforced by a 
substantial growth of hair on chest and 
arms and a vocabulary strong as sulphur, 
the prerequisite for recognition as a hard- 
case was complete. 

All of which again reminds us that the 
onward march of civilization continues to 
take all the joy out of life for some men. 
The only place nowadays in which the old 
time sailing vessel and the hard-case sailor 
can be seen is in the movies. 



PASSING THE BUCK 



In their attempt to obtain a strangle- 
hold upon every possible share of stock, 
every available bond, and as much of the 
people's savings as could be squeezed out 
of them, "big business" has been, to a 
great degree, responsible for the creation 
of an unemployment problem, particularly 
in the United States, which threatens to 
assume serious proportions. Not being 
desirous of having this lusty infant howl- 
ing on their own doorstep, "big biz" 
passed the buck to their Palm Reach ad- 
ministration. At first sight this might ap- 
pear to be placing the latter in an em- 
barrassing position, and so it would be if 
the problem had to be solved. 

But all administrations are resourceful, 
so an unemploymenl conference was called 
and the buck passed on to them, which 
leaves plenty of time for yachting and 
golf. 

The conference, composed of the most 
promising leading lights, could be expected 
to meet the emergency, and so they did. 

They passed the buck to the sev cral 
State governments, so that instead of one 
body carrying the burden it rested heavily 
upon the devoted shoulders of numerous 
Governors. Were they eager to take this 
waif into the center of their respective 
homes? Not so that anybody could notice 
it! The buck was shunted gently on to 
the Mayors of the various cities. 

Xow. Mayors are only human, and also 
politicians, so why should their equanim- 
ity be disturbed with a matter that greater 
heads showed a disinclination to tackle. 
Therefore, the tantalizing problem passes 
on, in turn, to Aldermen, social service 
institutions, comfortable citizens, and 
finally back to the unemployed, and there 
you have it, there it rests. 

Moral: Palm Reach is no Elysium for 
out-of-works. 



BRITISH SEAMEN IDI.I". 



The latest issue of the Labor Gazette 
(British) shows that the world's shipping 
slum]) is causing considerable un employ- 
men among British seamen, although 
not quite as severe as in the United 
States. The Gazette states: 

"Employment among seamen during 
August was generally slack, but showed, 
on the whole, a slight improvement as 
compared with the previous month. Many 

ships continued to be laid up at the ports, 
and there were in all districts large sur- 
pluses of ratings for whom no engage- 
ments were available. 



"The percentage of seamen unemployed, 
as indicated by the unemployment books 
lodged at Employment Exchanges, was 
21.1 on August 26 as compared with 26.8 
on July 26. 

"On the Thames the demand was slack 
for the first half of the month, and declined 
again at the end after an improvement in 
the third week: a considerable number of 
men were unable to obtain berths. 

"Employment on the Tyne was moder- 
ate during the month, and a large number 
of men were unemployed. On the Tees 
the demand for seamen was very small, 
the inactivity being ascribed to the high 
cost of bunkers. There was also consider- 
able stagnation on the Wear. 

"At Hull employment was slack, a re- 
vival in the middle of the month being fol- 
lowed by a decline. At Grimsby the de- 
mand for men continued to be insignifi- 
cant. 

"Employment at Southampton was mod- 
erate; many of those who signed on were 
re-engagements, and the number of un- 
employed remained large. 

"At Bristol the demand was poor and 
declined at the end of the month, but at 
Avonniouth employment showed some im- 
provement, though it was still only moder- 
ate on the whole. 

"There was considerable unemployment 
at the South Wales ports. At Cardiff and 
Newport employment was dull for the 
greater part of the month, with a tempo- 
rary improvement during the middle 
period. 

"In the foreign-going trade at Liverpool 
a moderate demand in the first week was 
succeeded by a decline, but at the end of 
the month conditions were somewhat 
better. 

"On the Clyde employment, which 
varied from fair to moderate in the fust 
two weeks, declined considerably in tin- 
third week, but afterwards showed some 
revival: a large number of men. however. 
were unable to obtain employment. At 
Dundee and Leith employment, after being 
very slack, showed a slight improvement 
at the end of the month. 

"At Belfast an improvement was re- 
corded in the middle of the month, but it 
was not maintained, and employment at 
the end of the month was described as 
dull." 



ALASKA TIME DOES NOT COUNT 



'flie Seamen's Act does not contemplate 
fishing fleet trips as service in the United 

States merchant marine, according to Fed- 
eral Judge Maurice T. Dooling, who re- 
cently ruled that the application for 
naturalization of Peter Gustave Hoffman 

should be made under the regular naturali- 
zation laws. Judge Pooling's decision is 
of considerable importance to seamen and 
Alaska fishermen who sail annually out of 
San Francisco on merchant vessels or who 
are attached to the Alaskan fishing tleets. 
Hoffman recently returned from Alaska 
on one- of the fishing vessels. He applied 
for naturalization a year ago under the 
provisions of the Seamen's Act. 



Carelessness .aboard ship is criminal. It 
is better to In- tired than to have the 
morgue wagon call for the remains of 
vourself or comrade. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



A REASON FOR LABOR DAILIES 



The following from a recent issue of the 
Australian Worker applies with equal force 
to the situation in the United States : 

"The London daily press of January 23 
last published an account of a meeting of 
international bankers, where it was de- 
cided that wages must come down, and 
that the way to bring them down was to 
paralyze industry by refusing credits, com- 
pelling employers to throw the workers on 
the streets for a spell of unemployment. 

"After a systematic period of hunger 
they, the workers, were to crawl back at 
lowered wages. 

To put the matter beyond all doubt, 
here is the actual statement in the London 
Daily Chronicle: 

Six months ago the big New York 
bankers, Otto Kahn, Pierpont Morgan, 
Schiff, and others, had a talk, and they 
decided that wages must come down. 

They discussed the situation with 
the banking mandarins on this side. 
Then began a campaign of calling in 
all credits, of refusing loans to com- 
mercial enterprises. The petrol was 
cut off, and the industrial machine be- 
gan to slow down. 

Securities began to diminish in 
value. There was a "slum])" in this 
country as well as in the States — in 
fact, all over the world. 

"We know that banks in this country, 
acting under instructions from their finan- 
cial bosses in London, have called in cred- 
its, and are refusing loans to commercial 
enterprises. We know that it is because 
of the carrying out of this scheme that 
tens of thousands of men arc unemployed 
in Australia at the present time. 

"We know also that not one capitalist 
newspaper in this country has dared to 
give a convincing reason for the indus- 
trial hold-up that is now taking place. The 
above little story in the London daily 
press, important as it is from a news point 
of view, was never published in one Aus- 
tralian capitalist newspaper. 

The people of Australia will never get 
news like this in the capitalist press. But 
when they get a daily Labor press of their 
own, with an all-Labor cable and news 
service, they will find that important mat- 
ters like the above, which concerns the 
welfare of every working man in the Com- 
monwealth, will be given full publicity. 

"Only then will the workeis get the 
chance to know what is really happening 
in the world." 

It has been painfully apparent to those 
of fine perception, that the present world- 
wide business stagnation is the result of 
capitalistic machinations. So carefully have 
the trails been covered, however, that the 
fulness of greed has not been disclosed. 

The values of securities in all commer- 
cial nations have been depressed to the 
lowest possible levels. Mills, mines and 
factories have been shut down and a gen- 
eral state of uncertainty prevails. The 
people of the nations generally have been 
subjected to a most ruthless squeezing 
process, which has brought about a three- 
fold result: 

First, loss to thousands of their savings. 

Second, the creation of more wage 
slaves. 

Third, the accumulation of the earth's 
wealth by a few powerful interests, which 
will be greatly enhanced when time for 
lifting the heel arrives. 



CONVENTION CALL 



To All District Unions of the International 

Seamen's Union of America. 
Greeting: 

The International Seamen's Union of 
America will hold its twenty-fifth annual 
convention in the City of Chicago, 111., be- 
ginning the second Monday in January, 
1922, at 10 a. m., and will continue in ses- 
sion from day to day until its business is 
completed. 

The importance of this convention de- 
mands that each District Union elect its 
most able, experienced and faithful repre- 
sentatives in order that the questions con- 
fronting the seamen may be dealt with 
and acted upon to the best interest of the 
seamen's movement. 

While the membership of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America has 
decreased during the past year, and each 
District Union has felt such a decrease 
financially, it is, nevertheless, expected 
that a full quota of delegates will be sent 
from each District Union. Those who 
have already elected delegates are re- 
quested to consider the matter, while 
those who have not are urged to bring 
this about. 

The unions of the Great Lakes District 
will make all arrangements for said con- 
vention and be prepared to meet the dele- 
gates and tender them every accommoda- 
tion necessary. 

Representation 

The following sections of the constitu- 
tion of the International Seamen's Union 
of America govern representation at the 
convention : 

ARTICLE III 

Section 2. Representation at the con- 
vention shall be based upon the average 
per capita tax paid during the year. Or- 
ganizations shall be entitled to one dele- 
gate for two hundred members or more, 
three delegates for five hundred or more 
and one delegate for each additional five 
hundred or majority fraction thereof. 

Section 3. Affiliated unions shall be en- 
titled to one vote for each one hundred 
members or majority fraction thereof. 
When more than one delegate represents 
an organization, the vote of their union 
shall be equally divided among such dele- 
gates. 

Section 4. Delegates shall have the 
same qualifications as the elective officers 
of the organization represented, provided 
no one shall be seated as a delegate in the 
convention who is delinquent in, or who 
has been expelled by any affiliated union ; 
nor shall anyone be qualified to act as a 
delegate who is also a member of any 
labor organization not affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America, 
etc. 

Credentials 

Duplicates of credentials should be 
mailed not later than December 1, 1921, 
to the International office in order that the 
Committee on Audit and Credentials, 
which meets prior to the convention, may 
have ample time to complete the work and 
be ready to submit its report when the 
convention is called to order. 

It is suggested that District Unions or 
delegates having matters they desire to 
submit to the convention will do so by for- 
warding copies of resolutions which they 



|iuiiiiiiiiin 

OFFICIAL, 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii™ 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 10, 1921. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Joseph Faltus presiding. The Quarterly 
Finance Committee reported the Union's account 
correct and the amount of cash in banks cor- 
responding with entries in the books. The 
closing of the Tacoma branch of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific was referred to a referen- 
dum vote to be taken on October 24. Donated 
$KK) to the miners on strike in the State of 
Washington. 

R. INGWARDSEN, 
Secretary pro tem. 
Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street. Phone 
Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C. October 3, 1921. 
Shipping and prospects dull. 

R. TOWNSEND, Agent. 
153 Cordova St. W., P. O. Box 571. Phone 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, October 3, 1921. 
Shipping fair. 

A. KLEMMSEN, Agent. 
2016 N. 30th Street. Phone Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, October 3, 1921. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Phone Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, October 3, 1921. 
Shipping in steam-schooners fair. 

CHAS. OLESEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 28. Phone Main 557. 



Portland Agency, October 3, 1921. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Phone Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, October 3, 1921. 
Shipping dull. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Phone 137-R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 26, 1921. 
Shipping picking up. 

WILLIAM HARDY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Phone 1930. 



DIED 

William Frascr, No. 915, a native of Scotland, 
age 57. Died at Victoria, B. C, October 6, 1921. 

Arend Goldstein, No. 1452, a native of Hol- 
land, age 26. Died at Port Costa, Calif., Sept. 
24, 1921. 

Fred Wiclke, No. 32, a native of Germany, 
age 55. Died at San Francisco, Calif., Decem- 
ber 31, 1920. 



desire to introduce to the International's 
secretary-treasurer at least two weeks in 
advance of the convention. 

You are respectfully requested to take 
up the matters herein referred to with 
your union so that the convention call 
may receive consideration by the largest 
number of members possible. 

With best wishes and kindest regards, 
I remain, 

Fraternally yours, 

T. A. HANSON, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 



The United States Bureau of Mines re- 
ports that June, 1921, mine fatalities were 
o| less, or about 20 per cent, than (lie 
corresponding mouth of 1920. The number 
kdled in June of this year was 155, as 
compared with 219 the previous June. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



PRESS FALSITY REVEALED 



The workers have been given examples of 
press unfairness so often, and for so Iohr, that 
they have finally accepted the situation as a 
matter of course. It is during times of a large 
or hitter industrial conflict, however, that the 
press is revealed at its worst. 

the recent marine lockout, with a 
few notable exceptions, the press placed the 
issue before the public in such manner as to 
conceal or misrepresent the workers' side of the 
question. 

Some id.ea of the manner in which these 
matters are accomplished and the reasons there- 
for can he gathered from the following: 

The Commission of Enquiry of tin- Inter- 
church World Movement has made public 
the final sections of its supplementary re- 
ports on the steel strike of 1919. 

The supplementary reports are being 
published d>y llareotirt, Brace & Com- 
pany) under the title "Public ( opinion and 
the Steel Strike" as a companion volume 
to the Commission's "Report on the Steel 
Strike." 

The report on the press analyzes the 400 
issues of the seven English-language dailies 
in Pittsburgh appearing during the first 
two months of the strike and concludes 
with comparisons between the general 
trends of the Pittsburgh papers and the 
trends of the press as a whole. 'The 400 
issues, the report finds, contained one 
example of first-hand investigation of con- 
ditions anion- the strikers by a Pittsburgh 
reporter. 

The report proceeds on the assumption 
that the Pittsburgh papers should have 
"covered the strike" as news of importance 
to the comunity and while the facts were 
in doubt should have printed statements 
from both sides. Instead the Pittsburgh 
papers presented but one side without any 
detail or prominence and their general 
attitude was represented in the statement, 
made to the invesigator by a Pittsburgh 
editor that the strike was a ticklish story 
and best let alone as much as possible. 
Open Season For I. W. W. 

The report quotes many headlines and 
stories from the Pittsburgh Gazette-Times. 
Chronicle-Telegraph, Post, Sun, Dispatch, 
Leader and 1'ress and notes some of the 
more obvious connections between their 
ownership and the industrial and financial 
interests. Xo one of the papers made a 
practice of "telling a different story" from 
the rest. None changed its policy adopted 
at the start in the light of any later in- 
vestigations or protests. Even when the 
editors believed the facts to be different 
from what they printed no change was 
made in regard either to particular stories 
or general policy. The Post, for example, 
printed (December 10) a front page story 
of two bank robbers killed and asserted 
that tin- robbery "had its origin in the big 
steel strike and was hatched in the head- 
quarters of the 1. W. W. and reds in 
Monessen," by strikers. Two editors of 
the Tost told the investigator that a de- 
tective fan undercover man anion"; the 
strikers) brought them the story, that they 
did not believe that the 1. W. \Y. had 
anything to do with the robbery, that they 
knew there was no 1. \\ . W. headquarters 
in Monessen, but that printing the story 
would not hurt the dead robbers nor the 
detectives and as for the I. W. \\ '.. "that 
organization is in disrepute any way." 
Advertising Pays 

Concerning the policy of all the Pitts- 
burgh papers the report says: 

"On September 27, the fifth day of the 



strike, an advertising campaign was be- 

gun to induce the striking steel workers 
to abandon their protest. While the ad- 
vertisements were apparently intended for 
the strikers themselves, they had, unques- 
tionably, by reason of their prominence, 
an important influence in forming public 
opinion on the causes and issues of the 
strike. Between September 27 and ( Ictober 
S over thirty full-page advertisements, de- 
nouncing the leadership of the strike and 
calculated to undermine the morale of the 
strikers, appeared in the various Pitts- 
burgh newspapers. They were printed in 
English and generally in four or five 
foreign languages as well. In sum, the 
purport of these advertisements was that 
it was un-American for the steel workers 
to be on strike. 

"These advertisements, obviously pre- 
pared by competent professional skill, were 
carefully designed and were characterized 
by an effective display. A number of them 
contained a half-page cartoon of 'Uncle 
Sam,' garbed in stars and stripes, with his 
hand to his mouth, cabling in the direction 
id* steel mills pictured in the background: 
'Go back to work!' This exhortation was 
printed in eight languages. The page-wide 
streamer line in heavy black type at the 
top read: 'America is calling you!' 'flic 
line at the bottom read: 'Co back to 
work!' All of the advertisements were 
characterized by a similar elVectivem 
presenting the point of view of those wdio 
paid for this costly method of reaching the 
strikers and public opinion. 

"Coming as early in the strike as they 
did. these advertisements constitute a 
factor of considerable importance. They 
are worth attention, especially from two 
points of view: first, they represent in 
crystallized form the misinformation con- 
cerning the strike which was persistently 
circulated in the news columns of the 
Pittsburgh press and elsewhere: second, 
the point of view taken in these advertise- 
ments was exactly the point of view which 
dominated the news and editorial columns 
of the Pittsburgh papers from the be- 
ginning to the end of the strike, and it 
should be borne in mind that no Pitts- 
burgh papers pretended to offer at any 
time a consistent and thorough examina- 
tion of the causes of the strike from any 
other point of view." 

News Was Garbled 

'fhe report finds that the newspapers 
were childly responsible for the current 
belief in Pittsburgh that the strike was 
"revolutionary," "un-American." and "Bol- 
shevik." The steel companies distributed 
specially reprinted copies of Foster's "re- 
pudiated" booklet on syndicalism but the 
chief distribution of excerpts from the 
booklet was through the newspapers. 
These extracts took the place of actual 
detailed news on the extent of the strike. 
It was the practice to omit or to "bury" 
the strike committee's figures of the num- 
ber on strike. An article in the Chronicle- 
Telegraph (October 1) was a marked 
exception under the headline "Strike 
Crumbling-. Steel Men Say." It did add a 
paragraph on a strike bulletin claiming 
men out. 'fhe original bulletin as 
handed to the newspapers itemized the 
claims town by town. When the strike 
was two months old some newspapers did 
print an estimate of totals made by a news 
bureau from company sources which con- 



firmed the strikers' original estimates, 'fhe 
estimates headlined by the newspapers 
uniformly belittled the extent of the strike. 
Two days after the strike started (Septem- 
ber 24) the display headline of the Leader 
ran "Pittsburgh Mills Running bull: Union 
Men Meet." 'fhe story contained no such 
statement and the mills were not "running 
full" six weeks later, 'fhe persistence with 
which such practices were followed is il- 
lustrated by the following when the strike 
was nearly two months old: 

Misrepresentation Is Easy 
"< Mi November 12 the Cambria Steel 
Company posted notices that the plant at 
Johnstown would resume operations the 
following Mon, lay. Some of the news- 
papers printed the information that 7000 
men had registered their willingness to go 
back to work.' ( )n November 17 articles 
to the effect that the strike had collapsed 
in Johnstown appeared in most of the 
Pittsburgh newspapers under such head- 
lines as these: Post -'Cambria Steel Mills 
Resume Today, Over 7000 Men Returning-.' 
(This article was from Johnstown, dated 
November 16, when the mills had not 
yet opened, i Chronicle - Telegraph — '81 H ,: I 
Johnstown Steel Strikers Return to Work.' 
Sun— '8000 Men Back at Cambria Mill 
Jobs.' Press— '8000 Strikers Return to 
Work in Johnstown Steel Mills.' On 
November L9 the Post printed another 
article on the Johnstown situation with 
this headline, '10,000 Cambria Steel Men 

Return.' 

"'fhe whistles of the Cambria steel mills 
did blow on November 17 for tin- first 
time since September 22. An investigator 
participated in the count of men returning 
to work." 

'fhe report details the actual count, 
which was 600 men at work in the Cambria 
plants, 'fhe workers considered the long 
attempts of minimizing the number out as 
strikebreaking- by the press. 

Insidious Propaganda 

Stories and pronouncements calling the 
strike "alien." and demanding the "curb- 
ing" or "deportation" of aliens were 
featured. The Leader's editorial (October 
31) was typical both of editorial view and 
news treatment. It contained such sen- 
tences as: "It would be criminal to con- 
ceal the deadly peril of the nation 

The labor strikes, existing- and to come, 
are not ordinary labor disputes." Early in 
the strike the Chronicle-Telegraph and the 
Gazette-Times even charged that the strike 
was pro-German in origin. They put on 
the front page stories that "numerous steel 
men'' asserted that the strike was started 
by Germany. "Inspired Walkout to Regain 
Trade, Steel Men Say," was a first page 
headline. 

Workers Have Many Grievances 

'fhe report says : 

"'fhe most casual inquiry would have 
sufficed to develop the fact that the steel 
workers felt that they had actual griev- 
; that they complained of the condi- 
tions tinder which they had to live and 
that many of them were living in con- 
gested and intolerable surroundings: that 
for the most part they were working" ten 
to fourteen hours, many of them with a 
twenty-four hour shift every fortnight, 
while many worked seven days in the 
week. It would have been found, too, that 
while most of the strikers knew little or 
nothing of any particular economic the- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ories, some of the more intelligent were 
expressing anxiety for improved condi- 
tions in order that they might have more 
time for home life, and might avail them- 
selves of opportunities for night school- 
ing and the education required to become 
real American citizens. 

"During the strike the newspapers 
printed a few statistical items on the 
wages of steel workers, generally after 
their publication in other cities. The 
statistics quoted always omitted compari- 
sons of steel workers' incomes with stand- 
ards of living, whether a minimum stand- 
ard of an 'American' standard. Moreover, 
such statistics were generally those com- 
piled by bodies connected with employers' 
organizations. (The fact that the strikers' 
leaders had no statistical information what- 
ever on wages and hours did not induce 
the newspaper to compile them for the in- 
formation of the community.) 

"Without a single exception worthy of 
note, the statements, demands, grievances 
and testimony from the side of the strikers 
were printed under headlines or in a con- 
text tending to give the impression that 
what the striking steel workers sought was 
something unwarranted and that their 
grievances were unfounded." 

Worker's Cause Suppressed 

When news developments were unques- 
tionably favorable to the strikers — such 
as the sessions of the Senate investigating 
committee in Pittsburgh, at which steel 
workers and their leaders gave rather 
dramatic testimony — the Pittsburgh news- 
papers reported the hearings under such 
headlines as "McKellar Scores Chiefs for 
Not Delaying Strike" (Leader); "Steel 
Strike Preventable, Senators Hear; Walk- 
out in Opposition to President's Wish, 
Witnesses on Local Probe Say" (Gazette- 
Times). What the worker-witnesses actu- 
ally said was briefly summarized and 
"buried" in the stories. 

The report finds that the newspapers' 
suppression or omissions of the facts re- 
garding the abrogation of the rights of 
assembly in Alleghany County were the 
principal means of maintaining such 
policies. Four specific examples are given 
of press partiality or suppression of news 
of protests against interference with civil 
rights. The real news included a delega- 
tion going to Washington to protest and 
a special convention of the Pennsylvania 
State Federation of Labor in Pittsburgh ; 
one was totally suppressed, the other 
(which was printed on the front pages 
of New York newspapers), was mentioned 
by two Pittsburgh papers, one on page (>, 
the other on page 9. 

Cossack Assassins 

Killings by State or local police were 
reported as "riots" for which the victims 
were blamed. The report contrasts, in 
three cases, the accounts in the Pittsburgh 
papers with the signed statements given 
to investigators by eye-witnesses. One 
was the killing of Nick Gratichini at Far- 
rell on September 23 by State constabu- 
lary troopers. According to witnesses, the 
striker was in his own yard with a baby 
on his knee when killed. The Chronicle- 
Telegraph (September 25) printed a stor) 
"according to the State troopers" that 
Gratichini was skillfully picked off by the 
troopers while "sniping." Another was the 
shooting of two strikers by negro strike- 
breakers at Donora on October 9. The 



signed statements of eye-witnesses asserted 
that the shooting was unprovoked and 
that a wounded striker was arrested and 
jailed without a formal charge against 
him. The account given by the Leader 
called the affair a battle, made no mention 
of the negroes doing - the shooting, and 
praised the constabulary for maintaining 
order. In a third case the Press (Septem- 
ber 30) printed a laudatory story of the 
maimer in which a State trooper killed 
a striker, described as a sniper, by firing 
at the "flame of the hidden sniper's re- 
volver." The statements of two witnesses 
detailed how the victim, a striker stand- 
ing on a street corner, was killed by a 
stray bullet during a foray by State 
troopers, during which another bystander, 
a woman, was wounded. 

The lone specimen of first-hand investi- 
gation in the 400 issues of a Pittsburgh 
paper concerned police outrages on for- 
eigners. It appeared in the Press on 
October 8 and the reporter described her 
own observations as "startling." Neither 
the Press nor any other paper printed 
another story of the kind. 

Press Against Public Interest 

The report, after citing many excerpts, 
finds that the Pittsburgh papers were not 
only a failure as a public institution dur- 
ing the strike but committed overt acts of 
support for policies which were against 
the public interest. The report then shows 
the differences between the Pittsburgh 
papers and the trend of the rest of the 
country's press and finds the similarities 
more noteworthy than the differences. 
Despite certain exceptions, which are cited, 
the report finds that "the news in most 
other papers was of the same general 
type" as in the Pittsburgh papers. "The 
Pittsburgh newspapers were simply a more 
emphatic example of policies which con- 
vince labor that the press is unfair to 
labor during a strike." Immediately after 
the strike labor unions founded their own 
national news agency. 



SHIPPING BOARD VESSELS ONE- 
THIRD JUNK 



Chairman Lasker of the United States 
Shipping Board, in reviewing the work ac- 
complished since the organization of the 
Board, recently made public the follow- 
ing statements: "These sixteen weeks have 
accomplished only a mere beginning, but 
a real beginning. In June last the over- 
head shore organization of the board 
and the Emergency Fleet Corporation con- 
sisted of some 8300 people, at an annual 
salary expense of nearly $16,000,000. 

"The new board found no financial state- 
ments of the condition of the board, either 
as to capital expenditures or operating 
history, which any business or business 
man could use as a guide. 

"The American nation today is in pos- 
session of 1450 ocean-going steel ships of 
approximately 10,500,000 deadweight tons, 
not to mention ten ferroconcrete vessels 
of over 60,000 tons, and a wooden licet of 
2S5 ships of 1,000,000 deadweight tons. The 
concrete and wooden ships will be eradi- 
cated. 

"Of these, nearly 1500 steel steamers, 
we may say, in round figures, that one- 
third of the number, comprising nearly 
one-half of the tonnage in deadweight, 
are excellent commercial vessels, one-third 



are fair commercial vessels, and the bal- 
ance, for all practical purposes, are a total 
loss save for what salvage can be gotten 
out of them through ultimate sale or 
conversion, either in this country or 
abroad. 

"The cost of the construction of this 
fleet and its operation up to the present 
time is about $3,500,000,000, the total ex- 
penditure for all purposes. If the whole 
$3,500,000,000 were written off today and 
the fleet carried as a total loss, this greatest 
of the Government's war operations would 
not owe the American people one penny. 
In bringing the war to its successful con- 
clusion none of the major factors counted 
more than the Government's fleet. 

"The fleet, under the control of the 
Shipping Board, which has been built and 
operated at a cost to the Government's 
treasury of $3,500,000,000, will no longer 
be an irksome burden to the taxpayer. The 
building program is practically finished. 
( >nly such ships are being completed as 
are cheaper to finish than to scrap. The 
$2.-1,000.000 appropriation from Congress, 
with possibly $5,000,000 more, will, by the 
end of this year, see the last of the Gov- 
ernment-owned fleet ready for operation. 

"The best estimate available today shows 
that in 1921, in tons of ocean freight, per- 
haps 60 per cent as much is moving as in 
1913. Granting the premise that the last 
10 or 15 per cent of trade makes or de- 
moralizes the market, the possible 40 per 
cent deficit in ocean trade existing today 
eloquently speaks for itself. 

"Because of the existing excess of ton- 
nage the values of bottoms have so 
dropped that time charters today are one- 
eighth of the going rates in the third 
quarter of 1919. A 10,000-ton steamer can 
be had under charter hire for a little over 
$11,000 per month, as against $100,000 
when charter hire was at its height. In 
the face of these low rates the American 
owner finds himself confronted by the 
keenest of foreign competition, with the 
handicaps of higher wages, expensive 
victualing and severe legislative require- 
ments. 

"The Merchant Marine Act of 1920, gen- 
erally known as the Jones Bill, has as its 
preamble a Magna Charta for America on 
the seas unsurpassed in the annals of our 
country's legislation." 



MINERS BLOCK EVICTION 



Superior Court Judge Hall of Seattle 
has blocked the attempt of the Pacific 
Coast Coal Company to evict miners from 
company houses. The company is the 
largest concern of its kind in the State. 
Its employes, together with other miners, 
have been forced on strike against a wage 
cut, despite an award by a Government 
commission that does not expire until 
next April. 

fudge Hall ruled that the eviction no- 
tices were not legally prepared. Tin 
Court ordered that bonds put up by the 
Miners' Union be returned. 

The company will have to start all over 
again in its eviction campaign, and this 
will consume several weeks. 

Trade unionists declare that the em- 
ployers' violation of the Government 
award will not be forgotten. 



Attend your Union meetings. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



AMERICAN LABOR MOVEMENT 



fudging from a recent issue of the Social 
Service Bulletin, the publishers arc not 
altogether in sympathy with the policies 
of the American Federation of Labor. The 
Bulletin, however, contains certain in- 
formaton which might be of value to 
unionists, as follows: 

Industrial Unionism 

Old craft line divisions have been gradu- 
ally giving way to broader organization. 
The following art- well-developed example* 
of industrial unionism, a type of organiza- 
tion which takes in workers of a given 
industry on a broader scale than is pos- 
sible within traditional trade onion limits. 

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of 
America, covering workers on men's and 
boys' clothing. Organized in 1914 as a 
secessionist movement from the United 
Garment Worker-, American Federation 
of I.ahor refused to recognize it. but it is 
now one of the most powerful sections 
of the working class movement outside its 

ranks. It embraces at the lowest estimate 
83 per cent of the workers in the industry. 
Within six years has extended its juris- 
diction and influence throughout the Uni- 
ted States and Canada, and built up an 
organization of close to 200,000 members, 
embracing a score of nationalities. Mas 
achieved the 44-hour week for workers 
formerly sweated 70 and SO hours: has de- 
veloped the best machinery existing in this 
country for the settlement of industrial 
disputes; established eight newspapers; 
adopted an educational program; raised 
wages 100 per cent; co-operated with 
Amalgamated Textile Union; contributed 
$100,000 to striking steel workers, and 
during recent lockout, extending from June 
to December, 1920, raised, according to 
statement of the president, Sidney Hill- 
man, $2,000,000. 

Concerning the 1920 convention of this 
organization, a writer says: "They had 
emerged from the sweated and exploited 
group . . . their whole economic position 
altered by organization ... so that then- 
was deep spiritual significance in the fact 
that the Symphony < >rchestra opened the 
convention, that flowers loaded the plat- 
form; that gifts were made to the officers. 
It was the people's way of saying: 'We 
can at last have the beautiful things of 
life from which we were so long ex- 
cluded.' " 

The Amalgamated Textile Workers of 
America: (Not affiliated with the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, i Organized 
April, I'M' 1 , covering mainly weaving and 
spinning of silk, wool and knit goods, with 
strong centers in New York, Philadelphia, 
Northern New Jersey and New England. 
Since its organization has reached a maxi- 
mum of 50,000 members; present member- 
ship, owing chiefly to business depression, 
21 M K 

Has reduced hours of work- in wool and 
cotton textile weaving from 54 to 48; in 
silk and knit goods from 52 to 44: achieved 
a 50 per cent increase in wages. Has in- 
troduced collective bargaining in New 
York silk and ribbon industries and in 
some of the Xew Jersey mills, and ma- 
chinery for settling disputes. In the Law- 
rence strike of 1919 it won a 15 per cent 
wage increase and reduced hours from 54 
to 48; in 1919 in Paterson it won the 
forty-four-hour week; in New York and 



Chicago, iti 1919-1920, it secured the forty- 
four-hour week and recognition of the 
union for knit goods workers. In L'tica. 
in 1919, a 25 per cent increase in wages 

was s cured. 

An Educational Program 
The labor movement is awakening to 
li/alion of its need of trained leader- 
ship and of higher educational standards 
in the rank and tile and is etsablishing its 
own educational system. "Workers' educa- 
tion falls inside the classification of adult 
education, but is not to be confused with 
university extension, night schools, forums, 
Americanization and the like-. It is an en- 
terprise arising inside the labor movement, 
having for its purpose tin- liberation of the 
working class, individually and collcc- 
ti\ ely." 

The International Ladies' Garment 
Workers' Union, which in l'»14 appro- 
priated $1500 for educational activities, is 
the pioneer. In 1915 work was begun in 
co-operation with the New York Board 
of Education. The 1920 convention of the 
union appropriated $15,000 for education. 
There are now seven centers in New York 
City, in public school buildings where 
classes of union members are conducted, 
and a Workers' University conducted in a 
high school building. Subjects in these 
courses cover Music. Art, Health. Litera- 
ture. Economic Geography, The Co-opera- 
tive .Movement. Logic, Applied Psychol- 
ogy, Historj of Civilization. 

Similar enterprises have been estab- 
lished in Boston, Washington, I). C, Se- 
attle, Rochester, Baltimore, Philadelphia, 
Cleveland and other cities, by various 
groups, sometimes in association with uni- 
versity groups. 

In January, 1921, a Workers' Education 
Bureau was organized in New York to co- 
ordinate and assist the educational work 
now being conducted by the workers, to 
collect and disseminate information and to 
stimulate the creation of other similar 
enterprises. 

A Labor News Agency 
In January, l'L'o. at Chicago, tin- Fed- 
erated Press was organized for the pur- 
posi of collecting and distributing to its 
members news of the labor and political 
movements throughout the United States 
and Canada and eventually throughout the 
world, it began with eight members pay- 
ing assessments, and now has a member- 
ship of 123, claiming about three million 
readcr>. 

This news agency transmits news, 
features and cartoons to its members, and 
estimates that in many cases SO per cent 
of the reading matter in the labor papers 
of the country is furnished by this service. 
It has effected a plan by which a chain 
of labor papers is published at its plant 
in Chicago, under a method which leaves 
two pages of the paper lor local news, and 
the remaining six made up in uniform 
style. 

News bureaus have been opened in 
Washington, 1). C. New York City and 
Sydney, and correspondents placed in 
Vienna. Berlin, Paris, Oxford, England, 
Warsaw, and Florence, Italy. Connections 
have been made with the labor press of 
Europe, this agency supplying more than 
i. in- hundred papers in Germany with 
American news, and co-operating with the 
Scandinavian Press Association and the 



London Daily Herald in the exchange of 
news. 

Practically every group and faction in 
the labor movement is cooperating in this 
enterprise. 

An auxiliary supporting organization 

has been formed, known as the Federated 
Press League, with branches now estab- 
lished in more than thirty cities. Its pur- 
is "To defend the principles of free- 
dom of the press against all forces which 
seek its destruction, to support the Feder- 
ated Press in the field as an expression 
of this principle, and to assist in every 
possible manner the extension and de- 
veloping of the Federated Press." 



PECULIARITIES 



The Bulletin of the National Single Tax 
League calls attention to the fact that 
"Five years ago there were 'too many 
people in the world.' That was how some 
university 'economists' explained the high 
cost of living. Since then about ten mil- 
lion people have been killed off in addition 
to the regular number of deaths through 
natural causes. And the cost of living is 
still up, with a tendency to go higher. 
Unemployment, these same economists at- 
tributed to overpopulation. Put at the end 
of a wholesale slaughter, principally of 
laborers, employment i< scarcer still, and 
wages are dropping. The 'economists' had 
better find another scapegoat before too 
many of the 'unlearned' observe that mo- 
nopolizing of natural opportunities has 
some effect on production and distribu- 
tion." 

* * * 

If that much abused expression, "One 
hundred per cent American." property ap- 
plies to anyone, it is to the American citi- 
zen who would abolish one hundred per 
cent of privilege, make labor and enter- 
prise one hundred per cent fine of taxes, 
and take for public one hundred per cent 
of the rental value of the nation's lands, 
in order that one hundred per cent Ameri- 
cans may have access to one hundred per 
cent of the natural resources without 
tribute to any monopolist. Unfortunately, 
however, the term has been appropriated 
by those who harbor designs on one hun- 
dred per cent of wealth created by others, 
and they concede its use only to those one 
hundred per cent subservient to them. 



Nebraska bankers are under fire of the 
Federal Reserve Banking system on a 

charge of profiteering in money secured 

from the Reserve Bank. 

Governor McKelvie asked the federal 
Reserve system to aid the farmers in 
Nebraska and he was told that if Nebraska 
banks would stop gouging their customers 
times would be better. 

The banks, of course, are indignant at 
the charge. 



Evidence of restoration of friendly rela- 
tions with Germany were given at New 
Vork last week when the steamer "Correc- 
tion," bearing a welcoming committee 
named by Mayor Hylan. went down the 
bay to greel the steamship "Bayern," the 
first German passenger ship to arrive at 
an American port since 1914. The "Bay- 
ern" carried 564 passengers from Ham- 
burg. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



FRENCH LABOR AWAKENS 



More than 100,000 French workers are 
on strike in the Lille, Turcoing and Rou- 
baix regions, involving the textile indus- 
tries, metal trades, bakers and some of 
the transportation branches. It is expected 
that the number of idle men will be ma- 
terially increased. 

The Government is greatly dejected at 
the rejection by the employers of all efforts 
of the Ministry of Labor to effect a settle- 
ment by compromise on wages for the 
next six months, although the workers 
themselves favor such an agreement. 

The Lille garrison is being reinforced for 
the protection of food supplies, and sev- 
eral detachments of cavalry have been 
forwarded to patrol the railway lines wher- 
ever there have been threats of sabotage. 

The French General Federation of Labor 
is making an earnest effort to prevent the 
strike spreading to other districts, as it is 
planned to fight the problem of decreasing 
wages in one sector instead of interfering 
with the nation's productivity as a whole. 

There is a danger, however, that a spark 
having been applied to a highly inflamma- 
ble industrial situation, the entire nation 
will soon be struggling against the greatest 
social conflagration in its history, except- 
ing onl_\- the revolution. 

Extremists have for two and more years 
been telling workers that just as soon as 
the profiteers had wrung the last centime 
out of the war they would attempt to 
lower the standards of living and, if they 
could, force the workers back into a con- 
dition approaching slavery. These violent 
agitators are now everywhere inveighing 
against the Government and telling to 
eager listeners that the French people in 
victory will be in a sorrier plight than are 
German workers in defeat. 

In forcing the issue now the industrial- 
ists have imperiled the interests of their 
country. There will be many anxious days 
before they succeed in taking from pro 
ducers the things they gained during the 
war, if they ever do. 

French manufacturers have for several 
months been demanding the "deflation" 
of labor, but there has been some diffidence 
as to who should first "beel the cat" or 
suggest to the workers that they -must 
accept lower wages. 

In publications controlled by the em- 
ploying classes there has been a veritable 
flood of propaganda intended to influence 
a state of mind in the working groups that 
would be conducive to a peaceful and un- 
resisting acceptance of the program map- 
ped out for them. They have been told 
that the}' must for the time being be con- 
tent with less wages, but the assurance 
was held out .to them that they would 
reap the benefit in cheaper necessities of 
life within a few months. 

The "deflation" methods employed in 
the United States and the results gained 
there have been referred to as demon- 
strating the necessity for a similar policy 
being adopted for French industries. 
Lower wages and longer hours in Amer 
ica. the French worker was told, would 
be handicaps against French manufactures 
that would be disastrous. The "pauper 
labor" of America, press and forum have 
held out, threatened to destroy the eco- 



nomic advantage that Frenchmen have 
enjoyed since the war. 

French commercial travelers were re- 
ported to be coming back with stories to 
the effect that they were being undersold 
in every market. Several weeks ago 
large advertisements published throughout 
the nation stated that the United States 
Steel trust had made a number of cuts in 
the wages of workers, who were now- 
back to the before-the-war level, and in 
addition were working twelve hours a day 
and seven days a week. The ensuing 
competition, it was declared, could not 
be otherwise than ruinous. 

Shortly thereafter the great metal foun- 
ders declared a 25 per cent reduction 
in wages, and their move was instantly 
followed by every other branch of indus- 
try. Adding to the confusion was an an- 
nouncement by Finance Minister Doumer 
that extra "war bounties" granted for the 
high cost of living and not made perma- 
nent by parliament must cease forthwith 
in all Government controlled industries. 

In some instances workers have ac- 
cepted this situation as inevitable, but a 
vast majority is going to resist wage cuts 
just as long as possible. In Lille, Tour- 
coing and Roubaix factories have had to 
damp their fires and the men are holding 
their ranks well. As was to be suspected, 
extremists there are taking advantage of 
their opportunity to spread radical and 
revolutionary doctrines, with more suc- 
cess than the Government will publicly 
admit. 

It has been apparent to careful students 
that sooner or later French employers and 
employes would come to grips, and the 
struggle is expected to lie long and bitter, 
with results that no one can clearly 
prophesy. By maintaining satisfactory 
wages for the industrial workers and 
withholding crushing taxes from- the peas- 
ants the Government has been able to 
pursue its destructive imperialistic policies, 
but now the end has been reached. 

The citizenship is outraged and indig- 
nant because the specially favored ex- 
ploited the war and made unconscionable 
profits out of the miseries of the people. 
These profiteers are today in absolute con- 
trol of the Government, as they have been 
for seven vears. They are determined to 
keep their gains, if that be possible, and 
the cutting of wages and the shifting of 
taxes are in consonance with this determi- 
nation. The worker, who bore the brunt 
of the war, is now to bear the brunt of 
reconstruction, if the profiteer can compel 
him to do so. 

It was predicted two years ago that 
when France began to taper off from the 
long spree of profiteering and debt-pyra- 
miding there would be serious trouble, 
't has come just as it was scheduled. 
Beneath the widespread discontent smoul- 
der the fires of communism, which the 
i rovernment proposes putting down with 
a firm hand. Whether it shall succeed or 
not it is too earl}' to hazard a guess. 



"Let George do it" is a poor idea for 
union seamen. That which is everybody's 
business is generally nobody's business; 
therefore all members should make every 
effort to attend the meetings and give" their 
comrades the benefit of their ideas. 



iiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiii:!!!iiiii!iiiiiiiii!iiii;i:!iiiiiii:iiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Jlntoriinfionn] Sonrnon's 'Union 
of Auvorka 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



LAKE DISTRICT 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAK 

Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 355 North Clark 

K. B. NOLAN, Secretary 
THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 
Phone State 5175 

BUFFALO, N. "J GEORGE HANSEN. 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O E. J. SULLIVAN. 

1501 Columbus Road 

MILWAUKEE, Wis CHAS. BRADHERING, 

162 Reed Street. Phone South 598 

DETROIT, Mich WM. DONNELLY. 

410 Shelby Street. Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, O J. W. ELLISON. 

74 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

CONNEAUT, O 

992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio s. R. DYE, 

618 Front Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 

3308 Ea3t Ninety-second Street 

SUPERIOR, Wis WM. EDGEWORTH, 

724 Tower Avenue 



ES 
Street 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

Agent 

..Agent 

-Agent 

Agent 

..Agent 

Agent 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES 

Neadquarters: 

BUFFALO. N. Y 7 1 Main Street 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary 

ED. HICKS. Treasurer 

Phone Seneca 48 

CLEVELAND, 819 Superior Avenue 

Phone Main 866 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone South 698 

DETROIT, Mich 410 Shelby Street 

Phone Cadillac 543 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Avenue 

Phone Central 8460 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 35 West Eagle Street 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary 
Telephone Seneca 896 

CHICAGO, 111 355 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, 308 West Superior Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 74 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 3308 E. 92nd Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 992 Day Streel 

TOLEDO, 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 



PACIFIC DISTRICT 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 69 Clay 8t-e*t 

VANCOUVER, B. C p. o. Box 671 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 N. Thirtieth Street 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box ft 

ABERDEEN. Wash p. O. Box 280 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% Third Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal p. O. Box *T 

HONOLULU, H. T p. o. Box 114 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE. Wash 1016 First Avenue, South 

P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore Room 21. Ainsworth Building 

SAN PEDRO. Cal 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 86 Commercial Street 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P.- O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 68 Third 8treet 

SAN PEDRO, Cal p. o. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 41 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 111 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca Street 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 1676 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 118 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION 
C. W. DEAL. Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 166 Steuart Street 

Phone Sutter 2205 
STOCKTON, Cal Labor Temple 



FISH TRAP PILE DRIVERS AND WEB WORKERS 

OF PUGET SOUND AND ALASKA 

1315 Dock Street, Bellingham, Washington 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 







Lai>or News 








; 


' 



The Californi; i • il Federation of 
Labor held its Annual Convention 
last weel< at San Jose. Long B 
will entertain the delegates to the 
1922 gathering. 

According ti> statistics gathered by 
the Committee on Unemployment of 
the Unemployment Conference, not 

than 4,1 and not less 

than 3.7IKI. (Kin persons arc out of 
employment in the United States. 

With the adoption of a declaration 
favoring the creation of a new politi- 
cal party of organized labor and the 
organized farmers, the convention of 
the United Mine Workers came to 
an end October 5. after having been 
in session since September 20. 

Charges that the United States 
Government has thrown thousands 
of persons out of work and "spread 
the psychology of industrial tin- 
were made by the National 
Federation of Federal Employes at 
the lirst hearing of the President's 
Unemployment Conference at the 
Department of Commerce. 

Leaders of the Big hour Brother- 
hoods and affiliated unions declared 
they had little doubt that the railway 
employes had voted for a general 
strike rather than accept the ■ 
reduction, but announced that a 
nsel ot the leaders might pre- 
vail against a walkout. 

A mission. headed by James 
Henry Thomas, M. I'., of England., 
whose object is to combat the radi- 
calism now permeating the Interna- 
tional Federation of Trade Unions, 
will appear in this country within 
the next few months to seek the aid 
of the A. F. of 1.. 

\ new element entered the strike 
of the oil workers of Kern county 
and Coalinga when more than one 
hundred women, wives, daughters 
ami mothers of strikers, set forth 
to interview the men who remained 
at work and try to pet them to quit. 
The move was undertaken at the 
request of strike leaders who ad- 
dressed the women at a special 
meeting in Bakersfield, Calif. 

A blanket indictment naming 
forty-three contractors, union busi- 
ness agents and others, was returned 
at Chicago last week by the I 
County Grand Jury, which has been 
investigoting charges that a build- 
ing trust existed. The indictment- 
charge a conspiracy to restrain the 
use of non-union material. Among 
those indicted were Harry Jensen, 
president of the Carpenters' Union, 
and William F. Brims, former presi- 
dent of the Carpenters' District 
Council. 

Fifteen of the twenty-nine locals 
of the International Longshoremen's 
Association at New- York recently 
voted to withdraw from the organi- 
zation. Spokesmen for tin- seceders 
announced they would appeal to 
Mayor Hylan and ask him to 
negotiations with Steamship interests 
tor them with a view of ending the 
strike at this port. They declared 
that if negotiations could be estab- 
lished they would return to work 
pending the outcome. A warning 
that open shop conditions may ■ 
if the longshoremen who went 
strike on Saturday without union 
authorization do not return to work 
was issued by Anthony J. Chlo 
president of the International Long- 

nen's Association. 



Office Phone Main 2865 
Residence Phone Elliott 4271W 



Established 1890 
COMPASSES ADJUSTED 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

WE GUARANTEE to teach you until you receive a LICENSE. 
WE will save you TIME and MONEY. 

435-36 GLOBE BLDG., FIRST AND MADISON 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



DENTIST 

Hours: 9 a. m. to «:30 p. ra. 

EUGENE PAYNE, M.D., D.D.S. 

At 3 Fourth St. Mezzanine Floor 

California Theatre Building 
Market St. Corner Fourth St. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL. 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main am) First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

i'n. lor a rule adopted by the Seattle 

Postofflee, lei i< ■ •! in care of 

Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 

not be held longer than 30 days from 

date ei' delivery. If members are unable 

in , ::ii or have their mall forwaded 

•iod, they should notify 

to hold mail until arrived. 

Asten, Ceo. W. Kerai h, I 

Andersen, C. B. Koeh, Herman 

Askersfrom, Oscar Kouistra, Sam 

rd, A. M. Kaa, Nils 

•.son, H. Kearney, Hugh 

Anderson, A. C. Kuhlman, A 

ion, G. B. Kereher, Wm. 

son, John Kraklla, AH) 

ainson, O. A. Kan.-, C. 

Anderson, Albert Kretchman, Max 

Anderson, Andrew Kolodze, Geo. 

hi, W. C. Kelly. A. J. 

Ackerman, Anton Kother, H. 

Anderson, S. M. Karlson, K. 
Arstad, B. 

Lame, John 

Berg, <;. w. Law, it. C. 

Blackman, Arthur Leskinen, John 

r, R, li. Lyslad, John 

Behring, C. Lovendal, Pete 

Bjorkqvest, R. Lund, 1 1 

Barry, Wm. Lesklnen, Yrja, 
m, A. G. John 

ss, J. W. Laml ei t, Edgar 

Win. Liu, i -ta 

Boudrank, E. T. Lokken, i >. 

Larsen, K. C. 

ont, Joe Langen, John 

Blomgren, A. Lindengrem, 

\. (package) Llndekranz, C. 

Bellah, Leo Line. Theodore 

!a , F. Llw oln, 1 1 

Bergstrom, Ernest Larsen, Rudolf 

anan, R. M. Lowendal, P. 
Bauliani, F. A. 

McCall, <:. W. 

Chrlstensen, Aug. ' K. -1620 

irk, B. G. ■!. Angus 

i ' mi, ii, ii. .la mis Mcl 'onnell. M. 

Carlson, Harold Moherg, All'. 

Campbell, Andrew Mayer, -P. M. 

Caldwell Meza, -lose 

Carr, Bob Mattson, Olaf 

i, John E. Magnusen, .Nils 
on, Wm. 

Campbell. C. Nelson, Emil 

1'iaemer, L. C. Nicholsen, Chi 

• 'nils,, n, Rudolf Neve, J. 

Carlson, Chas. Nielsen, C. J. P. 

Nelson, D. J. 

i lavie E. R. Nerse, A. 

Overland Erik Nerberg, J. E. 

id .1. W. Nielsen, N. C. -1224 

Nyman. John 

Brlkson, M. Ness. IT. 

Erikson, John Nelson, A. B. 
Erickson, Eddie 

Escalanto, J. E. Olsen, C. -1412 

Eekholm, B. Olsen, Jens 

Elze, Carl Olsen, O. J. 

Edwards, John ' >soo, M. 

Ericksen, Nils Osterholm, Ernest 

i lis, n 
Fleming, M. n, Chris 

< ii !onnor, B. L. 

Cordon. Arthur Olsen, P. 

'Iran Jooh Olsen. Herman 
' iuerra, Anders n, > Haf 

Onndersen, J. Olsen, ChrlstofTer 

Goughan, Thos. Ohm. H. 

Griffiths, Ben Olsson, Julius 

Olsen, Jolian ll. 
Hanson. Ingvald 

Hohnberg, Frank Petersen, O. 

3. A. 'iry 

Harris. John P. Petersen, Car] 

Hanson. .Tim -on. .laan 

Harris, F. Pivoch, John 

1 I aland, die 

John Petterson, TI.-2266 

iiiiiirr, ('has. L. Pearson, 3 

Handi, W. Pedei- 

Hammond, Allen Peterson, A. II. 
Huoslin, Remington Pi-dors, n. Peder 

i. n. E. Petersen, BJarm 

i. Martin Pedersen, P. C. 
Hansen, 11. P. 

Hemes, C. Quandt, A. 
Hansen, John 

Roon, W. O. 

Ingvaldsen, Arthur Reed, Geo. A. 
Rosen, E. H. 

Jonsson, Per Emil Reyes, M. C. 

Johnson, G. A. Rasmussen, T. C. 

Johnson, Oscar Rod, T. 

i. Hans i s, Frank 

i llialmar Rossani. •' I 

Johnsen, Andrew Ryan. Janus 
Johnsen, Alex ers, Jack 

n, Carl Robertsen. James 

9, A. H. Rivaul, John 
n. TT. P. 

Johnson, Adolf Slmmonds, J,,lin 

risen, Johna. Stenberg, Hi dinar 

Fred. Solburg. Chas. 
• 'tto 

H. L. Bharman, C. S. 

Karlson, O. A. -1190Saro, H. 

Krause, Arthur Stiftler, R. 
Kill. Andrew Sater. P. P. 

Kelly, P, J. Slattery, H. 



Samuelsen, II. 

,n, Albert 
Sorenson, Oeo. 
Sdolan, Nills 

i iscar 

Swans, -n. linben 
Sabro, R. \v. 
Shappe, E. M. 
Simon: 

Pal 
Sjoldenburg, P. 
Sorensen, Met \ 
Soderman, E. 

Thuchlnsky, Theod. 
Torjusen. Gunvald 
Tnern, Arvid 
Thacker, C. J. 

ning, t'liristoffer 
erg, Axel 
Takkes, J. 



Undelstvedt, B. C. 



A. 
W. 
E. 

T. 



W. 



Wilson, 
Waie, T. 
Wald, P. 
Wald. J. 

ross, 
White. B. 
White, Chas. 

Watson, J. v. 

■Mil \, 

Williams, W. 

Toung, Joe 

i. 8. 
Jurnoff Harris 

/.iui, i a, George 






PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Condurted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH, 
four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
[ostructor in New York Nautical College. 
Pier No. 1, Rooms 37-38-39 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Old Reliable House of Staples 

K. K. Tvete & Sons 

Incorporated. Established 1S90 

MENS CLOTHING. SHOES, HATS 

and FURNISHING GOODS 

108-110 Main Street, Seattle, Wash. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Alaska Fishermen's Letter List. 



Alaska Fishermen 

Letter List 
Audrey. A. Bell 
Anderson, Olaf 
Andersen, Ole 
Brumftlt, Walter 

, Chas. 
Brown, Ooorge A 
Carlson. Eddy 

D. 
(arisen, E. 
Carlsen, Ernest 
Clark. Bruce 
Dentril, Salvatore 
Dalln, August 
Erikson, John 
Flem, Knut 

R. J. 

Harris. .] 

Hagburg, Gust. 

n, N. M. 



'sJohansen, i\ I ! 
Karlkrsmoll, 
Larsen, Theodore A. 
Lldoroff, N. 
1M uller, \ 
Nordbli m, l ten. 
Ni son. ( I 
Ness, Ben. 
( ils, ii, i iscar J. 

Roni, E. 
Ryan, Jack 

I lerman 
Smith, R. 
Skooba, -Nils 

Walter 
Bchaffer, Paul 

Registered Mail 
Mittemeyer, John 
Meyer, Hans 
Rassmussen, Peter 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Anderson, E. F. Newlngton, Fred 

Anderson, Olaf Olsson, Chas. 

-1118 Pedersen, Wilhelm 

Anderson, John C. Peterson, John 

Anderson, Charlie Parker, Arthur 

Alhers, George Rengsderf, W. 

Barton, M. Rawley, Bruce 

Bohm. Aug. Rubens, Chas. 

Carman, P. Randle. C. W. 

Fostervold, Kasper Saro. W. 

Gustafson, J. Smith, C. Johan 

Harris, John T. Smith, Fred 

Molmberg, Trans. Smith, Emil 

Johannessen, Alf. Schant. H. 

Johannessen, Jonas Tonsfeldt, John 

Jackson, John Torjesen, Gunwald 

Jesperson. Martin Vejvada, Frank 

Lepp, Alex. Vetters, Oscar 

Laisel, Harry Westerberg, Carl 

Nielson, Chr. Wilenius, J. T. 
Nielsen, Hans 

Tacoma Letter List. 

Alder. I., una i.l Reel • one, W. F. 

ii,/., Joseph Sandberg, John 

Jarvlnen, < iscar Bi ully, John 

Low, G. Shmitt, John 

Marvis. John T. Smith, Carl T. 

P. Thompson, T. 

Nelson, Andrew B Ulllappa, K. s. 
Robinson, I.. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A 

FULL STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SCSPENHEKS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



UNION LABEL 
SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

NYMAN BROS. 

Bee Hive Store 

Men's Furnishings, Hickory Shirts. 

Hats. Oil Clothing. 

Home of the Union Made 

Co-operative Shoe. 

302 So. F Street, ABERDEEN, Wash. 

on the Water Front. 



Honolulu Letter List. 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Si i essor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Rl tired Member Sailors^ Union 

ABERDEEN. WASH. 



18, I 'anii-1 
Johai 

er, Emil 
i ee Robt. 
Kant, l lerman 

( Us. ,li, Carl W. 



Bvene 
Shaw, n. 

Springman, W. II. 
\"\ illardsen \\ . 
Wehrman, John 



INFORMATION WANTED 



James Kenney of Philadelphia, last 
seen in Pennarth, Wales, is inquired 
for by V. McMahon, 96 Plain street, 
Providence, R. I. 6-1-21 



HUOTARI & CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEE! I 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Mrs. Hattie McClellan, 510 James 
Street, Seattle, Washington, is desir- 
ous of locating her son, George L. 
McClellan, age 21; last heard from 
about year ago in Norfolk, Va. 
3-9-21 



Ole Toreson, born in Trondhjem, 
Norway, age about 30. His cousin, 
Tryggve Hagen, would like to hear 
from him. Address, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone 263 

"Niels and Charlie" 

"THE ROYAL" 
"THE SAILORS' REST" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Anders Tcodor Turesson, born at 
Gothenburg, will please notify The 
Swedish Firemen's Union, Gothen 
burg 7, Sweden. 11-24-30 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



San Pedro Letter List. 



1 ndersen, Chas. A. 
Anderson, Harold M. 
Anderson, B. A. 
Andreassen, Hans 
Anderson, Charley 

H. 
Alto. John -1349 
Aspe, Teodor 
Andersen. J. N. 



Alfredsen, 

Anderson, 

-1495 

Anderson, 



A. 
H. 



,\li M ullen, i -;i i 
MoVay, Finnic 
McCormick, H. 
McCloskey, W. 
McBride, G. 
McCord. 
MeNash. J. 
Moseley, S. 
Murphy, 



Albert 



J. 



M. 



Harry B. 



Anderson, Sam 

Ball, Hans 
Boyd, Walton 
Boyd, W. P. 
Bersin, Jacob 
Bergesen, Bert 
Berglind, Erik 

ClementKen, Alfred 
('listen. John 
Crawford, Thomas 
Cameron. Robert 
Carr, R. W. 
Catherwood, Horac* 
Calcoff, Sam 
Cordeaux, Thomas 
Christian, Jim 
Clark, Wallace 
Cormie, William 
Carlsen, Dick 
Carter, John J. 
Cumalet, John H. 

1 treyer, J. O. 
I lyiland, Erik 
1 leaver, Alvin 
Haunt, C. 

Ek, Willi 
Eliassen, Emil 
Emerson, Geo. 
Eiiasson, George 
Evans, John 
Blonen, Manuel 
Ebrecht, Fritz 

Fernandez, Chas. 
Fritze, Harry 
Forsberg, Alfred 
Folvik, Louis 

Gregory, Joe 
Gunnerud. U. 
Grundel, W. C. 
Gotz, Rudolf 
Gronthal, A. 
Gustafson, Johan 
Gray, A. 
< Iregersen, Kristian 

Hansen, Bernhard 

Hansen. Harold 
Harvey, Earl S. 
Horton, Geo. A. 
Ilanlon. William 
Hellman, Max 
Mickey, John 
Hall. Robert E. 
Hansen, Magnus 
Harwardt, Ewald 
Henriksen, Erling 
Horner, Ambrose 
l I :i:i ye, Norval 
Hogstedt, Chas. 
Hill. Charles 
Harbst. John -2905 

Janson, J. R. 

Jensen, Marius 
Johansen, Carl 
.Iiilmsen, George 
Johansen. Ed. -2240 
Jomo, John 
Jorgensen, ICnud 
Jonassen, Johannes 
Jensen. Paul 
Johnson, James 
Jackson, Wm. 
Junes. Arne M. 
Johnson, Tom 
Johnson. Oscar 
Johansson, Albert 
Jonessen, Fred 
Johansen, Johan 
Johnson, C. A. 
Johansen, J. E. 

-2873 
Jacobsen, Tom 
Jansson, Eles N. 
Johansen. J. -1432 
Jorgensen, J. 
i i nsson, Carl H. 
Johansen. Walter 
Johansen. A. 
Jorgensen, Jens G. 
Jensen. Kristian 
Jansson. John A. 

Isaac, John S. 

Klementsen, Erling 
Kopp, Carl 
Kuckens, B. 
Ki.ski. Juho 
Kopatz, Oscar 
Knudsen, Andrew 
Kiuger, W. -933 

lander, Wm. 
i ,i han. C. 
Lodersen, John 
I all. Karl 
l.arsen, Olaf J. 
Larson, C. S. 

Lindroos, Oskar 
l.inilliloin. Charles 
Liorenzen, Jean 
Lindholm, Charles 
Laursen, Max O. 
Lobelos, Jose 
1 ailirs. Ludwig 



E 
P. 
Mathiesen. N. 
Mize, J. H. 
Mathiesen. N. 
Melaa. Peder 
Mullen, Frederik 
Martin, Charles 



• 1037 
-1296 



iejahr, Oscar 

ii. S. 
Nelson, Charlie 
Nystrom, I'ihi 
Neville. Thomas 
Nixon. H. A. 

, iberg, c. W. 
Onnu. Tobias 
Olsen, Enok 



Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olsen. 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Ovist, 
Olsen. 
( Hsen, 
Olsen, 



Amandus 
E i i dinand 
Ole 

Flemming 
P. 

John 
Harold 
Arne 

Stephen 



Pastorillen, K. 
Peterson, I >. El -1558 
Persson, Bernhard 
Pehkola, Hjalmar 
Rudowich, Harrj 
Rand, J. E. P. 
Rengsdorf, W. 
Romani, Gaetani 
Rokow, Steve 
Runska, I Imiiv 
Runge, Robert 
Ruygrok, Dick 
Rostum, Harry 
Rogi i s, Arthur 

Svendsen, Geo. E. 
Strehle. F. 
Sandberg, N. A. 
Schellhouse, W. 
Sandboch, George 
Samuelsen, H. M. 
Seller, Robert 
Sandblom, H. 
Sutert. Ole 
Sorensen, Edwin 
Smith, Albert 
Schierenbeck, K. 
Shaw, G. s. 
Shaffer. Hoy 
Strasdin, Hans 
Swensen, J. E. -2290 
Sa ndstrom, H |alma r 
Sonde, O. 
Swanson, Hugo G. 
Thompson, M. 

Thompson, Maurice 
Thomas, Fred 
Tvete, Roy L. 

Vizcarra, O. 
Verney, Paul 
Vanquist, Ernest 

Wennerquist, A. 
Wichman, C. H. 
Wilhelmson, Karl 
Winkelman. i iltn 
Wilhelmson, Hans 
Williams, Frank 
Wall, George 
Wilhelm, Eduard 
Wright, Charlie 
Wilson, John 
Woide, John 
Wiestur, Willie 
Young. William 
Young. Carl 

Zimera, George 

Zetbury, Harold 

Registered Letters, 

Telegrams 
McVey, Frank 
Monterro, John 
Brast, K. 
Harwardt. Ewaldt 
Haierup. Axel 
Zilla. Josef 
Rudowltiz, Hairy 
Stevenson. Robert 
Haines, Harold 
McCormick, Harold 

Packages 
Campbell, J. R. 
Hennum, Christ 
Ek, Willie 
McVay, Frank 
Costley, F. L. 
Johansen, N. A. 
Offerdal, Ing 
Larson, Carl 
Hansen, Archie 
Jacobsen, John 
Jensen. J. 
Selin, W. 
Olsson, c. g. -1101 

sen, O. -2171 

Membership Books 

in Office 
Rod. Sakarias -1172 
Vasilopolos. S. -47(1 
Keller, Robert F. 

-1648 
Moller. Lelf T. O. 

-1894 
Rich, B. H. -1341 



Seamen! Have You Got a Copy of Axtell's 

Book, "Rights and Duties of Merchant 

Seamen"? 

It contains a digest of the maritime and statutory law which any seaman 
can understand. 

It is an education as to your rights as well as your duties. It will protect 
you wherever you are. It deals fully with the subject of wages, breach of 
contract of hiring, salvage, personal injury, maintenance, consul's duties 
and powers, authority of the master and officers and duty of the seamen 
to the ship and master; digest of your rights under the Constitution of 
the United Slates. Enclose a dollar in an envelope and we will mail you 
a copy. Reduced rates in quantities. 

RIGHTS & DUTIES PUBLISHING CO. 

9 State St. Iver Olbers, A. B., Sales Manager New York City 



^iiiii:i;i!iiiiimiiii;:ii:i!iiiiii;iiiii:ii;:iiiiiiii;i;i;iii^ 



V/ovW's V/er.kors 



For Twenty Years we have issued this Union Stamp for use under our 

Voluntary Arbitration Contract 

OUR STAMP INSURES: 
Peaceful Collective Bargaining 
Forbids Both Strikes and Lockouts 
Disputes Settled by Arbitration 
Steady Employment and Skilled Workman - 

ship 
Prompt Deliveries to Healers and Public 
Peace and Success to Workers and Em- 
ployers 
Prosperity of Shoe Making Communities 

As loyal union men and women, we ask 
you to demand shoes bearing the above 
Union Stamp on Sole. Insole or Lining. 

BOOT & SHOE WORKERS' UNION 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
COtLIS tOVEtY. General President CHARLES L. BAINE. General Se«ret»rv-Troas«rer 




Gudmundsen, J. -562Lems, Hendrick A. 
Williams, Albert J-, -2627 

-1707 Hultgren, August 

Powell, Patrick -190S -1612 
Jacobsen, Jacob Pehkola, Hjalmar 

-1938 -20G6 

Shurm, Clinton EarlEcklin, Carl -1240 

-3884 Gelbke, Heinrich 

Karjane, John -1628 -584 
Schmidt, 11. G. L. Heggum, Andrew 

-3619 3453 

Aibertsen, Harry Olsson. Nels O. 1710 

-2436 Smith, Edward Geo. 

Benbow, Chas. L. -3939 

-311] KristofEersen, Hans 

-1177 



INFORMATION WANTED 



"Cold Spring vs. Lycoming," "Be- 
noni vs. West Hargrave," "West 
I larcouver vs. Ozaukee." S. B. Ax- 
tell, 9 State St., New York City. 

Frank Hines, John Ryan and 
Harold Wood, who claim to have 
been forced off the SS. "West Que- 
chee" in France, December 14, 1919. 
please report or communicate with 
me at once. S. B. Axtell, Nine State 
street, New York. 4-20-21 



Old Reliable and Up-to-Date 

TOM WILLIAMS 

EXCLUSIVE TAILOR 
FOR MEN 

28 Sacramento Street 

Phone Douglas 48 7 4 



I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crews of the follow- 
ing vessels. In most cases, action 
has been commenced. In some cases 
the funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney with 
me. "Anacortes vs. Barge 95," 
"Alabama vs. Brandywine," "Bell 
Haven vs. Riverside Bridge," "Bak- 
ersfield vs. Eastern Sailor," "Beau- 
mont vs. Baladan," "Chester Valley 
vs. Campbello," "Cacique vs. Carta- 
gena," "Dachet vs. Hutchinson," 
"Delavan vs. Pennsylvania:-!," "Delana 
vs. Nevasco," "Devolente vs. Winova 
County," "Elkton vs. Cold Spring," 
"Eastern Glen vs. Andrew Jackson," 
"Silverado vs. Lake Faristan," "East 
Indian vs. Lake Flag," "Eastern 
Shore vs. Boston Bridge," "Eastside 
vs. Volunteer," "Eastern Sun vs. 
Jekyle," "Federal vs. Monamac," 
"Gypson Prince vs. Queen Makon- 
ing," "Glenwhite vs. Wathena," "H. 
F. Morse vs. Capulan," "Hadnot vs. 
Allentown," "Hickman vs. Faraby," 
"Intan vs. Putnam," "Ida vs. West 
Hepburn," "Lake Strabo vs. Lake 
Franconia," "Louisiana vs. Tallac," 
"Lake Freezeout vs. Liberty," 
"Mesholee vs. Johnson City," 
"Mooschausic vs. Jene L. Summer- 
ville," "Monasses vs. Eastern Queen," 
"New Briton vs. Braebrum, "Orctts 
vs. Johnson City," "Pawlet vs. Yana," 
"Pratt vs. Irish," "Shannock vs. 
Devo," "Sacanac vs. War Hagara," 
"Sutransco vs. Swedco," "Tollard vs. 
Gunston Hall," "Quabbin vs. Far- 
nam," "Tunica vs. Ncponier," "West 
Katan vs. Flavcl," "West Harcottver 
vs. West Hemmetite," "Western 
Hope vs. Impico," "Western Comet 
vs. Nordica," "Western Queen vs. 
Cripple Creek," "Westford vs. Osha- 
loosa and Osakis," "West Segovia 
vs. Wampum." "Western Comet vs. 
Nesco," "Western Pride vs. West 
Silkirk," "West Maximtts vs. Moose- 
hausic," "Western Front vs. Silver 
Queen," "Wonahbe vs. Consort," 



Mrs. Theresa Moran, 313 Rich- 
mond street. Providence. R. I., is 
anxious to ascertain the where- 
abouts of her brother, Dan Gillis, a 
member of the Firemen's Union, last 
heard of in Ashtabula, Ohio, about 
four years ago. Any information 
will be greatly appreciated. 4-27-21 



Carl Tossavainen, a former mem- 
ber of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, a native of Kuopio, Finland, 
age 33 years, last heard from on the 
Pacific Coast in February, 1913: 
any one knowing his whereabouts 
will please communicate with Busi- 
ness Manager, The Seamen's Journal, 
Saii Francisco, Cal. 12-1-20 



Mrs. L. Greenberg, 31 Lambert 
street, Roxbury, Mass., is anxious to 
ascertain as to the whereabouts of 
Charles Kasak, a member of the 
Marine Firemen's Union of the At- 
lantic, last heard of in New York, 
October, 118. 6-22-21 

Emil Nagard, 2438 Folsom street, 
San Francisco, California, is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of his 
brother, Joseph Louis Nagard, a 
member of the Marine Firemen's 
Union of the Pacific, last heard of 
at San Francisco, January, 1919. 

8-3-21 



Fore Grandinetti, of Campias, Bra- 
zil, brother of Cesaro Grandinetti, 
who died at sea, can recover $119.21, 
his distributive share of the estate 
of said Cesaro Grandinetti, by com- 
municating with Attorney Silas B. 
Axtell. 9 State St., New York, N. Y. 

4-13-21 



Mrs. Jeremiah T. Murphy, 39 Geer 
Street, (ileus Falls, N. Y., is anxious 
to certain the whereabouts of her 
son, Timothy J. Murphy, last heard 
of in March, 1919, at Burkeburnett, 
Texas. Those knowing his where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
his mother. 8-31-21 



By the vote of sixty-nine radical 
Socialists against forty-seven of the 
Conservatives, the Storthing have 
ratified the commercial treaty with 
Russia. In the course of the debate, 
Foreign Minister Raestad said that 
Russia would repay the Norwegian 
loan of 4,000,000 kroner. 

The French "plute" seems deter- 
mined to go the limit in degrading 
the "man with the hoe." Latest 
news from Paris show that Premier 
Briand has failed to settle the tex- 
tile strike at Roubaix and Tourcing. 
lie tried to induce the strikers and 
tin ir employers to agree to arbi- 
trate, but the employers are re- 
ported to have refused to negotiate. 

The strike called by the Socialists 
on account of the attacks by the 
fascist! is general throughout all 
Apulia. The situation continues 
serious and troops recently fired 
Upon an angry crowd at Milan, kill- 
ing five of the demonstrating 
Facisti and wounding twenty-five 
others. Among the wounded was a 
deputy of the Italian Parliament. 

Recent reports from Managua, 
Nicaragua, state that another revolu- 
tionary uprising has occurred near 
the Honduras frontier, the insur- 
gents sacking small villages and com- 
mitting depredations. An attempt by 
strikers to hold an American fruit 
steamer at Bluefields by preventing 
the crew from discharging cargo or 
loading fruit is associated with the 
revolutionary movement. 

The striking hotel employes at 
Berlin are seeking the support of 
English and Americans. Pickets 
have been posted in front of the 
hotels with signs written in English, 
stating that the employes of the 
establishment are locked out. Very 
little service can be obtained 
in most of the large Berlin hotels; 
food is not prepared, and it is diffi- 
cult to obtain so much as a cup of 
hot water. Both Germans and for- 
eigners are leaving, to the great 
regret of the magistrates, who are 
losing 10,000 marks daily in taxes. 
A number of hotels have given in 
to the demands of the strikers, while 
a few ?.re attempting to operate with 
strikebreakers, as yet without suc- 
cess. 

The vital question of unemploy- 
ment was considered at London re- 
cently by a joint conference of the 
general council of the Trades Union 
Congress, Labor party executives 
and Labor members of Parliament 
during a two-hour session. Tn an- 
swer to a request from Premier 
Lloyd George, the Laboritcs replied 
thai they would appoint a committee 
to meet the Premier carls- this week 
to confer regarding practical " 
urcs for dealing with what is de- 
scribed as "the present national 
emergency." The cabinet also dis- 
cussed the question at its afternoon 
session in an endeavor to put for- 
ward a plan which is yet in its early 
itages. The Laboritcs' reply to 
Lloyd George said a Committee 
would be appointed "to explain our 
prpposals and examine any made by 
the government, but not as mem 
bers of any joint committee includ- 
ing financiers and employers, as sug- 
d ... nor can our representa- 
tives be held responsible for the 
policy ultimately adopted by the 
co\ eminent." 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



m 



Domestic and Naval 



luminiiiuiim 

Secretary Morrison of the A. F. of 
L. declares the situation in West 
Virginia cannot be cleared up by an 
injunction judge any more than it 
can be by gunmen and thug govern- 
ment. 

Flying at the rate of 141 miles an 
hour, a dying boat recently com- 
pleted a trip of 188 miles in eij 
minutes, without a stop. A speed of 
165 miles an hour was maintained 
between Philadelphia and the Bat- 
tery, New York. 

The Yap-Guam cable, which has 
1, laved an important part in the con- 
troversy between the United States 
and Japan over the Island of Yap, is 
to be reopened as the result of a 
tentative agreement between Japan 
and this country. 

The l'. S. cruiser "Connecticut" 
has sailed from the Philadelphia 
navy yard to join the forces of the 
Pacific fleet at San Pedro. The 
"Connecticut" is to replace the 
cruiser "Frederick" as flagship of 
Rear Admiral Guy Barrage, com- 
manding officer of the train of the 
Pacific fleet. 

The American steamer "Arizona." 
bound from Tacoma to Vancouver, 
struck the rocks near San Juan Isl- 
and recently during a dense fog. 
Although fifteen feet of water 
poured into the vessel's lower third 
hold, the damage was not serious. 
After temporary repairs the steamer, 
under its own power, proceeded to 
Esquimalt to go into drydock for 
overhauling and repairs. 

Cable advices to Wolff. Kirchmann 
& Company, operators in the South 
Seas, throw some light on the loss 
of the British ship Cardinia, which, 
according to London cables, was 
lost somewhere mar l.evuka. The 
Cardinia, the latest reports said, was 
one day of Levuqa, en route to Apia 
to finish loading a cargo of copra. 
It is thought probable that she went 
ashore on some island in the Fiji 
up. 

( )f the 1464 steel hulls under con- 
trol of the United States Shipping 
Board, ''56 are now actually tied up 
ami sixty-three additional vessels 
will be laid up as soon as they can 
reach port and discharge their car- 
goes, bringing the total to 1019 
ships. The withdrawals are a con- 
tinuation of the retrenchment policy 
adopted recently by the board. At 
the present time there arc 420 steel 
ships in actual service and twenty- 
five undergoing repairs. Thesi 
sels are exclusive of the 1019 ships 
that have been tied up or are about 
to he withdrawn. 

The public employment bureaus of 
the State of California placed 36.479 
persons in positions during the three 
months ending September 30, ac- 
cording to a report filed with State 
Labor Commissioner John P. Mc- 
Laughlin by C. P>. Sexton, superin- 
tendent of bureaus. According to 
the report, 14,000 persons were 
given positions through the bureau 
during the month of September. Of 
this number 2636 were females and 
11.375 were males The following 
placements were made by the re- 
spective offices during the month of 
September: Los Angeles, 6056 per- 
sons; San Francisco, 19S0 persons; 
Oakland. 15X7 persons; Fresno, 1699 
persons; Sacramento, 709 persons; 
San Jose. 1515 persons, and Stock- 
ton, 493 persons. The employment 
bureaus at Marysville and Chico 
were closed July 31, the report says. 



Member of the Federal Reserve System 
And Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

MISSION BRANCH. Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets $71,383,431.14 

Deposits 67,792,431.14 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000.000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,591,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 357,157.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNT, Vlce-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Prea. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

A. H. MUT.I,ER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

O. A. RELCTHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cajihler 

ll. li. HERZER, Assistant Cashier H. P. MATNARD. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch 

W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT E. N. VAN BERGEN 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER ROBERT DOLT^AR 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW E. A. CHRISTENSON 

L. S. SHERMAN WALTER A. HAAS 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys 



Olson, James SldorotT., n. 

O'Connor, John J. Taylor. James B. 
I 'Isson. Carl J. Wagner. Ii. H. 

■in. Henry 

INFORMATION WANTED 



San Francisco Letter List 

Memners whose mall Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver. Business Manser. The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clay Street. San 
Francisco. Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only ami -vill be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 



Niger. Oskar 
Nllsen, Anders 
Nielsen, Alf. V. K. 
Nllsson, Axel-1176 
Niery, T>. R. 
Nllsson, Gustav 
Amlro 



Schroeder, C. F. 
Schultz, George 

holm, .1. it. 
Schussler, C. M. 
Seiffert, Ji. .i. 

ro. Joseph 
Simmering, C. L. 



Nieolaisen. Ancker Sidoroff, N. 

Xixon, L. A. Smart, I - 

Nolan, C. S. Smith, John II. 

Nordstrom, H. Sobel, Ralph 

Nordenberg. Alfred Sum,.. Hermann 

Nunstedt, Paul Sovll 

Spetteland, B. 

Olavsen, Otto B. Stall, Ralph M. 



Anyone knowing tTie whereabouts 
of Charles Petersen, a native of Ber- 
gen, Norway, last heard of in 1916, 
address P. O. Box 673, Juneau, 
Alaska. His father, Peter Iverson, 
is anxious to hear from him. Kindly 
communicate with A. Johnsen, P. O. 
Box 65, Seattle, Wash. 7-20-21 



Brother of Carl Wohmar Holm, 
a native of Isle of Nargem, Es- 
thonia, horn 1888, last heard of at 
Newport, Monmouthshire, England, 
on an American ship in 1916. Kindly 
communicate with Erik Kristian 
Holm, care National Sailors' and 
Firemen's Union, 9 Dubois street. 
Antwerp, Belgium. 7-27-21 



Adams, Sam 
A. Irian, Paul 
Ahrens, Walter 
Aimer, Bob 
Utonen, Carl 



Hansen. C. H. 
Heathorne. G. 
Hanson. O. -2099 
Hcin. M. 
Heikka, EX .1. 



Anderson, C. -2344 Heiss, Joe 

Anderson, II. B. Hendiieksen, J. R. 

Andersen, Albert Hetiand. Hnlvnr 

Anderson, E.-2459 Hililen, Reinhold 

Anderson, Sivert Ilililaina, S. P. 

Anderssen, W. II t. \V. F. 

Andersson, Chas. Hobby, Win. 

-10H Hubbard, Michael 

Andersson. C. J. Hvid, Hans 

-2185 

Anderson. Ingard Ingebrethsen, A. 

Andwerck, August Iverson, Iver 
Arntsen, August 

Aune, Edward Jacklln, Chas. 

Austin, Tom Jansson, .1. li 

Jansen, W, .1. H. 

Bell, Chas. Jacobsen, Alfred 

Benway. O'as. P. Jansson, K. Hj. 

Birkness, Olai Jameson, J. K. 

Bjorseth, Konrad Jensen, Lauritz 

Borgwardt, Curt Jewell, Al. M. 

Otto Johanson, John H. 

Roman, Gunnar Johansson, Bernard 

Houeh, Wm. Johnson, Henry 

Braman. George Jones. Alfred 

Brandt, Birger Johansson, Rudolf 

3rennan, Martin Johansson, W. 
Brink, Harold -1334 

Bridges, H. R. Johnson, Axel 

Burn. Joel Johnsson, C. J. 
Buckley. R. E. -1566 

Bywater, Chas. E. Jonson. H. Erlck 

Jones, M. 

Carlson, Gust -529 Jorgensen. Emil 

Carlson. Chas. K Juniper. Foster P. 

Carlsen, Arnt Jurikson, Julius 
Carlsson, Carl -1601 

Harley J. Kaktin, Ed 

Catechl, G. V. Kamm, John 

Chapell, Wm. Karlson. William 

Chavez, Mariano Kellog, Chas. M. 

Christiansen, Kluge, Frits 

Christian Kosklnen, Bruno 

Christensen, H. C. Krisjan, K. \v. 

Christensen, Einar Krui.jl. P. 
Christinson, WIlliamKristoffersen, H. O. 

Coffee, George E. Krause, Arthur 

Comet, Magnl A Kuhn, John 
Cordery. Allen 

Corich, Fred A. Laine, Albin A. 

Creth, Dave Laine, Gustaf 

Ozarnetsky, F. Larson, Finvald 

Larsen, Kaare T. 

Daly. Richard W. Larsen, Dagmar C. 

Danlelsen, P. Larsen, Lambert 

Daw, Walter II. Larsen, Leli 

DeLong, K. J. Larsson, Reinhold 

Delin, Ole La Madrid, K. 

I olbey, Richard Layne, Julian 

Douglas, R. W. Lawendahl, Peder 

Dreyer. Trygve Lehmann, Richard 

Duke. F. Leon. Richard 

Dumber. E. Lewis. W. A. 

Liesen. Wm. 

Ekeland, [ngvald Lilja, Birger 

KHiott. A. W. Llndquist, Oscar 

El lis, Frank L. Lindens u, i: 

Emmel, D. Little. M. R. 

EiiKlin. C. Lucey, James 

Esterhlll, G. B. Lundstrom, Anders 

!->■ i I ;. n. 

Palrbrothers, Eddie Lydersen, P. 

Fernquist, Charlie T,vm»n. T. 
Hinkenberg, Arthur Lynch, 10. J. 
Forsman, Andrew 

Forss, Ellis E. Mahoney. F. J. 

Ford, D. Maamusson. Carl 

Ford, E. H. Maison. A. G. 

Ford, Dough Mackenzie. Ed. 

Furs. A. R. Macdonald, Donald 

Fosse. Haraid MaeKenzie. Alex 

Poster, Herbert McCaughey, Joe 

Franson, Albin E. McGudden, Frank 

Friberg, Chas. McManus P 
Fuller, Everett E. Manzano, Luis 

McDermott, T. B. 
Gaare, Johan McCormick. H. W. 

Groth. Fred McLean, Angus 

McLean. Imnald 

ii, Trygve Meza, J. 

Hall, Ross L. Mello, M. N. 

Halley, Wm. Meolloy. Chas. P. 

Hansen, Antonius Mool, John 

Hansen. Jorgen Morgan. R. 

Hansson, Martin Mullins, John 

Hay, C. W. Murphy, Eddie 
Handrup, Axel 

H inschman, Win. Nalal, Henry De 

n. Andrew L. Nelson, A. s. 

-3384 Neumann, John 

Hansen. O. -2267 Nielsen. N. r. -1221 



Olsen, Alf. 
Olsen, A. H. 
Olsen, oie J. 

n. Albin 
Olin, Emil 
Ojust. Emil A. 
i Ussen, a. -1698 
Oraya, Enrique 
< isses, Andrew 
Ostlund, John 

Page, A. B. 
Palludan, Chas. 
Payne, J. E. 

n, Soren 
Pankratz, B. 
Paterson, Kenneth 
Paulsen. Axel J. 



ens, 'I'Ih. ii 
Sternberg. HJ. N. 
1020Stewart. J. H. 
Stone. M. C. 
Bundberg, K. K. 
Bwartz, <;. w. 

fsen, Emil 
Terrv, J. E. 
Thode, Rudolf 

Thorwick, H. S. 
Thomasen, Svennlng 
Thorsson, .\. 
Thomson, Geo. H. 
Thome, A. \V. 
Thorsen, Carl 
Tininiei iiiann. W. 

TJereland, Sverre 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Joseph Bert Riese, a native of 
Cleveland, Ohio, last heard of De- 
cember 1, 1919, in Savannah, Ga., 
when he shipped on the SS. "West 
Apaim," please communicate with 
his mother, Mrs. Joseph Riese, 4120 
Bailey avenue, Cleveland, O. 

6-29-21 
Mrs. John M. Eshleman, 601 Un- 
derwood Building, San Francisco, is 
anxious to ascertain the whereabouts 
of Louis Bartels. a native of Fin- 
j land, age 45 years, hair and com- 
plexion light, medium built. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts will 
please communicate. 9-14-21 



Pedersen, W. -1535 Toff or, A. 

ii. Ernst Tomlin, Edward 



Put. Richard 

Petterson, C. V, 

Pedersen, Eysten 

Plhlplk, C. 

ritali, Tony 

Pilklnton, Homer 

Pope, Bert 

Prebensen, Nicolai Vagner, John 

„ , , n , Vilkooy, S. F 

Rankin, Orrin 
Raasu, Matti 
Raja, Joe 

ssen, Hans 
Rasmuseen, Jack 
Hasinussen. Aksel 
Reiersen, Johan A. 
Ketesgord, Hlllm. 
Rodowitch, Harry 



Tourtellot. W. L. 
Torgerson, Ed. 

1 os ii . James M. 
Touzel, Mr. 
Trout, Frank 
Tyson. W. 



F. 



Rogenfeldt, John 
Rolf, Heinrich 

Rosenberg, Louis 
Roth, C. M. 
ltundstroin, Albert 

Ryan, T. 

Schaeffer, George 

V. 
Schmidt. E. H. 
Schnelle, W. 
Schuldt, Teodor 
Schibon, Paul 
Schreff, Paul 



Walker. A. 
Wallers, E. 
Ward, Stephen 
Warner. Claude 
Watson, A. 
Walenius, Peter 
Werang, i 
Weis, Bruno 
Wendel, Emil 
Werd, A. de 
W halley, A. J. 
Wlklund, Wictor 
Wilen. I. W. 
Williams, Terrell C 
Wintlier. Sigurd 
Wilhelm. Erick 
Williams. R. H. 
Wood, Richard 
Worman. Albert 
Wolschwltt, A. 

Ziehr. Ernst 



PACKAGES. 

Bola, M. Hansen. Hans 

oower, G. R. Heldal, Trygve 

i Jarter. a. Uoou, aiba. 
Christensen, Richard Johanessen A -2277 

Clark. Fred W. Kellog. Chas. M. 

Carpenter, Harold Keith. J. 

Dommelen, G. Ljungqvist, HJ. 

Elliott, Arthur W. Larsen. J. -_ul2 

Enberg, E. Maloney, J. J. 

Fischer. Chas. O. Murphy, T. 

Fosse, H. Nielsen, Alfred 



Louis Seipel, P. O. Box 67, San 
Pedro, Calif., is anxious to ascertain 
the whereabouts of Fritz Griesan, of 
Brandenburg, Germany. Any infor- 
mation appreciated. 9-21-21 



Thos. A. Jones, 720 N. Lancaster 
avenue, Dallas, Texas, is anxious to 
ascertain the whereabouts of his son, 
Thos. Lenard Jones, a member of 
the Marine Firemen's Union of the 
Atlantic. 3-9-21 



Uncle Hi had just passed his first 
night in a hotel and was still curious. 

"Son," he inquired of a bellhop, 
"what's that tunny contraption out 
the window?" 

''That's the fire escape." replied the 
youth. 

"By hickory! I wondered what 
made it so dad-blamed cold in here 
last night." 



Phone Kearny 5361 Union Tailors 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 
50 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



n.crti.1379 Your Old Friend 




JOE WEISS 

WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

92 FOURTH ST. nr. MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Union-Made Shoes for Men Exclusively 

Repairing Done While You Walt 

We use only the best leather that the market affords 



PACIFIC NAUTICAL 
SCHOOL 

260 HANSFORD BLDG. 
268 MARKET STREET 

Coiducted by Capt. Chas. Ehlers 
Formerly Superintendent of the 

CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

All up-to-date methods of navigation are 
taught for passing a successful examina- 
tion before the U. S. Inspectors 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



1. 



Phone Douglas 315 

Attorney for the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific since its organization. 

H. W. HUTTON 

Will give the cases of seafaring men 

prompt attention. 

527 Pacific Bldg., Fourth and Market 

Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 

Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

110 EAST STREET Near Mission 



GEO. A. PRICE 



SAYS 



'BUSINESS IS GOOD. YOUR MONEY'S 

WORTH AND YOU KNOW IT. 

THERE IS A REASON." 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 EAST ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 
OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 

— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 53*18 



Joint Accounts 

Thi6 bank will open accounts in the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom m~y 
.jeposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, N««r F»urth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Olaf Erling Hendriksen, a native 
of Norway, age 33, last heard from 
on the Atlantic Coast, kindly com- 
municate with his brother, Albert 
Hendriksen, Aalo Post Office, Chris- 
tiansancl. Norway. 6-1-21 



THE 

JAMES H. BARRY CO. 

<C%e Star Tress ■ 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

We print "The Seamen's Journal" 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 

NAUTICAL BOOKS and INSTRUMENTS 



MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS, $1.50 

MACARTHUR'S "SEAMAN'S CONTRACT," $4 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOK, 1921 EDITION, $5.00 

UNIFORMS and SUITS, TO ORDER and READY MADE 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING & BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 



36-40 STEUART STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 




You obtain full value for your shoe money when 
you buy 

W. L. DOUGLAS 

(Union Made) 

SHOES FOR MEN 

You know that the price is right. The price is 
Axed at the factory and stamped on the sole 
of tln> shoe. Also agents for 

STRONG & GARFIELD, JUST WRIGHT, 

WALK EASE 

Priced from 

$5.00 to $13.00 

58 THIRD STREET, S. F. 

Between Market and Mission 



PRICE'S 



AT THE DENVER CONVENTION 

the American Federation of Labor took official 
notice that 

— huge losses were suffered by workers last year 
through purchases of fraudulent and worthless 
securities. 

Convention Resolved 

— to call upon the United States Government "to rid 
the country of fraudulent schemers" 

— to assist the Government to bring to the attention 
of the union members the advantages of buying 
Treasury Savings Securities, issued in denomina- 
tions of 25c, $1, $5, $25., $100, $1000 

Buy Them Through Your Post Office or Bank 
Government Loan Organization 

Second Federal Reserve District 
120 Broadway, New York 




III II 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



S'lMOIf FRQ See th^ this label ( in light blue ^ a PP ears on the 
IVl KJ IV t. IV >J box in wllich you are served. 

Issued by Authority 01 the Cigar MaKers' International Union of America. 

~.?n. Union-made Cigars. 

fs7fc3E5£x*\ jMfcHBCriof Tut ocw MAJun'iNUftMTiowt wo* *„*;•'*• jl".^ 4fU f k !^ c l„ _*"' 



*«n»»«it of the MOBAi-MATlRlAlJftd WTUUC1UW. WUIARt Of THl Wfl llMfaaa*a»Ma0 

It tht WCM. 

pufui/ttd *ccgrd«( to iMJit 

V CMIU,, 



^JlWWfHHU^ItlaUtl'Mbl pur^lMd »u«tfn|tolMS(. 






•MAM' 



glllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillillllllllllilllllllllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllffl 

HI s 

News from Abroad | 

IllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 

Recent Lisbon reports state that 
the steamer "Quest," having on 
board Sir Ernest Shackleton and bis 
party on their way to the Antarctic 
on a trip of exploration expected to 
last for four years, has been placed 
in a difficult position by a heavy 
storm off Cape Da Roca. She has 
asked that help be sent. 

The North German-Lloyd will in- 
augurate its new service to Rio de 
Janeiro, Rio Grande del Sul, and 
Buenos Ayres in November, with 
the steamer "Seydleitz," to be fol- 
lowed in December by the new 
steamer "Hanover" of 9050 tons, and 
on January 5 by the new steamer 
"Gotha" of 8050 tons. 

E. C. Davison, Secretary-Treasurer 
International Association of Machin- 
ists, outlined the triumph of trade 
unionism in Mexico before the 
Washington organization of the 
Farmer-Labor party recently. He 
blamed much of the trouble in 
Mexico on the large American inter- 
ests having holdings there. 

Harold Bigby, an English motor 
engineer, crossed the English Chan- 
nel from Folkstone to Calais last 
week, on a bicycle fitted on two 
large floats with a propeller on the 
forepart of the machine driven by 
a rod which in turn was operated by 
the pedals. The rider covered just 
thirty miles in a little more than 
twelve hours. 

The Swedish Cabinet of Premier 
Von Sydow resigned as a conse- 
quence of the result of the recent 
elections in which the Socialist 
groups won 106 seats in the Second 
Chamber of Parliament. It is ex- 
pected former Premier Brcnting will 
be asked by the king to form a new 
ministry, to be entirely socialistic, as 
the liberals declare themselves un- 
willing to join in a new liberal- 
socialist condition. 

The reply of the Russian Soviet 
Government to Great Britain's re- 
cent note charging intrigue against 
Great Britain in Central Asia is 
understood to be on its way 
from Moscow. The note, it is 
asserted, does not attempt to an- 
swer the charges of the British Gov- 
ernment except to assert that the 
evidence secured by the Government 
was founded on forgeries emanating 
from "a notorious German agency." 

Trade in Great Britain has been 
freed from governmental control, the 
lasl vestige of supervision passing 
with the automatic lapse of the Gov- 
ernment's grant of 10, 000, 1100 pounds 
sterling for the coal mining in- 
dustry. The system of subsidizing 
industries is considered abolished, 
with the exception of the grant ol 
9,000,000 pounds sterling, which has 
been allocated to the carrying out 
of housing schemes by the ministry 
of health. 

The catastrophe tb the giant air- 
ship ZR-2 over the Humber river 
\iiLMist 24. in which more than forty 

1 'His. including sixteen Ameri- 
cans, lost their lives, was due to 
accident, according to the vet did 
reached by the coroner's jury at the 
resumed inquest at I lull. England. 
There is no evidence as to the actual 
cause of the disaster, the verdict 
This verdict was rendered in 
1I1. case of Lieutenant Commander 
Charles G. Little of the American 
navy, which was the first to be con- 
sidered by the coroner's jury. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 






With the Wits 



Helpful. — English is to be the offi- 
cii language at the Washington 
Disarmament Conference, bul inter- 
preters will In- provided for I 
who can only speak American. — Eve 
( London ). 

Inconsiderate. -'Now look Inn, 
Johnson, this man is doing double 
the work you do." 

•'That's what I've been telling him, 
»ir; but he won't stop." — Tin- Chris- 
tian Register ( Boston). 

The Carborundum Degree. — Samho 
Looky In-all, hig hoy. don' yo-all 

mess wid me. 'cause All's hard! Las' 

week Ah falls on a buzzsaw an' Ah 

1. lists it — com-plete-ly. 

Rambo— -Call dat hard? I i 

Man, Ah scratches de bathtub. -The 

American Legion Weekly. 



Nothing to Fear.— Trate Golfer— 
You must take your children away 
From here, madam. This is no place 
for them. 

Mother — Xow don't you worry; 
they can't 'ear nothin' new; then- 
father was a sergeant-major, 'e was! 
— London Opinion. 

Limited Liability. — Among the wit- 

nesses called in a trial in a Southern 
court was an old darkey. 

"Do you swear that what you tell 
shall he the truth, the whole truth 
and nothin- hut the truth?'' intoned 
the clerk. 

"Well, sah," returned the witness 
shifting uneasily. "Dis lawyer - 
lmin kin make it a pow'ful lot i 
on hisself an' relieve me of a in 
big strain cf he'll lea\ - thing 

ahout Kin an' chickens. 'Ccptin' fo' 
dose, Ah guess Ah kin stick to de 
truth." — American Legion Weekly. 

Government Instruction.-- " I low do 
you manage to make both ends 
meet'" we said to the happy little 
1 ousekeeper, 

"Oh, hut 1 don't make both ends 
meet," she corrected. "I keep 
like the United States, and never 
make ends meet." 

"Like the United States'" we 
ried, puzzled. 

'Acs; 1 get what I want whether 
I can afford it or not, and then at 
the end of the year I give im 
hand a deficiency hill. You know; 
just like Congress does every session, 
to make the public think it has lived 
within its income." Whereat we 
were lost in admiration. — Leslie's. 



Two men were waiting for a train 
and one said: "I will ask you a 
question, and if 1 can not answer 
my own question, I will buy tin- 
tickets. Then you ask a question, 
and if you can not answer your own, 
you buy the tickets." 

The other agreed to this. "Well.'' 
the first man said, "you see those 
rabbit holes' How do they dig those 
holes without leaving any dirt 
around them?" 

The other confessed: "I don't 
know. That's your question^ SO an- 
swer it yourself." 

The first man winked and replied: 
"They begin at the bottom and dig 
up'" 

"But," said the second man, "how- 
do they get at the bottom to begin?" 

"That's your question." was the 
first man's rejoinder. "Answer it 
yourself." 

The other man bought the tickets. 
—Boston Post. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is miller the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 

with all iiiecl.Mii appliances to Illustrate and 
i any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
witli higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several 
the Maritime T.aw, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 

There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the S 
for no matter how Ignorant tie- seaman may be, even in t lie rudiments of 
n education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well informed man, and In a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

HENRY TAYLOR 

500 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Hezzanlth's, Lord Kelvin's, Whyte, Thomson's Compasses. 
Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sounding Machines, Sextants, 
Parallel Rulers. Pelorus, Dividers, Nautical Books, Charts 
and Tide Tables. Fully equipped department for the 
and adjustment of chronometers, watches and 
clocks. This work is in charge of an expert of American 
and European experience. All work guaranteed. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When you buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash 



Diamond* 



Phone Douglas 5752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Watches 

64 MARKET STREET 
High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



Seamen! Watch for Developments 

See Our Weekly Reports Posted in All Union Halls. 

I have said that I would never be attorney for shipowners, until the 

seamen were shipowners. One of the purposes of my visit to Europe this 

summer is to acquire knowledge as to shipping conditions abroad and 

particularly to ascertain with what degree of success the seamen of 
Italy are operating ships. 

Any seamen, who. with a view to becoming shipowners some time, are 
willing to form "a Seamen's Society for Savings" and will pledge to save 
one-fourth of their wages over their board and lodging per annum, said 
savings to be put in a depository that they themselves may select, please 
:ommunicate with the undersigned. 

Silas B. Axtell, 9 State St., New York City 




Qamos J}. Sorensoft 



SILVERWARE g CLOCKS 

for wedding presents. Large stock to select from. 

JEWELERS, WATCHMAKERS, OPTICIANS 

715 Market St., between Third and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco 

All Watch and Jewelry Repairing Guaranteed 

Gifts that last by the thousand 




Will There be a 
Victrola in 

Your Home This 
Christmas ? 



We have the popular 

pleasi .1 tci 
demonstrate them 

CONVENIENT TERMS 
01 PAYMENT 

Victor Records 

Gladly Played 

For You 

MARKET AT FIFTH 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 
Established 1874 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN 
You Know Me 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats, too 
If you want your l'anama blocked 
right I'll do thai. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

762 VALENCIA ST., San Francisco 
Phone Park 9401 



BtfTOTn 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



ONION MADE 



S 






S^7^^rp^Eg55S^r'.wi-^ Mrt^rqF'iSS 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXV, No. 7. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1921. 



Whole No. 1775. 



Vojposal foip Closer <Co°©peiraiftii©ini IBeftweeini I£innipll©yeips aimdl WorRer© 



The following recent statement to members 
of the National Civic Federation, by R. M. Eas- 
ley, elucidates the extent to which the American 
labor movement is retrograding. 

In every other industrial nation the workers 
display a desire for more than a mere existence 
regulated by a master class; but as stated by 
Easley these movements do not even approach 
a program acceptable to American labor, which, 
under the policy of the A. F. of L. is fast be- 
coming nonresistent. 

A vein of intolerance towards efforts of the 
workers for a higher civilization and more equi- 
table adjustment runs through the whole state- 
ment: 

So many changes for the better have occurred 
in the industrial world since last Labor Day 
that really this year's celebration, in some re- 
spects, might well assume the character of a 
Thanksgiving for all of us, and this despite 
abnormal conditions. 

First, we have the pronounced turning to the 
"Right" on the part of labor in England, France, 
Italy, Germany and the smaller nations, to say 
nothing of the wholesome effect produced upon 
the labor mind of the world by the complete 
breakdown of Communism in Russia. While 
"turning to the Right" in this instance does not 
mean that these movements are even approach- 
ing a program acceptable to American labor 
which, thanks to its good sense and patriotism, 
has severed all official relations with them, it 
does mean a change from threatened Commun- 
ism by force to proposed Socialism by "con- 
stitutional methods." This light between the 
"Right-Wingers," the "Center-Wingers" and the 
"Left- Wingers," as described in cablegrams to 
this country, greatly confuses the public mind. 
For instance, a few months ago, there appeared 
in a Metropolitan paper these headlines: 
"French Labor Repudiates Bolshevism by a 
Vote of 1,478 to 602." That sounded well, but 
when the reader got by the headlines he dis- 
covered that the "majority faction" declared 
"unreservedly" that its "revolutionary objects 
were incompatible with present institutions and 
with capitalism and its present expressions"; 
proposed "immediate action for supervision of 
industry and commerce by the workers to be 
sought by direct action"; proclaimed anew "its 
ideal of economic liberation through the sup- 
pression of the wage system"; and urged "com- 
plete solidarity with Revolutionary Russia." 
The fight in the Orleans Congress, as in all 
the other European labor congresses that have 
turned down the Communists of Russia, was 
not between radicals and conservatives, between 
Socialists and anti-Socialists, but between Bol- 
shevists and Menshevists, to speak in Russian 



terms. In American terms, the battle was be- 
tween the Socialists and the I. W. W.'s — a 
struggle which is just as intense in this coun- 
try as the one at Orleans, the only difference 
being that here the Socialists and the I. W. 
W.'s, with all their factions and sub-factions 
combined, arc too negligible a factor to cut any 
figure. 

Italian Radical Failures 

Last Labor Day industry in Italy was headed 
straight toward disaster. Through the weak- 
ness of the Giolitti administration, the workers 
were being permitted to take over the fac- 
tories by force. To bribe them to return the 
factories to the lawful owners, after they had 
found that they could not work them, the Gov- 
ernment promised legislation which would prac- 
tically give over to them the management of 
the plants under color of law. Fortunately, the 
Italian people arose in their might and threw 
out tiic administration responsible for this out- 
rage, and with it went all the proposed crazy 
legislation. 

To illustrate how the governmental proposals 
would have worked, Senator Einaudi, of the 
Milan Chamber of Commerce, pointed out re- 
cently that, in the matter of private railway 
companies and their employes, an experiment 
in workers' control had been in operation since 
1906 which it would he well for the State to 
study carefully before launching any schemes 
looking further in that direction. lie added: 

"The results of this experiment could not 
have been more disastrous; complete suppres- 
sion of individual responsibility in the case of 
the managers of controlled undertakings; gen- 
eral discontent of the workers, who, being 
directly represented on the Commission of Con- 
trol, never consider the concessions obtained 
sufficiently large; enormous deficit of the un- 
dertakings compelled to meet the continual de- 
mands of the workers' representatives, and for 
the same reason imposition of excessive rates 
and fares on travelers; disorganization of the 
services, it being impossible for the companies 
to remove disturbing elements among the 
workers." 

German Workshop Councils 

In Germany, with a Socialist government, it 
was feared for a time that the Communists 
would take control of industry with Bolshevist 
money, and later on the government. That 
fear soon passed, but, as in Italy, an attempt 
was made to propitiate the workers by giving 
them an elaborate workshop council system of 
government, hitched up with a fantastic scheme 



for an industrial Reichstag based upon a com- 
bination of Guild Socialism and Sovietism with 
a strain or two of Whitlcyism. The principles 
of the Works Councils are established in the 
German constitution, and the law provides for 
a council in every public or private industry 
having as few as twenty employes. Where 
there are less than twenty and more than live, 
it provides for a shop steward with the func- 
tion of a council. 

It is not far enough along today for its epi- 
taph to be written, but its end can be predicted 
with certainty because the labor unionists, who 
are for it to a man, even establishing schools 
to educate their works council members, be- 
lieve in it because they regard it "as merely 
an installment and the first step toward effectual 
Industrial Democracy." The employers, for the 
same reason, are just as emphatically opposed 
to the law, complaining that the works coun- 
cils "have created in the working of every 
undertaking impediments which are at once un- 
necessary and wasteful of time and money." 

It is a great scheme on paper, but the sturdy 
German employer, who is "buckling to" by 
night and by day to pay off the reparation 
award and who has to compete against the mar- 
kets of the world, will not long be bamboozled 
by any such academic and Socialistic program. 
Strange to say, however, this German scheme 
already has some admirers in the United States. 
An American employer, who was chairman of 
the industrial relations committee of one of 
the national parties in the last campaign, re- 
cently declared: "It is perhaps as near the final 
step in the progress toward a solution of the 
industrial problem as we can now see"; and 
he further stated that he believed "that the 
present trend of thought in America is toward 
something along the German plan united with 
something along the Kansas Industrial Court 
plan." An American banker of international 
standing is, likewise, impressed with the Ger- 
man program as being an effective method to 
deal with the industrial situation, lie is quoted 
as "emphasizing the fact that this movement 
is covering the whole field of Italian industry; 
that, the French Progressives are committed to 
it; and that the whole British Labor movement 
is demanding the adoption of plans involving 
the same idea." 

British Socialistic Policies 

In England, a year ago, revolution was in the 
Mr, Everyone was talking it whether he be- 
lli ■ \ < ■ r 1 iii it or not, which seemed to help it 
along. The most conservative labor man — thai 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



is, conservative for England- signed the threat 
of the Council of Action that if the Govern- 
ment persisted in aiding Poland to save her- 
self from the Red Army of Lenin, labor would 
call a general strike. They even cabled to the 
president of the American Federation of Labor 
calling upon him to have the workei 
America refuse to move trains or steamers that 
contained military supplies intended for Poland 
or to work in factories which produced such 
supplies. Mr. Gompers sent the committee a 
scathing reply, which was applauded by every 
good American of whatever station in life, only 
one paragraph of which, for lack of space, 1 
quote: 

"The American Federation of Labor is not 
a revolutionary body and has never had any 
affiliation with any revolutionary body which 
would require it to give serious consideration 
olutionary proposals of any kind. It has 
considered or compromised with any 
revolutionary movement to upset our institu- 
tions by violence. The appeal of the Inter- 
national Federation of Trades Unions and of 
the Council of Action are appeals to revolu- 
tionary violence. The International Federation 
of Trades Unions declares very clearly that it 
must of its own accord and within its own 
find the power to preserve the world 
from terror and anarchy. The world is not 
theatened with terror and anarchy unless it be 
?rOm the Soviets, For the aid of which these 
manifests are issued. If the world is to lie pre- 
from this or any Other danger, it must 
be by the action of democratic governments 
i by the people." 

Compare with this the following defense of 
the policy of the Council of Action made by 
Mr. James 11. Thomas, M. I'., and General 
Secretary of the International Union of Rail- 
waymen, who has been regarded by many, in- 
cluding himself, as the logical successor of 
Mr. Lloyd Geo 

"Desperate as are our measures, dangerous as 
are our methods, we believe the situation is so 
rate that only desperate and dangerous 
methods can provide a remedy. These resolu- 
do not mean a mere strike. Do not make 
any mistake. They mean a challenge to the 
whole constitution of the country. 

"It means a fight against the constitution of 
our country, but 1 do believe that we are a 
united labor movement, and much as we regret 
the action, much as we deplore it, we are pre- 
pared to take the risk." 

A year ago it was feared that the miners 
would tie up all of Great Britain's industries 
through a strike of the Triple Alliance l" be 
followed by a general strike of all the workers. 
ever, neither of those "scarey things 
eventuated, but it was due to no lack of revolu- 
tionary zeal on the part of the Labor party 
leaders. It was the great British public which 
said. "They shall not pi 

Some American Problems 

In this country, a year ago, there appeared 
on the industrial horizon possibilities not pleas- 
contemplate. It was asked: How would 
the workers, as a whole, accept the deflation in 
that inevitably had to follow the joy- 
period of high wages during and just 
after war, and the unemployment that certainly 
would accompany it"' Would the railroad work- 
ers, the miners and the dock workers tie Up 
all transportation and manufacturing by a gen- 
eral strike that was being predicted by the 
of Moscow, who claimed enough Reds 
here in strategic positions to bring about the 
revolution they fondly dreamed was at hand? 

Fortunately, those fears have passed away 
and, while there are still grave questions to be 
stttled and a hard winter is, undoubtedly, ahead 
calling upon us to put forth our best energies, 
it is safe to say that there will be no revolu- 
tion and there will be no starvation. 

Another great fundamental difference between 
the labor movement of this country and that of 
every other relates to its economic program. 

Last June. The National Civic Federation en- 
tertained at luncheon two employer members 
of the Industrial League and Council of Eng- 
land, the organization representing the Whitley 
Council movement, Mr. Whitley himself, with 
a labor leader, being associate president. This 
organization is composed, as is The National 
Civic Federation, of both employers and wage- 
earners. Upon returning to London last month, 



the Industrial League's representatives made a 
report at a public dinner given in their honor, 
which was quite fully published in the Fnglish 
newspapers. The comparison they made be- 
tween the two countries industrially was most 
complimentary to America on every point. One 
sentence alone from the speech of Mr. Ernest 
J. P. Benn explains the whole difference be- 
tween the policies of the two countries. lie- 
said: 

"The whole force of public opinion in Amer- 
ica is directed to teaching its people how to 
push, while here it would seem to be concerned 
with teaching its people how to lean." 

Within the past month two labor representa- 
tives of another organization, the National Alli- 
ance of Employers and Fmployed of England, 
which also is similar in its makeup to The 
National Civic Federation, were entertained by 
members of the Federation here. Those men 
are also members of the I'.ritish Labor party 
and of Parliament. They, doubtless, will make 
a very different report to their organization be- 
catise evidently they are exponents of the 
"leaning" theory. They frankly criticised the 
labor movement in America, as did Mr. James 
H. Thomas a few weeks earlier, as being "fifty 
years behind the British labor movement." 
When asked in what particular, they replied, 
"Lack of progressivism." When pressed for 
c instances, it all amounted to this: The 
American labor movement is not progressive 
because it is not willing to use the State at 
every turn — for old age pensions, compulsory 
sickness and unemployment insurance, the so- 
cialization of all public utilities and basic indus- 
and eventually all productive enterprises. 
In other words, the British labor movement is 
Marxian Socialism, and nothing else, while 
American labor is anti-Marxian from the ground 
The I'.ritish labor movement is also more 
progressive, to the minds of these two men. 
because it is a political party as well as an 
economic movement, whereas American labor 
has turned down the labor party idea, and is 
economic only. It has bitterly opposed all 
movements for a labor party because it be- 
lieves that such a party would end its hopes 
for better economic conditions. Even James II. 
Thomas has recently been converted to the 
American view on this point, as shown in a 
speech made by him last month at the New- 
castle Conference, in which he said: 

"Anyone who has watched the trend of events 
in the past few years would candidly admit 
that much of our industrial trouble and many 
of our disputes have been brought about by 
endeavoring to mix politics with industrial 

( >ne could gain no better idea of the differ- 
ence between the labor movement of Great 
Britain and that of the United States than 
gh a comparison of the last labor con- 
ventions of those respective bodies. At the 
British Trade Union Congress the red flag was 
conspicuously displayed on all occasions, while 
the "Internationale" was played by the bands 
and .sung at every opportunity in the conven- 
tion hall and on excursions taken by the dele- 
gates, i )n the other hand, at the Denver Con- 
vention of the American Federation of Labor 
in June, a man daring to raise a red flag or 
sing the "Internationale" would have been 
thrown out of the hall. That Convention, with 
practical unanimity, denounced the Sovietism of 
Russia and all of its offshoots. And the 
Canadian trade union movement, which is a 
part of the A. F. of L., is just as anti-Red. 
At its last annual convention in Montreal, the 
delegates expelled a group having 1. W. W, 
cards, and then, marching into the street, made 
a bonfire of huge bundles of Socialist, 1. \\ . W. 
and Bolshevist literature. 

It is not difficult to prove that the wages, 
working conditions and general lot of the 
American worker are far better than those of 
the worker in Great Britain or any other coun- 
try, and that the governmentally controlled so- 
cial reforms, such as compulsory unemployment 
insurance, are pauperizing the Britisli working 
people as well as destroying their initiative and 
will to work. 

Demoralizing Doles 

Mr. Geoffrey Drage, Chairman of the Deni- 
son House Public Assistance Committee, re- 
cently called attention to the fact that twenty- 
eight million out of a population which cannot 



be estimated at more than forty-eight million 
were receiving doles. He further stated that 
there is "an ever-increasing readiness to ri 
public assistance," and that "independence and 
self-respect, or, in other words, the reluctance 
of the poor man to receive relief is the only 
barrier against pauperism and that barrier has 
been steadily undermined in recent years by 
the varied, insidious and demoralizing doles 
which the politicians have administered." 

An American might reasonably expect that 
that would settle the question in any argument, 
but it does not. because the British Socialist 
labor party man, like all Socialists, is looking 
ni. consciously or unconsciously, to the 
day when the worker will manage and then own 
the industry himself. That is the dominating 
idea in the minds of the workers of all nations 
except our own. It is true that the foreign 
labor movements have turned down the Com- 
munism of Lenin and Trotzky because it has 
miserably failed, hut they still have a sneaking 
1 for Sovietism and the "dictatorship of 
the proletariat." They explain that when they 
take over the industries they will be prepared, 
through their education in "works councils" 
and trade union schools, to run them success- 
fully. 

In speaking of the policies of the American 
labor movement, I am not including that rela- 
tively small group in the needle trades — the 
Balkans of American industry — which is as 
revolutionary as anything in Europe and, of 
course, is not affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor. In fact, it is not an 
American but a Russian movement. At this 
writing, the president of the largest union in 
the group, the Amalgamated Clothing Workers, 
it is claimed, is en route to Moscow at the 
call of the Soviet Government. Notwithstand- 
ing the brutally frank revolutionary character 
of the so-called needle trades organizations, 
tiny are coddled by the radical and "liberal" 
elements in our churches, colleges and social 
reform movements. 

If the foregoing description of the industrial 
situation is correct: if the American labor move- 
ment is all that is claimed in this statement, 
surely the reader would say that every good 
citizen should lie for it but, instead, we find 
that a movement which the employers in Eu- 
rope would welcome there is bitterly fought by 
many employers here, some even wanting to 
exterminate it. Why this anomaly? 

If the radical labor views of Europe prevailed 
here, there would be no discussion about the 
open and closed shops, what the wages should 
be or who should run the industries. The 
workers themselves, or through the State, would 
attend to all those little matters. One answer 
question is that not having the big funda- 
mental issues to light over that exist in other 
countries, they contend over the comparatively 
minor questions. There is as much human 
nature here as elsewhere, plus a special com- 
plexity of our own, due to the many different 
nationalities that compose our citizenry. When 
the workers in a given plant speak thirty-one 
different languages, many of them not knowing 
gle syllable of Fnglish, the control by the 
union leaders is frequently nil, and radical out- 
breaks occur that seem as revolutionary as any- 
thing to be found in Furope. 

Hut there are other problems in this country 
which lead to serious conflicts that intelligent 
and persistent effort would reduce to a mini 
mum. While the interests of capital and labor 
.ire not identical, many of their differences are 
capable of adjustment. 

Industrial Platform Proposed 

To ascertain how far it is possible to con- 
struct an industrial platform upon which the 
'hree great divisions of society, capital, labor 
and the general public can stand, the Execu- 
tive Council of The National Civic Federation 
has organized a National Industrial Committee 
:omposed of a hundred publicists, officials of 
'.he leading nonrevolutionary labor organizations 
.ind employers. The last-named group includes, 
not only employers who deal with organized 
labor and are, therefore, friendly toward it, but 
hose who, while opposed to many of its poli- 
cies, appreciate what it has accomplished, and 
recognize its basic soundness as shown by its 
unequivocal stand against all movements of a 
"Reddish" hue. 

To aid the work of the committee, a ques- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



tionnaire has just been sent to employers, labor 
officials and publicists which includes the fol- 
lowing: 

What is meant by "Industrial Democracy" 
as applied to employe representation plans? 

Y\ hat is collective bargaining, and is it appli- 
cable under all conditions? 

Where both sides are fully organized, as in 
the building trades, what would you suggest as 
a method for preserving the benefits of collec- 
tive bargaining and at the same time protect- 
ing the public from extortion? 

Is compulsory arbitration workable, and is it 
desirable, if workable? 

Is the writ of injunctions in labor disputes 
being abused? 

Can the shop committee system be made 
equally workable in union and nonunion plants? 

Is the "American" or open shop movement 
aimed at the destruction of the trade unions, 
as charged by labor? Or is it, as claimed by 
its promoters, an honest endeavor to find some 
method for giving men in nonunion plants a 
voice in determining the conditions under which 
they work? 

What arc the rights of "the public" in in- 
dustrial disputes, and how is "the public" to be 
defined? 

How can the evil of unemployment be miti- 
gated, not only in normal times, but in the 
present state of acute depression? 

The members of the National Industrial Com- 
mittee have no illusions about the establishment 
of an industrial Utopia this side of the millen- 
nium, and they do not expect that it will be 
i<" ible to work out an agreement on all the 
matters enumerated. Nor do they expect, in 
connection with the questions upon which 
doubtless they will agree, that such agreement 
will be binding upon anyone or that its effect 
will be other than that of a moral influence. 
The committee does believe that the time is 
again ripe to attempt the working out of a 
modus vivendi between capital, labor and the 
general public. During the war there was estab- 
lished a so-called Magna Charta of Industry, 
which served during the stress of the war emer- 
gency, but which was abandoned upon the sign- 
ing of the armistice. There followed, a year 
later, two industrial conferences, called by the 
President, which had a splendid moral effect 
ai the time, although one of them did not agree 
upon any program. The National Industrial 
Committee hopes to profit by all of the educa- 
tional work done by previous conferences and, 
ii it is able to contribute only a little toward 
the establishment of a better understanding be- 
tween the three great elements making up our 
national life, it will feel well repaid for the 
effort. At any rate, at a time when the other 
labor movements of the world are attacking 
American labor because it will not join them 
in their revolutionary programs, it seems as if 
the least that our patriotic and fair-minded citi- 
zens can do to show their appreciation of its 
splendid stand is to join hands with it in try- 
ing to make conditions better for the workers 
in the shops, mines, mills, railroads and all 
other places where men and women toil. And 
instead of encouraging movements to destroy 
the unions, they should encourage the unions so 
to improve their methods and programs that 
employers would regard it advantageous to deal 
with them. 



ANTI-LABOR LAW ATTACKED 



A demand for a public hearing on a hill 
alleged to be aimed at defendants in labor 
eases in Federal Courts is made in a letter 
from Albert DeSilver, a director of the 
American Civil Liberties Union, to Congress- 
man Andrew J. Volstead, chairman of the 
Judiciary Committee of the House. The hill, 
which has already passed the Senate, changes 
the law by making it possible to rerm 
without a hearing, as at present, persons 
indicted in one place from any plate where 
they happen to be arrested. The Civil Liber- 
ties Union and other interested organiza- 
tions charge that the bill is an "attempt to 
railroad defendants without a chance to be 
heard." Mr. DeSilver, in his letter, says: 

"Under the existing law, which Senator 



Nelsons hill would repeal, when a person 
indicted, for example, in California, is found 
in Maine, there is no difficulty about having 
him arrested. He may, however, though 
indicted, be innocent. The law takes ac- 
count of the possible hardship of whisking 
an innocent man away from his home and 
friends and attorneys and bondsmen to de- 
fend himself against a charge of crime in 
a remote part of the country where it is 
not unlikely that he is not only without 
friends or counsel, but also a subject of 
hostile feeling". He cannot be removed with- 
out proof that an offense was committed and 
that there are good grounds for believing 
him guilty. He can, before removal, test 
the validity of the law and of the indictment, 
or prove in cases of mistake that he is not 
in fact the person wanted. He may also 
have hail fixed in a community where he is 
known. 

"Senator Nelson's hill would do away 
with all this consideration for possible and, 
in fact under our traditions, presumed inno- 
cence. It provides that a person indicted 
under a Federal statute may be summarily 
seized wherever he may live or be and re- 
moved without hearing to the place of in- 
dictment, no matter how remote. If, after 
whatever lapse of time, it turns out that 
his arrest was a mistake, he will be given 
his mileage home and a maintenance allow- 
ance not exceeding $5 a day as compensa- 
tion." 

The bill is being opposed by representa- 
tives of the American Federation of Labor 
as a "legalization of judicial kidnaping." 
It is not known what interests are behind 
the bill, but in administration would be most 
likely to he used against those involved in 
labor cases. 

The American Civil Liberties Union asks 
those interested in opposing the bill to 
write Andrew J. Volstead, I louse ( )ffice 
Building, Washington. D. C. The bill is 
Senate Rill 657. 



HOWAT STANDS PAT 



From his cell in the Cherokee County 
jail in Columbus, where he. received a tele- 
gram from John L. Lewis, international 
president of the United Mine Workers of 
America, announcing the suspension of 
District 14, Alexander Howat made this 
statement : 

"To hell with John Lewis and Governor 
Allen. Our plans are unchanged. We will 
continue the fight." 

The Kansas district of the United Mine 
Workers of America, District No. 14, was 
suspended by Lewis. Howat and all other 
district officers are summarily removed, 
and George L. Deck, until the district's 
suspension the international board mem- 
ber, has been appointed acting president 
of a provisional district. 

The Kansas miners have been idle for 
two weeks, or since Howat and August 
Dorchey, the district vice-president, went 
to jail at Columbus to serve a six months' 
sentence for violation of the Kansas In- 
dustrial Court law. 

The cause of the action of Lewis in 
suspending the district, is based upon the 
refusal of Howat and his district board to 
put back at work miners called out on 
strike at the Dean and Reliance mines last ; 
spring. 



Always demand the Union Label! 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD 

International Seamen's Union of America, 

355 North Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 

International Seamen's Union of America will 

be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia— 

38 Trades Hall, Sydney, N. S. W. 

49 Clarence Street, Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford Street, Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Trades Hall, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adeliade, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward Street, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks' and Stewards' Association 
of New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

National Sailors' and Firemen's Unions. Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway Street, Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 

Butchers and Bakers, 14-16 Central Building, 41 

North John Street, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM 

Belgian Seamen's Union, Brouwersvliet 30, 
Antwerp. 

GERMANY 

Transportarbeiter Verband, Reichsabteilung 
Seeleute. Engelufer 18, Berlin S. O. 16, 

Germany. 

FRANCE 

General Federation des Marins, 4 Avenue 
Opera, Paris. 

NORWAY 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev 
Wedels plads 5, Kristiania. 

Norsk Restaurationsforbund, Sandbrogatan 7, 
Bergen. 

SWEDEN 

Svenska Sjomans Unionen, 4 de Langgatan 
25, Goteborg, Sweden. 

Svenska Eldare Unionen, Andra Langgatan, 
46 Goteborg. 

DENMARK 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbogade, 15 Copen- 
hagen. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Copenhagen. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, L. Strand- 
strade 20, Copenhagen. 

HOLLAND 

Zeelieden Vereeniging "Eendracht," 4 Nieuw- 
steeg, Rotterdam. 

ITALY 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Corso Principe Odofie 2, Genoa, Italy. 
SPAIN 
Sociedad Sindical de Fonda Maritima de 
Camaros, Cocincros y Reposteros, Calle Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle 
Inglaterra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
Firemen), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Remadores, Rua 
Barao de San Feliz 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedade Uniao dos Foguistas, Largo de 
Sao Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marittimo dos Empregados em Ca- 
mara, Rue dos Benedistinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



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Pacific Coast Marino § 



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Rids are being submitted for the 

mer "Mandarin." owned by the 

Shipping Board. The vessel has 

been lying in port at San Francisco 
since lasl March. She was built in 

Chinese shipyards for the account of 
the Shipping Hoard under wartime 
contracts. 

The lowest point in many year- m 
the grain charter market at Port- 
laud. Ore., was reached when steam- 
ers were offered at the rate of 47s 
o.l a ton to Continental Europe, with 
no takers. The charter market took 
a sharp slump from 55s to 50s about 
two weeks ago, when the first symp- 
toms of a cessation of buying in 
Europe appeared. 

\ reduction has been made by the 
Pacific-Argentine-Brazil Line in the 
rate on lumber to Montevideo and 
Brazilian ports. The line operates 
from the West Coast of the United 
States, around South America, out- 
ward through the Straits of Magel- 
lan and homeward through the Pan- 
ama Canal. The new rate of $17 per 
1000 feet was made with the id< 
stimulating the lumber trade. 

Approximately 40,000,000 feet of 
lumber lias been sold for shipment 
from Portland, Ore., to the Orient 
before the end of the present year, 
according to estimates made by local 
exporters. Full and part cargoes 
will be supplied to more than twenty 
handle the output. Much 
of the lumber will go out on Japa- 
nese bottoms, of which the "Yonan 
Maru" will take 3,000,000 feet before 
the end of the present month. 

The San Pedro Harbor Commis- 
sion has been notified by the War 
Department that the plans submitted 
for the drawbridge across the chan- 
nel leading to Long Uracil have been 
approved. The plans call for an ex- 
penditure of $500,000. The bridge 
is to connect the truck boulevard 
from Los Angeles with Terminal Isl- 
and and the industries and wharves 
there. The bridge will carry two 
roadways and two railroad tracks. 

United States Shipping Board ves- 
sels will continue in the trade from 
this coast to Australia. This was 
the announcement made after a sur- 
vey of trade possibilities and the 
of a favorable profit for 
the government, hour big freighters 
allocated to the General Steamship 
Company will ply out of coast ports 
to the Antipodes on a monthly 
schedule. They are the "West Mah- 
wah," "West tslip," "West Camargo" 
and another steamship not yet desig- 
nated. 

Figures supplied by the Gray's 
Harbor Stevedore Company show 
that the harbor has shipped since 
a total of 4,822,000,000 feet of 
lumber by water. In 1909 there was 
a total of 460,000,000 feet of- lumber 
shipped in vessels, while last year 
only 365,000.000 feet was shipped. 
To October 1. this year, 39 vessels 
of 8000 tons or better have called at 
Cray's Harbor ports and left $310,- 
000 in the way of pilotage., stevedor- 
ing and port expenses. The figures 
were compiled by the Hoquiam 
Commercial Club for use in connec- 
tion with a request for better treat- 
ment of the district, with special 
reference to a lightship, the rebuild- 
ing of the naval radio station at 
\\ estport, and a dredge to keep the 
harbor channel clear for the large 
ships. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 

SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 

Prices 

Represented by 



All work done in 

our own sanitary 

workshop 

E. PEGUILLAN 



Established 
for 20 years 



Tacoma, Wash. 



Phone Main 2941 

SEAMEN! 

Meet your friends for a good time 

in pool and cards at 

H. BADER'S 

CIGAR AND TOBACCO STORE 

2115 North 30th Street. Old Town 

Tacoma. Wash. 



SEAMEN!— 

When in Tacoma eat at the 

North Star Restaurant 

Btrictly Union House 
NERHEIM & STROM, Proprietors 

North 30. Old Town 
Tacoma. "Wash. 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

MEN OF THE SEA! 

When in Port Don't Fail to Visit 

THE HOME OF THE UNION LABEL 

Most Complete Line of Union Made 

SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR AND FURNISHINGS 

In America at Factory Prices 

1118 Market St., Opp. 7th 
San Francisco 

717 K St., near Postoffice 
Sacramento 

112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 




S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. G. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor. Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUPOF COFFEE 



— or — 



A SQUARE MEAL 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka. Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



MARINE ENGINEERING — NAVIGATION 

We prepare you for examination in four to six weeks — either course. 
Eighty dollars pays for individual instruction until you get your license. 

THE TECHNICAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

W. P. Pierson, Principal 
Phone Fillmore 9 7 0—2707 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Anderson, Gunnar 
Apinaitis, Antony 
Vmundsen, Ben 
Allen, E. 
Bllxt. Gustaf 
Boyle, Hugh 
Bob. H. C. 
Barlow, Joseph 
Berglund. Emll J. 
Bieker, Matthew 
Baartman, J. H. 
Brady, K. C. 
Bjorseth, K. M. 
Rennett, Chas. C. 
Bakke. Eilif J. 
Cormack, W. 
Corrigan, Reul B. 
De Mon, Earl 
la, Henry 
Erlekson, Hans E. 
Engler, Samuel 
Elze, Carl 
Fors, Axel R. 
Fischer, Chaa. O. 
Frlck. H. C. 
Fielding, P. 
Foster, Clarence 
Grelphan, Paul 
Golden, Roy L. 
Gray, John 
Gorman, Peter A. 
Green, Joe 
1 1 .in. M. 

Hansen, Harold V. 
Hansen, ThorwaM 
Heikka, Ernest 
Hall, Robert B. 
Hopperman, H. 
Holman, Martin 
. Hanson. William 
Huber, Charles L. 
Howell, E. W. 
Hines. Leo 
Holmes, M. 
Inguealsen. Arthur 
Jegstrup, Harold 
Johanson, K. E. 
Jensen, (lust 
Jordan, Bdw. EC 

John 
Jonsson, R. H. -2699 

T. -3040 
Jensen, Emanuel 
Jensen, Chris 

-2278 
Keller. E. 
Kane. J. 
Kelley, Albert J. 

i'i ed 
Kellog, ("has. M. 
Kiepper, T. 
Korliz, Jack 
Kraus, .Tark 
Kange, Max 
Larson, Chris 
Lackey, Chas. H. 

M. 
Marshall, John 
McGorvln. I lonald E. 



Mortell. A. 
McCormick, Harold 

w. 
Mi'Hnnald, James 
Martin, Charles 
Mallkoff, Peter 
Meyer, Robert 
Morey, Art J. 
Marklm, Bernard 
Mackway. George 
Nilsson, lCmil 
Neuman, Wm. 

Xa.su. B. 
Neuman, Alex 
Neuman, John C. 
Norgaard. Henry 
Olsen, Sverre B. 
i ilson, John A. 
Pedersen, Andreas 
Pilags, John 

: gen. Frank M. 
Pope, Hert 
Rier, Earl 
Rolfsen, Rolf 
Rengsdorf. W. 
Spencer, Tom 
Baalman, Joseph 
Stretton, M. 
Skartland. Gunnar 
Sterchle, Jack 
Sullivan. John 
Story. 10. A. 

Saunders, D. a. 
Seppa. Sulo 
Sperry, Leslie 
Schroder, E. 
Svendy, Emil 
Scubber, Hans 
Sibley, Milton 
Tuomiiu n. Nik) 
Taylor, Emerson 
Tensfeldt, John S. 
Thornquist. Adolf 
Veits. Clayton L. 
Wilson. .1. W. 

Wezwager, Andrew 

Weber, Fred C. 
Westley, W. E. 
Walter, E. 
Wallace, Chess C. 
Witravamen, Geo. 
Warnlck. A. D. 
Walters. Fred L. 
Wohn, Otje 
Wolff, Herbert 
Wood, E. E. 
White, William 
WiTtanen, Frans 
Willey, Edward 
York, Chas. E. 
PACKAGES 
Adams, H. C. 
Heaps, James 
La Born, Roy 
Okasskl, Welling- 
ton 
Scarthland, Gunnar 
Williams. Edward 



Mrs. Margareth Watson is anxious 
to ascertain the whereabouts of her 
husband, John Watson, who left 
Seattle on board the S. S. "Jadden,"' 
and was then heard from in June. 
1920, on board the S. S. "Quaker 
City," at Philadelphia. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts, kindly 
communicate with his wife at 3420 
Thirty-ninth avenue S. W., Seattle, 
Wash. 6-22-21 



J. Latvala is anxious to ascertain 
the whereabouts of Arne Wartiainen, 
a native of Finland. Anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts, kindly commu- 
nicate with the above named at 
Box 306, R. F. D. 2, Kirkland, Wash. 

4-20-21 



Fred Klein, who left New Orleans 
on the S. S. "Lake Ferona" in 
March, 1920, is inquired for by his 
father, L. Klein. Address, care the 
Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Associa- 
tion, 543 Bienville Street, New 
Orleans, La. Charles Thoresen 
Agent. 



Anyone knowing how Eugene Mc- 
Nulty, coalpasser, met his death re- 
cently at Boat Harbor, Newport 
News, Va., while employed on S. S. 
"Co'quit," will confer a favor on his 
mother, Mrs. Frances McNulty, 511 
Hemlock street, Scranton, Pa., or 
Silas B. Axtell, 9 State street, New 
York City, by communicating with 
either one. 



ALBERT MICHELSON, Attor- 
ney-at-law; attorney for Marine 
Firemen & Watertenders' Union; 
Admiralty law a specialty. 676 Mills 
Bldg., Telephone Douglas 1058. Resi- 
dence Phone Prospect 2908. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of William Peterson, born in Nor- 
way, last heard of in Bayonne, N. J., 
when he quit the S. S. "Gulfland" on 
November 11, 1918; is requested to 
communicate with Joseph A. Moran, 
43 Ship street, or John Ward, 489 
Eddy street, Providence, R. I. 

4-27-21 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
in the Nation. Tinder government cen- 
sorship It Is Increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
| ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
! ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
! fairly. Senator La Follette is making a 
i real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
| profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Beeause of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other man in public life. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year — Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine. Madison. Wis. 

All hopes that the Navy Depart- 
ment will, in the near future, under- 
take the rebuilding of the Westport 
radio station, which was burned last 
May. was abandoned upon receipt by 
the Aberdeen Chamber of Commerce 
of a letter from Rear Admiral M. 
Johnson anil Captain E. II. Dodd, 
.statin- that not only was the Navy 
unable financially to undertake the 
work of rebuilding, but that the per- 
sonnel was so low at present that 
ni) operators for such a station could 
be spared, several radio stations al- 
ready built standing idle for lack of 
operators. Assurance was given in 
the letter, however, that when condi- 
tions become normal the station will 
once more be set in operation. 

An interesting feature is connected 
with the sailing of the motorship 
"Angeles" for the feeder service be- 
tween Ensenada and San Pedro. The 
"Angeles" was formerly the United 
States patrol boat "Rainier." She 
was utilized at San Francisco during 
the war, but as she bad a Speed of 
only 4'.. knots an hour, her sale was 
ordered. When Charles Cullen pur- 
chased the vessel many steamship 
officials gave him the laugh. They 
called her the "snail." Cullen took 
the craft to the Crowley shipyard, 
where her engines were overhauled 
and a new patented speed propeller 
was installed. On the trial trip be- 
fore her departure. Cullen made 
knots an hour with the vessel, which 
is considered very satisfactory. She 
can transport 800 tons of cargo. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



yiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinuiH 



lll!|llllliUm!llllllll!lllllllll!lll!l!llllllll!ll!lllllll!!lllllllllllllllllllllllll[lll 

Building Material Prices Jump 10007, 

While wage-earners are being harangued 
(in the need for wage reductions to stimu- 
late building, owners of terra cotta have 
jumped prices 1000 per cent and over, and 
these business men are now under a Fed- 
eral indictment. 

Except in a few sections of the country 
where the United Brick and Clay Workers 
of America are making a successful fight 
for living conditions, this industry is on 
an anti-union basis. 

Terra cotta may properly be classed as 
next in importance to steel and cement in 
the building industry. 

"These terra cotta owners," said Federal 
Attorney Haywood, "got together and di- 
vided the United States into certain defi- 
nite divisions of territory as arbitrarily 
and with as complete and definite discipline 
as the German general staff used in divid- 
ing the western front into combat sectors. 
\\ c find that this vast industry, reaching 
from here to the Pacific Coast, has been 
within the complete and arbitrary control 
of about twenty-three men throughout the 
L'nited States. These men are banded to- 
gether and operate almost as one. 

"Not until building material is brought 
down to reasonable prices will there be any 
extensive building in the large centers. 

"No one group or single terra cotta man- 
ufacturer in the so-called central or west- 
ern territory would have dared to come 
into New York or any part of the eastern 
territory. They were not satisfied with a 
division of territory, but felt that, to more 
completely control their price-fixing scheme 
and the stifling of competition, they had 
to divide the business among themselves 
in their own territory. Each concern was 
allowed a quota of business and great 
pains were taken by all the others to see 
that none of them exceeded its respective 
percentages. 

"That there were no mere technical vio- 
lations, and that these men knew they 
were violating the law, is apparent from 
the fact that the schemes were hatched 
behind barred doors at secret weekly meet- 
ings at which no secretary or outsider was 
ever permitted to enter and of which no 
minutes or records of any kind were kept. 

"We find that, with the possible excep- 
tion of rare and isolated instances, not a 
single manufacturer had increased his kiln 
capacity. They took pains to see that the 
simply never equaled the demand." 



caira Fedlersxtlnosa off ILcmlbos' 



Determined, Popular Will Can Enforce 
Disarmament 

Remedial legislation is always forced 
from below; it never comes from above. 

Special privilege and its retainers are 
well aware of this fact, hence their hatred 
for "agitators" who spur the people to in- 
telligent determination. 

Reaction never gives. What it yields is 
forced from unwilling hands. 

Wage-earners may well recall this his- 
toric fact, especially in these momentous 
days when the world is discussing disarma- 
ment as never before. 

Despite its wealth and resources, our 
country is staggering under military taxes. 



Social progress is ignored that battle- 
ships may be built, death-dealing airplanes 
perfected, treacherous submarines invented 
and poison gases discovered. 

Of every dollar Congress appropriated 
for the 1919-1920 fiscal year, 93 4/10 cents 
was for war and its effect and 6 6/10 cents 
for human welfare and government ad- 
ministration. 

Democratic ideals will be eventually de- 
stroyed when a people permit 94 per cent 
of their government's income to be used 
for war. 

Only blind optimism can ignore the fu- 
ture when but 6 6/10 per cent is used for 
human welfare, education, research, the 
arts and sciences, agriculture, mining, for- 
estry, transportation and administering 
government. 

This 94 per cent policy can be changed, 
but it will never come from above. 

As men, women and children get into 
this fight, the circle of protest is enlarged. 
As individuals stand apart and listen to 
reaction's sophistry and alarms, the day 
of victory is postponed. 

Let every citizen swell the thunderous 
roar for peace. 

Create a public opinion that will be an 
irresistible tidal wave. 

Join the A. F. of L. demonstration in 
your locality on Armistice Dav, Novem- 
ber 11. 

If one has not been initiated, start one. 

Have your union act. Appoint commit- 
tees to visit other unions and civic bodies. 

The people will respond. They are tax- 
burdened, war-weary and tired of the pre- 
tense of militarists and greed. 

Vitalize the A. F. of L.'s forty-year de- 
mand for peace. 



They Wonder at Unrest 

"Wages must come down, is the cry one- 
hears among certain classes," says the Cot- 
ton Factory Times of Manchester, England. 

"We hear it from the pompous commer- 
cial traveler who charges his firm first- 
class, and travels third; from the shop- 
keeper who has made his pile by charging 
war prices for old stock, and from the non- 
descript people who call themselves 'mid- 
dle class.' 

"Ask these same people why the 'sal- 
aries' of royalty, the prime minister, cab- 
inet ministers, government heads, arch- 
bishops, etc., should not be reduced, and 
they will pooh-pooh the idea. 'The dignity 
of the office and the country must be main- 
tained,' etc., etc. 

"Just so. 'Twas ever thus. And then 
these biased, shortsighted people wonder 
why extremists are getting the ear of the 
people." 



Printers employed on Jewish newspapers 
in Chicago have established the six-hour 
work day, with five hours for night work. 
Wages have been raised from $46.65 a week 
to $57 for the first six months and $59 
thereafter. 



S. T. ftogevoll, Admiralty Lawyer, Seamen's 
cases a specialty. Sixth floor, Pacific R1<1r.. 
Fourth and Market Sts., San Francisco, Phone 
Kearny 1880.— Adv. 



International Seamen's Union j 
©f America 

iiiiDiiiiiiiim 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 



. THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary 
355 North Clark Street. Chicago. 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1% Lewis Street 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 67-69 Front Street 

BALTIMORE, Md C. RASMUSSEN, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN, Agent 

13 South Second Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va JULIUS NELSON. Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala VINCENT M. THORN, Agent 

60y 2 Saint Michael Street 

| NEW ORLEANS. La CHARLES THORSEN, Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex SAM HALL, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex L. LARSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I CHARLES MARTELL, Agent 

369 South Main Street 

PORTLAND, Me N. P. CLAUSEN. Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla R. J. LEWIS. Agent 

437 East Bay Street 

PENSACOLA, Fla LEON W. MENDEL, Agent 

707 Paiafox Street 

TAMPA, Fla C. F. BIGELOW. Agent 

205 Polk Street 

CHARLESTON. S. C ERNEST H. STEWART, Agent 

13 Vendue Range 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowline- Green 8840-8841 

Branches: 

NEW YORK. N. Y D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER. Agent 

22S Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. J. SIGGERS. Agent 

411 Union Street 

BALTIMORE, Md H. MEYERS, Agent 

1710 Thames Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa FRANK NOLAN, Agent 

140 South Third Street 

GALVESTON, Tex CHAS. F. BULLOCK, Agent 

413y 2 Twenty-first Street 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y OSCAR CARLSON, Secretary 

70 South St. Phone John 975 and 976 
Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES LYNCH. Agent 

164 Eleventh Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa JAMES J. FUREY, Agent 

138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md PATRICK KEANE, Agent 

804 South Broadway 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex F. J. JOHNSON, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON. Tex J. KOMISKIE, Agent 

2318% Post OrHcc Street 

BOSTON, Mass JOHN OLSEN, Agent 

288 State Street 

NORFOLK, Va PETER McKILLOP, Agent 

513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAN LYONS, Agent 

541 Toulouse Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. McCABE, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. T. rIASSARD, Agent 

515 Eddy Street 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

WM. H. BROWN, Secretary 
Branches: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass NEWMAN SHEA. Agent 

209 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JAMES J. FAGAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J H. F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 

BOATMEN'S BENEFICIAL ASSOCIATION 

H. ESKIN, Secretary 

IiOBOKEN, N. J 316 River Street 



EASTERN MARINE WORKERS' ASSOCIATION 
NEW HAVEN, Conn - 13V4 Collta Street 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Published Weekly at San Francisco 
by THE 

SAILORS - UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 

J. VANCE THOMPSON ! Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.60 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office, Martime Hall Bldg., 

B» Clay St., San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 

Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should 
address all communications of a business nature to 
the Business Manager. 

Entered at the San FrancTsco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103. Act of 
October 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of 
general interest, brief, legible, written on one side 
only of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's 
name and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible 
for the expressions of correspondents, nor for the 
return of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, i CTOBER 19, 1921. 



ABSTRUSE REASONING 



If evidence has been lacking to complete 
conviction that the present policy of the 
A. F. of I., could be used as an anesthetic 
on labor, it appears to have been furnished 
in the Labor Hay statement of Ralph M. 
Easley, Secretary Executive Hoard of the 
National Civic Federation. In order to 
give our readers an opportunity to judge 
for themselves, the matter, as released, is 
reproduced in this issue of the JOURNAL. 

In spite of the fact that the present 
government of Russia has survived the 
most distressful period of the world's his- 
tory, and that it still withstands all the 
machinations of greed and superstition, 
the reconstructive efforts of the Russian 
people are positively declared to be in 
vain, [f such were the case, the workers 
and all of humane instincts could only feel 
sorrow and sympathy, while the exploiters 
and heartless may gloat. 

However, when review is made of the 
other European labor movements the feel- 
ing does not appear quite as sanguine as 
first impressions might suggest. It is con- 
ceded that notwithstanding the fact that 
Italian, French, British and other labor 
bodies have failed to affiliate with the 
Third Internationale, they are imbued 
with practically the same spiril of class 
consciousness; therefore, their program 
would not in any maimer lie acceptable to 
the American labor movement. 

The significant element is contained in 
the vein of regard for the permanent 
established institutions which runs through 
the whole statement, and a warning to the 
most aggressive and unscrupulous of 
.American employers. They are plainly 
shown that, instead of being a menace to 
their interests, the recognized American 
labor movement, as constituted in the 
American Federation of Labor, stands as 
a barrier between "big business" and the 
masses of workers who are now showing 
signs of restlessness under ruthless ex- 
ploitation. 

The impression is given that tin pi 
drive on the masses has gone to a point 
of uncertainty, if not danger, and that tor 



the time being the pressure should be 
eased. Having surfeited, the lion can af- 
ford to temporarily lay down with the 
Iamb. Labor at the same time receives the 
doubtful imitation to act the part of the 
lamb. 

The implication is not lacking that the 
interests of capital and labor should be 
regarded as identical, and in order to 
give effect to that idea it is suggested that 
"big business'" recognize the worth of the 
American Federation of Labor. 

Recognition would, of course, carry 
with it a resumption of trade agreements, 
entered into by different crafts, at differ- 
ent times, and the restoration to respect 
ability of the labor leaders. The con- 
summation of such desired end would place 
the employers in direct control of the 
labor movement, while efforts of the rank 
and file could be permanently nullified by 
ambitious labor czars. 

Truly the observations of the National 
Civic Federation have been intense, and 
their reasoning abstruse. Unless the 
workers are vigilant and determined, their 
hopes and aspirations will be vain and 
their liberties forever curtailed. 



LAUDABLE EFF( >RTS 



In an effort to obtain reasonably fair treat- 
ment from the San Francisco and Portland 
Steamship Company, who were operating the 
S. S. "Alaska" when that vessel was wrecked 
on Blunt's Reef. August 6, 1921, the surviv- 
ors have organized into a body known as the 
Association of Surviving Passengers and 
Crew of the Steamship "Alaska." In a 
recent communication to the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific, the president of the Associa- 
tion. T. X. Putnam, says : 

Y.ou have all seen the many pictures in our 
local papers. You have read the harrowing de- 
of many who were rescued. Von have t.lt 
a sympathetic anguish with these families who 
will never In' re-united because of the forty or 
more human souls who perished. But you have 
Formed of what the owners of this 
criminally anil negligently operate. 1 vessel have 

in regard to the surviving passengers and 
crew, who lost all their I 
or who ed illness and permanent ph 

injury, or their bereaved families into whose 
homes death has come. You will he .surprised 
to know that this wealthy, enterprising ship 
i perating company has refused absolutely to 
pay any claims or make any reparation v ! 
ever tn these deserving claimants. The com- 
pany is hiding behind an inequitable, unjust and 

I antiquated law. known as the "limitati 
of liability." In other words, tin- company 
states that its liability shall not exceed the value 
of the steamship "Alaska," and. since the vessel 
of the ocean, these claimants 
no recourse. 
It is a sound public policy that the maritime 
laws should impose the same responsibility upon 1 
the common carrier of the sea as upon the land. 
In other words, if you travel by the railroad 
i Portland to San Francisco, and, through 
the negligence of the railroad crew, passengers 
are injured in a wreck, tin- negligence is mi- 
ll to the company, and tie ly must 
respond in full damages. I >n the sea this ancient 
relic of lb,' law holds that the mere negligen 
ol the crew in causing the wreck cannot be 
blamed u] ompany. 

the first time in the history of a sea 

dy, the suvivors have banded together to 

secure their rights which a powerful corporation 

ha- refused them. 'This Association of th 

viving Pas and Crew of the Steamship 

"Alaska" was organized so that, jointly, they 
may secure sufficient funds to help those who 
are in destitute circumstances, but, primarily, to 
sufficient fin